HjemGrupperSnakMereZeitgeist
På dette site bruger vi cookies til at levere vores ydelser, forbedre performance, til analyseformål, og (hvis brugeren ikke er logget ind) til reklamer. Ved at bruge LibraryThing anerkender du at have læst og forstået vores vilkår og betingelser inklusive vores politik for håndtering af brugeroplysninger. Din brug af dette site og dets ydelser er underlagt disse vilkår og betingelser.
Hide this

Resultater fra Google Bøger

Klik på en miniature for at gå til Google Books

Indlæser...

The Day of the Scorpion (1968)

af Paul Scott

Serier: The Raj Quartet (2)

MedlemmerAnmeldelserPopularitetGennemsnitlig vurderingSamtaler / Omtaler
7591421,363 (4.13)1 / 94
The arrest by British police of ex-Chief Minister Mohammed Ali Kasim, who is known to sympathise with the Quite India movement, signifies a further deterioration in Anglo-Indian relations.For families such as the Laytons, who have lived and served in India for generations, the immediate social and political realities are both disturbing and tragic. With growing confusion and bewilderment, the British are forced to confront the violent and often brutal years that lie ahead of them.… (mere)
Indlæser...

Bliv medlem af LibraryThing for at finde ud af, om du vil kunne lide denne bog.

Viser 1-5 af 14 (næste | vis alle)
"Independence is not something you can divide into phases. It exists or does not exist."

This is the second novel in the author's Raj quartet which maps the decline of the British Raj in India. The aftermath of the assault of Daphne Manners is still playing out but the action has moved to the the town of Ranpur where a wedding is to take place.

A groom and his best man are travelling to the ceremony when a rock is hurled at their limousine. A window is shattered and the groom, Teddie, suffers a small cut on his cheek. The service is slightly delayed but otherwise goes ahead without further incident. But what prompted this act of violence?
Could it be because the limousine belongs to the Nawab, the ruler of the state, and perpetrator making a statement against his rule? Or could it be because the occupants were English and the thrower a Nationalist? Or could it be that the best man happens to be Ronald Merrick, the police superintendent at the heart of the incident involving Daphne Manners and the chief suspect, Hari Kumar? An incident which is still an open wound between Indians and English and was central to the previous novel, The Jewel in the Crown.

Merrick has by now left the Police and is now an officer in the Army whilst Hari Kumar is languishing in jail despite the fact that there has never been a trial. Merrick was not Teddie’s first choice as best man, rather a last minute substitute, and Teddie has no idea of Merrick’s past.

The middle books in a series are always hard, however there is still plenty to admire here. Along with a change of location, with the exception of Merrick and Hari Kumar there is a whole set of new characters which allows the author to give some details as to the fate of the two characters who were prominent in the first novel without it feeling like a continuation of that particular story, rather the wider repercussions that it caused.

As with the first novel there isn't a lot of action but where there is some it is quite explosive. However, this book is is at its best during some long conversations between the disparate characters. In these conversations we see the clash of personalities, classes and social status, race and political persuasions but for me the most interesting conversation is about whether or not colonisers and the colonised can ever really learn be friends or merely learn not to hate one another. Even today, in a world where terrorist incidents happen with depressing regularity, this seems to be a relevant question.

This book isn't as overtly about a commentary about colonialism and racism and the first, instead it looks in particular on the effect colonialism has on the colonisers. Therefore I have to admit that I didn't enjoy this book quite as much as I did book 1 but it is still an interesting and thought provoking read which successfully achieves what a middle-book needs to do, make the reader eager for the next, so on to The Towers of Silence. ( )
  PilgrimJess | Nov 7, 2020 |
(15) I am again fascinated by Scott's writing of the tail end of the British raj during WW2. Does this pick up where the first in the Quartet left off? Well, yes and no. We do meet Hari Kumar again, but he is not quite the focus. He instead -like all the characters - has come to symbolize something about the relationship between the British and the English. As do the next British family, the Laytons, whom we are introduced to in this book. The daughters Sarah and Susan are brought back to India, the land they were born, after going 'home' to England to be schooled. The India they return to is not quite the one they left. They return in the aftermath of the arrests on prominent members of the All India Congress party, and the Bibighar affair. I think Sarah especially senses Daphne Manners 'ghost' in her own dealings with India and its people.

It turns out Merrick has been shuttled off into the army after the mopping up of the Bibighar affair - even the British smell a rat. He becomes now entangled in the Laytons' lives and becomes by happenstance the best man at Susan's wedding. The plot from here is stunted and bizarre in a way I am now finding is characteristic of Scott. You can't always be sure exactly what he is talking about truth be told - the novel is heavy with allegory and often goes deep into the existential minds of his characters. It can be easy to put down at times. But at other times - it is breath-taking. The scene with Sarah and the officer listening to Indian music in Calcutta epitomizes this duality perfectly.

Anyway, I think I am officially obsessed. I watched the first few episodes of the mini-series 'The Jewel in the Crown' after I finished the first book and it completed atmospherically for me this poignant, languid, alcoholic, steamy, heavy story that I both can and cannot put down. Rather magical. ( )
1 stem jhowell | Apr 7, 2019 |
The opening of this novel could do with a bit of trimming. It's a little diffuse. I'm not saying cut it all out. It's beautifully written. Scott writes a high-capacity, multi-claused sentence that picks you up and takes you somewhere else. And there's a fair bit of set-up. And obviously we need to be introduced to the protagonist, Sarah Layton, who carries the novel so well. But I got the impression the author was drifting and had taken his eye off the story.

