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Homesick for Another World: Stories af…
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Homesick for Another World: Stories (original 2017; udgave 2017)

af Ottessa Moshfegh (Forfatter)

MedlemmerAnmeldelserPopularitetGennemsnitlig vurderingOmtaler
5773330,471 (3.7)27
"An electrifying first collection from one of the most exciting short story writers of our time. Ottessa Moshfegh's debut novel Eileen was one of the literary events of 2015. Garlanded with critical acclaim, it was named a book of the year by The Washington Post and the San Francisco Chronicle, nominated for a National Book Critics Circle Award, short-listed for the Man Booker Prize, and won the PEN/Hemingway Award for debut fiction. But as many critics noted, Moshfegh is particularly held in awe for her short stories. Homesick for Another World is the rare case where an author's short story collection is if anything more anticipated than her novel. And for good reason. There's something eerily unsettling about Ottessa Moshfegh's stories, something almost dangerous, while also being delightful, and even laugh-out-loud funny. Her characters are all unsteady on their feet in one way or another; they all yearn for connection and betterment, though each in very different ways, but they are often tripped up by their own baser impulses and existential insecurities. Homesick for Another World is a master class in the varieties of self-deception across the gamut of individuals representing the human condition. But part of the unique quality of her voice, the echt Moshfeghian experience, is the way the grotesque and the outrageous are infused with tenderness and compassion. Moshfegh is our Flannery O'Connor, and Homesick for Another World is her Everything That Rises Must Converge or A Good Man is Hard to Find. The flesh is weak; the timber is crooked; people are cruel to each other, and stupid, and hurtful. But beauty comes from strange sources. And the dark energy surging through these stories is powerfully invigorating. We're in the hands of an author with a big mind, a big heart, blazing chops, and a political acuity that is needle-sharp. The needle hits the vein before we even feel the prick"--… (mere)
Medlem:cvrai
Titel:Homesick for Another World: Stories
Forfattere:Ottessa Moshfegh (Forfatter)
Info:Penguin Books (2017), Edition: Reprint, 304 pages
Samlinger:Ebooks
Vurdering:
Nøgleord:Ingen

Detaljer om værket

Homesick for Another World: Stories af Ottessa Moshfegh (2017)

  1. 00
    Den fremmede af Albert Camus (j_aroche)
    j_aroche: If you ever feel like an alien in the wrong planet.
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» Se også 27 omtaler

Viser 1-5 af 33 (næste | vis alle)
Gangbusters good except for the last story (I think I missed the conceit in that one). Especially good: Mr. Wu, the opening story, an honest woman, the beach boys, dancing in the moonlight.

What fun to inhabit such despicable, naive characters.

The POV characters have fucked up notions of romance/friendship/family/success garnered from pop culture that serve them poorly. They flail around in personal dramas set in dilapidated corners of the landscape.

  trotta | Mar 4, 2021 |
Lots of people living miserable lives. Somehow it's uplifting. ( )
  mjhunt | Jan 22, 2021 |
I came into this short story collection from another, Karen Russell’s Orange World and Other Stories. Maybe like being a comedian who never wants to go on stage right after another comedian has rocked the house, experiencing Homesick for Another World right then wasn’t fair or “objective” enough. If a previous collection has wowed you from the first story to the last, starting up another author’s stories will take a little time to adjust to. Your mind knows they’re different, but you haven’t quite clued into this new style, you haven’t found your reading legs yet. Just a few stories later, I had found my Moshfegh legs and had quickly learned to love them.

My reading choices come from the large stacks of books that surround me, as well as the recent arrivals on my doorstep. Within two weeks, I found myself reading these two short story collections, as well as Aime Barrodale’s You Are Having a Good Time, and Sorry for Your Trouble by a longtime favorite, Richard Ford. I was awash in the shorter form and loving it.

Ottessa Moshfegh is mostly known for her fascinating novels; Death in Her Hands, My Year of Rest and Relaxation, Eileen, and McGlue; but this collection shows how fertile her writer’s mind truly is. If you want stories that are always original, probing, and well-built, Homesick for Another World is a perfect world for you. Moshfegh’s work roams the planet and is as varied as her birthright, being the daughter of a Croatian mother and an Iranian father. Her characters are rich in flaws (Can you say weirdos and creeps?), sometimes positively pathetic, but you won’t be able to take your mind’s eye off them. Owing to the title, there’s expectedly a feeling of homesickness and a certain level of despair that lives in many of the stories, along with a lot of humor.

I try not to mention blurbs and reviews, but I just loved this cluster of words from the New York Times review, “Dark, confident, prickling stories.” Those words drew me in and I love to be surrounded by this writer’s pure originality, never knowing where she might take me next. ( )
  jphamilton | Oct 12, 2020 |
The fourteen stories in this collection are challenging. They may also be very good, though sometimes the challenges they present may confound even the heartiest desire to admire them. Liking them would be a stretch, but perhaps Moshfegh is sanguine about the fact that her fiction will require a bit of a stretch.

