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Way Station af Clifford D. Simak
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Way Station (original 1963; udgave 1998)

af Clifford D. Simak (Forfatter), Jack Williamson (Introduktion), Vincent DiFate (Illustrator)

MedlemmerAnmeldelserPopularitetGennemsnitlig vurderingOmtaler
2,087675,720 (3.94)148
Hugo Award Winner: In backwoods Wisconsin, an ageless hermit welcomes alien visitors--and foresees the end of humanity . . . Enoch Wallace is not like other humans. Living a secluded life in the backwoods of Wisconsin, he carries a nineteenth-century rifle and never seems to age--a fact that has recently caught the attention of prying government eyes. The truth is, Enoch is the last surviving veteran of the American Civil War and, for close to a century, he has operated a secret way station for aliens passing through on journeys to other stars. But the gifts of knowledge and immortality that his intergalactic guests have bestowed upon him are proving to be a nightmarish burden, for they have opened Enoch's eyes to humanity's impending destruction. Still, one final hope remains for the human race . . . though the cure could ultimately prove more terrible than the disease.   Winner of the Hugo Award for Best Novel, Way Station is a magnificent example of the fine art of science fiction as practiced by a revered Grand Master. A cautionary tale that is at once ingenious, evocative, and compassionately human, it brilliantly supports the contention of the late, great Robert A. Heinlein that "to read science-fiction is to read Simak."  … (mere)
Medlem:Neil_Luvs_Books
Titel:Way Station
Forfattere:Clifford D. Simak (Forfatter)
Andre forfattere:Jack Williamson (Introduktion), Vincent DiFate (Illustrator)
Info:The Easton Press
Samlinger:Dit bibliotek, Skal læses, Masterpieces of Science Fiction
Vurdering:
Nøgleord:science fiction

Detaljer om værket

Mellemstation af Clifford D. Simak (1963)

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» Se også 148 omtaler

Engelsk (62)  Italiensk (2)  Finsk (2)  Tjekkisk (1)  Alle sprog (67)
Viser 1-5 af 67 (næste | vis alle)
This is the best regarded book from the third Science Fiction Writers of America Grand Master, and unlike most books from the Golden Age of Science Fiction, it has aged pretty well. The protagonist is a man out of time, a civil war era soldier whose life has been unnaturally extended, and the antagonist (as much as there is one) is the specter of global thermonuclear war.

This story contains passages with a wide variety of tones, but overall the tone is light and hopeful. Maybe because it never got too depressing, I was surprised to feel a frisson of joy as elements of the story came together.

The only thing that held this book back from being really amazing were some silly mystical elements that felt out of place and which would've benefited from more groundwork being laid earlier in the book. ( )
  wishanem | May 27, 2021 |
I like this quiet story a lot. It's in the "pastoral science fiction" corner, with philosophical musings and a lonely hermit who maintains a way station in the woods for extraterrestrials. ( )
  KatyBee | May 14, 2021 |
Enoch Wallace, a Civil War veteran living on in rural Wisconsin into the twentieth century has a unique job. He is the station keeper for an interstellar transit system. Earth is not a destination for the extraterrestrial aliens that arrive and then depart from this way station on their way to another planet. Its status as a primitive world has so far kept it from being considered for membership by the Galactic Central government which has its own factions and political considerations to balance to maintain peace, therefore Wallace is the only human who knows from firsthand experience of the existence of other non-human civilizations, and his job is to remain inconspicuous. Unfortunately, a federal agent is curious about how a veteran of the battle of Gettysburg could possibly appear to be only about thirty years old and starts to investigate Wallace.

