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The Voynich Manuscript af Raymond Clemens
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The Voynich Manuscript (udgave 2016)

af Raymond Clemens (Redaktør), Deborah E. Harkness (Introduktion)

MedlemmerAnmeldelserPopularitetGennemsnitlig vurderingOmtaler
336477,686 (4.44)2
"The fifteenth-century work commonly known as the Voynich Manuscript is often called the world's most mysterious book. Written in an unknown script by an unknown author, the manuscript has no clearer purpose now than when it was rediscovered in 1912 by rare books dealer Wilfrid Voynich. The manuscript appears and disappears throughout history, from the library of the Holy Roman Emperor Rudolf II to a secret sale of books in 1903 by the Society of Jesus in Rome. The book's language has eluded decipherment, and its elaborate illustrations remain as baffling as they are beautiful. For the first time, this facsimile, complete with reproductions of elaborate folding sections, allows readers to explore this enigma in all its stunning detail, from its one-of-a-kind 'Voynichese' text to its illustrations of otherworldly plants, unfamiliar constellations, and naked women swimming though fantastical tubes and green baths. The essays that accompany the manuscript explain what we have learned about this work--from alchemical, cryptographic, forensic, and historical perspectives--but they provide few definitive answers. Instead, as New York Times best-selling author Deborah Harkness says in her introduction, the book's essays 'invite the reader to join us at the heart of the mystery.'"--… (mere)
Medlem:RossStein
Titel:The Voynich Manuscript
Forfattere:Raymond Clemens (Redaktør)
Andre forfattere:Deborah E. Harkness (Introduktion)
Info:Yale University Press (2016), Edition: Illustrated, 304 pages
Samlinger:Dit bibliotek
Vurdering:
Nøgleord:Ingen

Work Information

The Voynich Manuscript af Raymond Clemens (Editor)

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Viser 3 af 3
A fascinating introduction to the most mysterious medieval work of all time. The snippets of history behind its few known owners, the manuscript dropping off the map for hundreds of years, and the ominous little letter written by Voynich's wife shortly after his death just add more layers to the mystery, and make me wish I could follow this book back in time. If the opportunity ever presented itself, it would be enough to see who wrote it and why.

With no background anywhere near that of the greats who have scratched their heads over this, I'm still left wondering, as always, whether the Voynich is some sort of highly obscure, occult text or a lucky man's trip through an alien landscape. I'd love to think that the otherworldly plants exist somewhere out there that we have yet to discover, perhaps because we're not ready for it yet, and that all the text is meant to tell us how best to navigate such an environment. Or maybe it's a collection of arcane rituals that may or may not have any impact on human lives. The missing pages come to mind - a whole chunk out of the "herbal" section, along with a few missing from the possible "recipe/usage" section, which could be a few key plants taken out of the picture by someone who knew them. (Kircher, perhaps? I still find it strange that anyone would send him an entire book overseas asking for a translation, when it could so easily get lost in transit along with any promising results. Plus, no answer from Kircher was received in the end.) So much mystery, and there's a chance that some of the necessary answers are simply hiding in plain sight - in the pages of the Voynich itself, a pile of artifacts in some private collection, or even a stack of unsorted documents in a museum archive. Makes me wish I had gone into a field that allowed me to pore over ancient books every day.

At the same time, as much as I want the mystery to be solved, I love that it remains unsolved. No other work that I know of has captivated people from so many walks of life, across so many centuries and generations, despite not a single word of it being understood. By the very puzzle of its existence, it brings people together - and I can't help but wonder whether its nameless writer, lost in the endless march of time, might not have intended this in the first place. ( )
  Myridia | Jan 19, 2024 |
Several years ago, Yale University, which holds the Voynich Manuscript, released hi-res scans of the Voynich Manuscript to the public on the internet. Since then, a number of low quality prints have been available in bookstores. Some were just reprints, some high quality attempts at reproductions, some e-books (people shelling out 99¢ for something they could get for free), and some accompanied by earnest, but sophomoric, attempts at a translation.

Thus when the Yale University Press finally undertook to release a nice edition in 2016, it was a big deal. The images are pretty crisp and clear. The many foldouts are expensively reproduced. The introductory material and the scholarly appendices are interesting, though too short for an expert, they are perfect for a Voynich novice.

Anyone interested in the Voynich Manuscript should buy this as a handy reference. In 2017, Watkins published a similar facsimile in a smaller, less-expensive version (about half the retail price).

Note, it is not a straight up facsimile (like an Indy grail diary you can buy online), and the images are reproduced at their actual size, so don't buy it looking for blow-ups of the pages. They have an internet for that.