But about the two hundred page mark Paul Scott spins round with his eyes aflame and punches you twice really hard in the face with these two intense interrogation scenes. Thereafter the novel does improve, or perhaps I was simply engaged for the first time. There's no doubt that it does suffer in comparison with The Jewel in the Crown being so rich and intense. ( )
  Lukerik | May 27, 2018 |
”Sarah was conscious of belonging to a class engaged in small, continual acts whose purpose was survival through partial sharing in an evolution which, of all the family, only Aunt Lydia back in Bayswater had anticipated and closely witnessed the process of. It was a survival of exiles. Their enemy was light, not dark, the light of their own kind, of their own people at home from whom they had been too long cut off so that, returning there briefly, a deep and holy silence wrapped them and caused them to observe what was real as miniature….My history (Sarah thought, drinking her sweet gimlet, then drawing on her bitter cigarette), my history, rendered down to a colonnaded front, an architectural perfection of form and balance in the set and size of a window, and to a smoky resentment in my blood, a foolish contrivance for happiness in my heart against the evidence that tells me I never have been happy and can’t be while I live here. It’s time we were gone. Gone. Every last wise, stupid, cruel, fond or foolish one of us.” (Page 405)

For me there is so much satisfaction in sinking into a thick book written in exquisite prose that you just don’t see that often today. I scanned a review where the reader was put off by Scott’s long sentences. I love them. This kind of book takes time to read and appreciate and I love that about it.

This second volume of The Raj Quartet continues the story of the demise of British control of India, moving the story ahead to 1942-1944. D-Day has happened and everyone feels the European war will be over soon to be followed shortly by the Pacific war. The Laytons are a British family, new to the narrative, a longtime Military family who have traveled back and forth for brief visits to their homeland. Sarah is their oldest daughter and the only one who seems to have identified the need for the British to leave India.

Returning characters include Hari Kumar, who was accused of rape in the previous volume and Ronald Merrick, the police officer who lead the investigation. Hari has been jailed for political activities since they could not prove the rape charges. But he is being considered for release and the long section of the book devoted to his treatment by Merrick and other officials is brutal in its detail. Merrick is now an army officer and involved in a roadside assault. And also making an appearance is Lady Manners, aunt of the rape victim, but she is an enigma. The citizens know she’s there but no one has actually seen her.

I have to believe that Sarah, Merrick and Hari will be continuing characters in the next volume. I hope I can hold off until May to read it. This is a remarkable series. ( )
1 stem brenzi | Apr 22, 2018 |
This book was a true paradox for me. On the one hand Scott lays out a compelling plot. This was one of those books that I could not wait to get back to reading during my lunch break or on the bus. On the other hand, however, Scott's style is extremely hard going. He has a predilection for very long sentences and his constant use of dangling prepositions is at best inelegant. Nothwithstanding, the book is certainly worth a read for the portrayal of a way of life that no longer exists. ( )
  oparaxenos | Nov 27, 2015 |
Viser 1-5 af 14 (næste | vis alle)
ingen anmeldelser | tilføj en anmeldelse
Du bliver nødt til at logge ind for at redigere data i Almen Viden.
For mere hjælp se Almen Viden hjælpesiden.
Kanonisk titel
Originaltitel
Alternative titler
Oprindelig udgivelsesdato
Personer/Figurer
Oplysninger fra den engelske Almen Viden Redigér teksten, så den bliver dansk.
Vigtige steder
Oplysninger fra den engelske Almen Viden Redigér teksten, så den bliver dansk.
Vigtige begivenheder
Oplysninger fra den engelske Almen Viden Redigér teksten, så den bliver dansk.
Beslægtede film
Oplysninger fra den engelske Almen Viden Redigér teksten, så den bliver dansk.
Priser og hædersbevisninger
Indskrift
Tilegnelse
Oplysninger fra den engelske Almen Viden Redigér teksten, så den bliver dansk.
To FERN and JOHN with deep affection and regard
Første ord
Oplysninger fra den engelske Almen Viden Redigér teksten, så den bliver dansk.
The writer encountered a Muslim woman once in a narrow street of a predominantly Hindu town, in the quarter inhabited by money-lenders.
Citater
Sidste ord
Information fra den tyske Almen Viden. Redigér teksten, så den bliver dansk.
(Klik for at vise Advarsel: Kan indeholde afsløringer.)
Oplysning om flertydighed
Forlagets redaktører
Bagsidecitater
Originalsprog
Canonical DDC/MDS

Henvisninger til dette værk andre steder.

Wikipedia på engelsk (1)

The arrest by British police of ex-Chief Minister Mohammed Ali Kasim, who is known to sympathise with the Quite India movement, signifies a further deterioration in Anglo-Indian relations.For families such as the Laytons, who have lived and served in India for generations, the immediate social and political realities are both disturbing and tragic. With growing confusion and bewilderment, the British are forced to confront the violent and often brutal years that lie ahead of them.

No library descriptions found.

Beskrivelse af bogen
Haiku-resume

Quick Links

Populære omslag

Vurdering

Gennemsnit: (4.13)
0.5
1 1
1.5
2
2.5
3 16
3.5 10
4 52
4.5 16
5 32

Er det dig?

Bliv LibraryThing-forfatter.

 

Om | Kontakt | LibraryThing.com | Brugerbetingelser/Håndtering af brugeroplysninger | Hjælp/FAQs | Blog | Butik | APIs | TinyCat | Efterladte biblioteker | Tidlige Anmeldere | Almen Viden | 155,814,974 bøger! | Topbjælke: Altid synlig