The stories are peopled with marginal characters, flawed in both obvious and subtle ways. They are rarely self-aware. And although life seems, to them, to merely happen, for the reader events are more often seen as a consequence of the character’s action or inaction. Some of the protagonists are, apparently, merely waiting, as though in holding mode. What exactly they are waiting for is less clear, especially since they themselves have such odd misapprehensions of the world around them that their stated aims are less than reliable.

Moshfegh is unafraid of taking on identities far from her own, be that in gender, time, or ethnicity. Surprisingly, even though a reader might not conclude that she loves her own creations, she does show them the respect of spending time with them, in their lives and in their minds, however uncomfortable that might be. And she invites us to join her there. I’m just wary, or at least uncertain, of what I might be gaining from such an experience.

There is a great deal of anxiety, sadness, ill feeling, and self-loathing in these stories. And not a lot of joy or humour. Which is a bit disappointing because, on the evidence of her novels, it’s clear that Moshfegh is entirely capable of embracing the absurd and the ridiculous. Does she withhold these aspects of life because of the short story form? I wonder.

Gently recommended. ( )
  RandyMetcalfe | Sep 30, 2020 |
Much like Eileen, her Booker prize-shortlisted novel, Ottessa Moshfegh’s stories revel in and celebrate everything that is detestable, squalid, rank, and filthy in human existence. These are stories about people misled by desire, whose moral compass has long since malfunctioned, whose disfigurements are more than skin deep, whose weirdness does not raise eyebrows because it’s just standard operating procedure in the bizarre, morally lax world where they reside. These are people who are in all probability destined for lives of solitary misery and self-abuse. But it would be reductive to state that Moshfegh’s characters, men and women alike, have chosen self-loathing and self-destruction over some happier, healthier alternative. Moshfegh never shows us a character actually choosing self-harm or immoderate drinking or casual drug use or some other self-destructive behaviour. When we meet them, these behaviours are already ingrained and habitual. The sordid and desolate fate that awaits them is already a foregone conclusion: not only are they immune to redemption and recovery, but even a tentative step in that direction, even a smidgen of self-improvement, is never really considered as a viable or even desirable option. Many of Moshfegh’s characters simply want to be left alone so they can get back to their boozing and self-medicating in order to make their lives tolerable. Such as the self-loathing Miss Mooney, in the ironically titled “Bettering Myself,” an alcoholic teacher in a Catholic school who falsifies her students’ exam results and sleeps on her desk. Other characters are hilariously self-deluded, such as the emotionally reticent Mr. Wu in the eponymous story, who has fallen hopelessly and ridiculously in love with the woman who works the front desk at the video arcade. But Mr. Wu, who regularly engages in kinky sex with prostitutes, finds many aspects of human intimacy disgusting and ultimately lacks the courage to declare his love and risk rejection. In “Slumming,” another teacher-narrator owns a summer house in the ramshackle town of Alna, where poverty and boredom are endemic, but where “The cost of living was a joke,” making it possible for her to live as if she’s rich. Her needs are simple: cheap drugs and dime-store junk. This description probably makes it obvious that the stories in Homesick for Another World are not for all tastes. Moshfegh’s characters are indifferent to just about everything, including their health and well-being and what happens to themselves and those around them. Again and again she shocks us with explicit descriptions of human stupidity, cruelty, sexuality, excretions and deformities. You will not find happiness in these pages. What you will find is people exploiting one another and feeding off each other’s weakness, seeking gratification by any means at hand. Be warned that when you open this book you enter a dimly lit, malodorous underworld of human degradation. However, the payoff is enormous. These are frightening, uninhibited works of fiction. They are perverse, brazenly grotesque and deeply disturbing. But they are also darkly comical, tirelessly inventive and endlessly entertaining. ( )
  icolford | Jun 1, 2020 |
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"An electrifying first collection from one of the most exciting short story writers of our time. Ottessa Moshfegh's debut novel Eileen was one of the literary events of 2015. Garlanded with critical acclaim, it was named a book of the year by The Washington Post and the San Francisco Chronicle, nominated for a National Book Critics Circle Award, short-listed for the Man Booker Prize, and won the PEN/Hemingway Award for debut fiction. But as many critics noted, Moshfegh is particularly held in awe for her short stories. Homesick for Another World is the rare case where an author's short story collection is if anything more anticipated than her novel. And for good reason. There's something eerily unsettling about Ottessa Moshfegh's stories, something almost dangerous, while also being delightful, and even laugh-out-loud funny. Her characters are all unsteady on their feet in one way or another; they all yearn for connection and betterment, though each in very different ways, but they are often tripped up by their own baser impulses and existential insecurities. Homesick for Another World is a master class in the varieties of self-deception across the gamut of individuals representing the human condition. But part of the unique quality of her voice, the echt Moshfeghian experience, is the way the grotesque and the outrageous are infused with tenderness and compassion. Moshfegh is our Flannery O'Connor, and Homesick for Another World is her Everything That Rises Must Converge or A Good Man is Hard to Find. The flesh is weak; the timber is crooked; people are cruel to each other, and stupid, and hurtful. But beauty comes from strange sources. And the dark energy surging through these stories is powerfully invigorating. We're in the hands of an author with a big mind, a big heart, blazing chops, and a political acuity that is needle-sharp. The needle hits the vein before we even feel the prick"--

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