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Seven Surrenders: Book 2 of Terra Ignota af…
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Seven Surrenders: Book 2 of Terra Ignota (udgave 2017)

af Ada Palmer (Forfatter)

Serier: Terra Ignota (2)

MedlemmerAnmeldelserPopularitetGennemsnitlig vurderingOmtaler
3912248,666 (4.1)23
It is a world in which near-instantaneous travel from continent to continent is free to all. In which automation now provides for everybody's basic needs. In which nobody living can remember an actual war. In which it is illegal for three or more people to gather for the practice of religion--but ecumenical "sensayers" minister in private, one-on-one. In which gendered language is archaic, and to dress as strongly male or female is, if not exactly illegal, deeply taboo. In which nationality is a fading memory, and most people identify instead with their choice of the seven global Hives, distinguished from one another by their different approaches to the big questions of life. And it is a world in which, unknown to most, the entire social order is teetering on the edge of collapse. Because even in utopia, humans will conspire. And also because something new has arisen: Bridger, the child who can bring inanimate objects to conscious life.… (mere)
Medlem:susanramirez
Titel:Seven Surrenders: Book 2 of Terra Ignota
Forfattere:Ada Palmer (Forfatter)
Info:Tor Books (2017), 366 pages
Samlinger:Dit bibliotek
Vurdering:
Nøgleord:to-read

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Seven Surrenders af Ada Palmer

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Viser 1-5 af 22 (næste | vis alle)
This was much easier to read than the first book, I think because I had the hang of the Hives and the characters, plus there was a desperately-needed character list in the front. I checked it out from the library Saturday afternoon and stayed up till I finished in Sunday night. Not too bad for a dense, 400 page book!

This book got into a lot of the deep ideas touched on in the first book: utopia and the complacency it breeds, human nature, God and why the universe is like this if there is one, gender, the morality of killing a few to save the many.....on and on. It was a thought provoking book. Sometimes the speeches were a little implausible--I'm sorry, if you tried to film someone giving a long, philosophical speech while fencing on a rooftop or performing cunnilingus, the ridiculousness would be obvious. But in general I was too caught up in the story (and in keeping the plot and characters straight) to notice any flaws.

I do have one complaint about the pronouns. Most characters use "they" for everyone because the future is post-gender. But the narrator uses he, she, and most objectionably, it for various characters. Not based on how they identify, but on random whims he gets about one character being fierce, another being caring, a third because of what they have in their pants. And he's....really obsessed with what people have in their pants. I get that the narrator is not supposed to be a good guy, but it's still off-putting to read. I feel like the author could still make the point that gender is important to humans without dehumanizing people like that. ( )
  jennelikejennay | Dec 31, 2020 |
In this second part of Ada Palmer's 'Terra Ignota', we are plunged directly back into her 25th Century Enlightenment society (this is certainly NOT a stand-alone novel). We get more of the deeply philosophical exploration of Palmer's future world as the various factions and individuals manoeuvre and plot against each other and sometimes even themselves.

Along the way, we engage in discourse over the nature of God or Gods (like any Enlightenment treatise worth its salt, the role of God in human affairs is taken as given, though at the same time that same subject is definitely on the table for discussion) and also the question of the extent to which the Ends justify the Means - even if the End is something extremely noble that Humankind has claimed to be questing for almost all its existence - the quest for peace. A major conspiracy to preserve peace at almost any cost was uncovered at the end of the first novel; this book begins to explore that, especially in looking at the motives of its central character, reformed mass murderer Mycroft Canner. But then the stakes are ratcheted up as other characters begin to contemplate returning War to the world, for a range of reasons ranging from "because we can", via "it is in our nature to do this" to "because it may be a Good Thing in the long run". I'm rather disquieted by the ease with which Palmer embraces this debate because this is usually a view that puts me off many a more overtly militaristic book (a lot of "military sf" is like this, embracing war with all the enthusiasm of early 20th Century General Staffs who saw war as inevitable and were always planning for the next war). But Palmer is a historian and history lecturer, and so this coldly analytical approach should be expected. There is also a veiled warning that because (in the novel) there has been more than 300 years of peace, war when it comes will be all the more terrible because we will be such amateurs at it. By extension, the argument runs that it is therefore better to have regular small wars, so people don't forget how awful it is. I'm not certain I find that easy to stomach.

Despite the density of the writing, I found this a quick and compelling read, though. At tines I was reminded of Shakespeare's histories; at other times, I was thinking more of Michael Moorcock's 'Dancers at the End of Time'. Palmer puts rather more wide-screen set-pieces into this book than book 1; and there are surprises. Not all the surprises were in the plotting, though; although the author makes a big thing of having used an Eighteenth Century style for the novel, there are some surprising infelicities of phrase and one complete failure to follow her own rules for reported speech in a different language at one point. And some naughty impulse made me suddenly switch one character whose English was especially formal, with lots of "thees" and "thous", into a broad Yorkshire accent, which oddly enough worked. Only UK readers are likely to have this problem.