If you are a Voynich Manuscript fanatic, get the Yale version first. If you are a Voynich Manuscript novice, get the Watkins version first and work your way up to the Yale version. ( )
  tuckerresearch | Sep 8, 2017 |
This oversized, hardcover reprint of Beinecke MS 408, commonly known as the Voynich Manuscript after Wilfrid Voynich who purchased it in 1912, makes for a nice addition to anyone's collection. As Raymond Clemens writes in the preface, "This facsimile strives to reproduce as much of the experience of leafing through the original as possible. Each photograph in the facsimile section is reproduced at roughly the same size as the original page in the Voynich Manuscript" (pg. xvi). The essays following the enigmatic fifteenth century manuscript examine the earliest owners, Voynich the buyer, physical findings, cryptographic attempts, alchemical traditions, and the world's most mysterious manuscript, along with a chronology of the document. Deborah Hakrness, author of the introduction, writes, "This collections of essays, and the facsimile of the Voynich Manuscript that accompanies it, do not attempt to arrive at definitive answers to the many perplexing questions that remain about the text. Instead, they invite the reader to join us at the heart of the mystery as we strive to better understand this complex book and its history" (pg. ix). Those interested in the esoteric or bizarre will find this a great addition to their collection. ( )
2 stem DarthDeverell | Mar 5, 2017 |
Viser 3 af 3
By now, it was more or less clear what the Voynich manuscript is: a reference book of selected remedies lifted from the standard treatises of the medieval period, an instruction manual for the health and wellbeing of the more well to do women in society, which was quite possibly tailored to a single individual. The script had hitherto proved resistant to interpretation and presented several hurdles. Medieval lettering is notoriously fickle: individual letter variations, styles and combinations are confusing at the best of times. I recognized at least two of the characters in the Voynich manuscript text as Latin ligatures, Eius and Etiam. Ligatures were developed as scriptorial short-cuts. [...] It became obvious that each character in the Voynich manuscript represented an abbreviated word and not a letter.
 
Interestingly, what comes through most clearly in this volume is how much the story of the Voynich Manuscript resembles the histories of other forged or hoax texts of the Latin Middle Ages. Throughout the medieval period, authors of spurious texts surrounded their works with forged histories of lost translations, ancient and unknown languages, and chance encounters that were intended to bolster the claims of the text and its author(s). The story that emerges in the essays contains hidden letters, an invisible signature, and a secret cache of books in a walled-up library room; serendipitous discovery, flights of fancy, and public humiliation; and a cast of characters that includes mages, priests, a self-made émigré, and several of the most important figures of the twentieth century in cryptography and medieval history in the United States. The Voynich Manuscript may be a medieval hoax, but it comes by its history honestly.
 
But if we can be fairly sure that the manuscript is not a modern forgery, it by no means follows that it is not in fact a medieval hoax. Four centuries of attempts to decode, decipher, or translate the text have all ended in bafflement. The finest cryptological minds of the twentieth century and sustained computer analysis alike have drawn a blank; the text refuses to yield meaning. Attempts to find parallels to the text in cabbalistical, hermetic, or alchemical code systems have all thrown up more disparities than resemblances. What if the book’s mysteries are in fact pure mystification, specious appearance that never had any real meaning?
 
But now a British academic believes he has uncovered the secret of the Voynich manuscript, an Elizabethan volume of more than 200 pages that is filled with weird figures, symbols and writing that has defied the efforts of the twentieth century's best codebreakers and most distinguished medieval scholars.

According to computer expert Gordon Rugg of Keele University, the manuscript represents one of the strangest acts of encryption ever undertaken, one that made its creator, Edward Kelley, an Elizabethan entrepreneur, a fortune before his handiwork was lost to the world for more than 300 years.

Rugg's conclusion is that Voynichese - the language of the Voynich manuscript - is utter gibberish, put together as random assemblies of different syllables.

'People thought the manuscript had great meaning - some form of alchemy, perhaps,' said Rugg.

'In fact, it was created by Kelley as a deception to make him money. He succeeded. The Voynich manuscript was the Elizabethan equivalent of the Hitler diaries.'
tilføjet af elenchus | RedigerThe Guardian (UK), Robin McKie (Jan 24, 2004)
 

» Tilføj andre forfattere

Forfatter navnRolleHvilken slags forfatterVærk?Status
Clemens, RaymondRedaktørprimær forfatteralle udgaverbekræftet
Anonymous Voynich Manuscript AuthorForfatterhovedforfatteralle udgaverbekræftet
Bezur, AnikóBidragydermedforfatteralle udgaverbekræftet
Driscoll, David D.Bidragydermedforfatteralle udgaverbekræftet
Harkness, Deborah E.Introduktionmedforfatteralle udgaverbekræftet
Hunt, ArnoldBidragydermedforfatteralle udgaverbekræftet
Lemay, Marie-FranceBidragydermedforfatteralle udgaverbekræftet
Mysak, ErinBidragydermedforfatteralle udgaverbekræftet
Rampling, Jennifer M.Bidragydermedforfatteralle udgaverbekræftet
Sherman, WilliamBidragydermedforfatteralle udgaverbekræftet
Stenger, JensBidragydermedforfatteralle udgaverbekræftet
Zandbergen, RenéBidragydermedforfatteralle udgaverbekræftet
Zyats, PaulaBidragydermedforfatteralle udgaverbekræftet
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"The fifteenth-century work commonly known as the Voynich Manuscript is often called the world's most mysterious book. Written in an unknown script by an unknown author, the manuscript has no clearer purpose now than when it was rediscovered in 1912 by rare books dealer Wilfrid Voynich. The manuscript appears and disappears throughout history, from the library of the Holy Roman Emperor Rudolf II to a secret sale of books in 1903 by the Society of Jesus in Rome. The book's language has eluded decipherment, and its elaborate illustrations remain as baffling as they are beautiful. For the first time, this facsimile, complete with reproductions of elaborate folding sections, allows readers to explore this enigma in all its stunning detail, from its one-of-a-kind 'Voynichese' text to its illustrations of otherworldly plants, unfamiliar constellations, and naked women swimming though fantastical tubes and green baths. The essays that accompany the manuscript explain what we have learned about this work--from alchemical, cryptographic, forensic, and historical perspectives--but they provide few definitive answers. Instead, as New York Times best-selling author Deborah Harkness says in her introduction, the book's essays 'invite the reader to join us at the heart of the mystery.'"--

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