Reading this 1963 novel reminded me why I admire Simak’s vision whose short stories first thrilled me back in junior high school as a novice science fiction fan. His stories were equally at home with the farthest reaches of space and in rural America. In this Hugo winning tale there are conflicts arising from poverty and fear of witchcraft, international tensions which are paralleled by galactic ones, and the denouement is achieved by an individual with the rare gifts of a person able to connect with a spiritual force known only as “the force.” Fans of “Star Wars” may recognize a foreshadowing of the Jedi. ( )
  MaowangVater | Jan 31, 2021 |
Good idea, but poor storytelling. Even tho book isn't long, several times i felt like putting it down, as there was nothing to keep me reading. ( )
  Karolis.Mikutis | May 12, 2020 |
It's not often you get to read a SciFi set in your own state--when that state is Wisconsin. He put in a good description of the coulees of the Driftless region but made the residents a bit too much of backwoods hillbillies. Or maybe not; compare to Kenny Salwey's "The Last River Rat."
Enoch, the protagonist, is a bit of a gentle, thoughtful soul, his response to the horrors of the Civil War. Now, about eighty years later, he can see earth heading toward another slaughter and wishes he could find some way to stop it. Most of the book is his exploration of what is a human, how can we progress, how can he use his position to help humanity.
Not all of the story makes sense. I'm not sure why Simak added in the character of Mary--perhaps he needed to show the Enoch had some normal human yearnings. And for a station required to keep its presence unknown to other humans, there are an awful lot of aliens running around on the last night. ( )
  juniperSun | Apr 20, 2020 |
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» Tilføj andre forfattere (14 mulige)

Forfatter navnRolleHvilken slags forfatterVærk?Status
Clifford D. Simakprimær forfatteralle udgaverberegnet
Baumann, JillOmslagsfotograf/tegner/...medforfatternogle udgaverbekræftet
Faragasso, JackOmslagsfotograf/tegner/...medforfatternogle udgaverbekræftet
Moore, ChrisOmslagsfotograf/tegner/...medforfatternogle udgaverbekræftet
Summerer, Eric MichaelFortællermedforfatternogle udgaverbekræftet
Van Dongen, H. R.Omslagsfotograf/tegner/...medforfatternogle udgaverbekræftet
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The noise was ended now. The smoke drifted like thin, gray wisps of fog above the tortured earth and the shattered fences and the peach trees that had been whittled into toothpicks by the cannon fire. For a moment silence, if not peace, fell upon those few square miles of ground where just a while before men had screamed and torn at one another in the frenzy of old hate and had contended in an ancient striving and then had fallen apart, exhausted.
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Here lies one from a distant star, but the soil is not alien to him, for in death he belongs to the universe.
Somewhere, he thought, on the long backtrack of history, the human race had accepted an insanity for a principle and had persisted in it until today that insanity-turned-principle stood ready to wipe out, if not the race itself, at least all of those things, both material and immaterial, that had been fashioned as symbols of humanity through many hard-won centuries.
Could it be, he wondered, that the goldenness was the Hazers' life force and that they wore it like a cloak, as a sort of over-all disguise? Did they wear that life force on the outside of them while all other creatures wore it on the inside?
...the Earth was now on galactic charts, a way station for many different peoples traveling star to star. An inn...a stopping place, a galactic crossroads.
...on the other side of the room stood the intricate mass of machinery, reaching well up into the open second storey, that wafted passengers through the space from star to star.
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Wikipedia på engelsk (2)

Hugo Award Winner: In backwoods Wisconsin, an ageless hermit welcomes alien visitors--and foresees the end of humanity . . . Enoch Wallace is not like other humans. Living a secluded life in the backwoods of Wisconsin, he carries a nineteenth-century rifle and never seems to age--a fact that has recently caught the attention of prying government eyes. The truth is, Enoch is the last surviving veteran of the American Civil War and, for close to a century, he has operated a secret way station for aliens passing through on journeys to other stars. But the gifts of knowledge and immortality that his intergalactic guests have bestowed upon him are proving to be a nightmarish burden, for they have opened Enoch's eyes to humanity's impending destruction. Still, one final hope remains for the human race . . . though the cure could ultimately prove more terrible than the disease.   Winner of the Hugo Award for Best Novel, Way Station is a magnificent example of the fine art of science fiction as practiced by a revered Grand Master. A cautionary tale that is at once ingenious, evocative, and compassionately human, it brilliantly supports the contention of the late, great Robert A. Heinlein that "to read science-fiction is to read Simak."  

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