Nonetheless, I thought this novel was better than 'Too Like the Lightning' and I shall move on to Book 3 very soon. ( )
1 stem RobertDay | Dec 20, 2020 |
In the end, there is a lot to like in this series - fascinating worldbuilding, some great characters, and intriguing philosophical questions. But it's not for me. I don't like secret societies, I don't like books without sympathetic characters, and something about the actual plot of the first two novels feels too much like a building horror show to me to give me any pleasure. (It perhaps doesn't help that that building horror show sometimes too closely mirrors the actual politic climate of the moment.) ( )
  elenaj | Jul 31, 2020 |
The second instalment of Palmer's Terra Ignota series continues the tale told by Mycroft Canner, the reformed criminal at the nexus of the power elites of this 25th century world. The theological - and downright magical - aspects that had appeared in Too Like The Lightning become markedly stronger, an I'm not sure that I should any more class this as science fiction, although I find the distinction unimportant, as this is very much a philosophical novel, and still utterly wonderful.



The author delves further into some of the philosophical ideas of the previous volume, while introducing some more and deeper, and all handled wonderfully within the storylines, never feeling forced or crowbarred in. I think it is the fact that these novels are so unashamedly philosophical, along with the density of ideas and the fact that there is so much dialogue, that has lead to some reviews considering them somewhat pretentious. I don't see this at all; the lofty aims are both laudable and superbly executed.



I had thought this story was simply a duology, but see there is a third book, and a fourth on the way. I am certain Ada Palmer will continue to deliver to the high standard she has set. ( )
  Pezski | Jun 21, 2020 |
Thanks to the publisher for the ARC of this novel!

This is one of those situations where extremely high expectation meets flawless delivery, and I can't be happier for it.

Too Like The Lightning was a futuristic political thriller with very heavy under and overtones about the meaning of God and what it means, with great variety and depth of exploration, to a people who are both jaded and very reliant on old Enlightenment ideas and ideals even though they're firmly set in the 25th Century.

By way of great reveals and thriller moments, we're invested in the machinations of seven enormous political entities defined by the ideals they hold since nations' borders are pretty much a dead issue with near-instantaneous travel.

We're introduced to so many great elements in that novel and even more that I'm not even touching upon here, such as gender questions, practical and general philosophy, and especially the whole realm of politics and its basic nature.

However, while all of these issues are also important in the sequel, the one that really strikes me as most important is the whole issue of God and/or Gods.

Things get really hairy when an actual incarnation of a deity in the shape of a growing little boy who is now a young man who really can perform miracles, potentially unlimited miracles, finally has the attention of the rulers of this strange, nearly utopian Earth on the brink of war and total dissolution.

On the other side of the coin and firmly in the political arena is another deity who has been locked away from his ineffableness and who has been seated firmly in the body of a regular human. His is knowledge without power as the other is power without knowledge. This spinning coin is truly hypnotic even as the enormous world-building and the political maneuvers reach a screaming intensity, and let's not lose sight of the truly wonderful characters of Mycroft and Sniper and Carlyle that carry this tale all the way through to a fascinating conclusion.

Not that this is the end of the tale, of course.

Ada Palmer has done something truly brilliant with these tales and the sheer density of ideas and the drives of such a strong underlying tales are more than enough to make me a lifelong fan and rabid reader of much, much more. I suspect that we're far from done with this. I was satisfied with the end of Too Like The Lighting and I was very satisfied with the end of Seven Surrenders, too, which is a very neat trick for any tale so complicated as these. Even so, I was heavily motivated to re-read the first in preparation for this one and I was very happy to do so.

These are extremely re-readable tales with a lot of easter eggs and multiple layers even while the text is quite easy to follow. It's a mark of something quite amazing, I believe. Just the really late realization of what the Masons really meant even though all of it had been staring in my face all along made me grin like an idiot for a good fifteen minutes. I love being surprised and being shown that I'm rather dim-witted. :)

This is a very smart read and well-worth a lot of close attention. I know that both of these novels have rocketed up to my top-favorite tales. :)

Keep a close eye out for these! The quality is quite amazing. :)

( )
  bradleyhorner | Jun 1, 2020 |
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It is a world in which near-instantaneous travel from continent to continent is free to all. In which automation now provides for everybody's basic needs. In which nobody living can remember an actual war. In which it is illegal for three or more people to gather for the practice of religion--but ecumenical "sensayers" minister in private, one-on-one. In which gendered language is archaic, and to dress as strongly male or female is, if not exactly illegal, deeply taboo. In which nationality is a fading memory, and most people identify instead with their choice of the seven global Hives, distinguished from one another by their different approaches to the big questions of life. And it is a world in which, unknown to most, the entire social order is teetering on the edge of collapse. Because even in utopia, humans will conspire. And also because something new has arisen: Bridger, the child who can bring inanimate objects to conscious life.

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