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Her Every Wish (Worth Saga) (Volume 2) af…
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Her Every Wish (Worth Saga) (Volume 2) (original 2015; udgave 2016)

af Courtney Milan (Forfatter)

Serier: The Worth Saga (1.5)

MedlemmerAnmeldelserPopularitetGennemsnitlig vurderingOmtaler
10210214,940 (3.78)6
Crash has never let the circumstances of his birth, or his lack of a last name, bother him. His associations may be unsavory, but money, friends, and infamy open far more interesting doors than respect ever could. His sole regret? Once lovely, sweet Daisy Whitlaw learned the truth about how he made his fortune, she cut him off. Daisy's father is dead, her mother is in ill health, and her available funds have dwindled to a memory. When the local parish announces a charity bequest to help young people start a trade, it's her last chance. So what if the grants are intended for men? If she's good enough, she might bluff her way into a future. When Crash offers to show her how to swagger with confidence, she knows he is up to no good. But with her life in the balance, she's desperate enough to risk the one thing she hasn't yet lost: her heart.… (mere)
Medlem:lizgloyn
Titel:Her Every Wish (Worth Saga) (Volume 2)
Forfattere:Courtney Milan (Forfatter)
Info:CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform (2016), 150 pages
Samlinger:K!ndle
Vurdering:
Nøgleord:Ingen

Work Information

Her Every Wish [novella] af Courtney Milan (2015)

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» Se også 6 omtaler

Viser 1-5 af 10 (næste | vis alle)
A direct sequel to the prior book in the series, as in, it is easier to read this book after having read the first book in the series. Both to fully understand Judith (and her connection to Daisy (the main character in this book here)), and to briefly see Daisy as a side character.

It is 1866 London, and the focus is on people who are not normally the focus of modern books set back in the mid-19th century. The focus is on Daisy, a shop-girl (she works in a flower shop) struggling to make ends meet, while supporting her mother (who has issues with her hands). Unlike the prior book that focused on Judith who was somewhat a similar situation as Daisy in the beginning of the book; Daisy is not someone who is in her position because of scandal or the like (Judith's father and brother were found to have committed treason, and Judith and family were "set down" from high class (titled class) to working class). Daisy's father was a failed grocery, mother was/is a seamstress (and/or she takes in clothing to mend). Daisy's lineage does not include high titles and high society. She's only one of the two point of views in this book, though, so what about the other?

The other is Nigel "Crash" Wedonothavelastnames. Normally referred to as Crash. Crash was constantly told he was good enough, to ignore the words flung at him, etc. etc. So Crash heard these "you are good enough" words from his family at the same time he heard the "you'll never be good enough, and you hang like your father" from everyone else. Not that it is known who his father is, or what happened to him. Daisy is of English ancestry (as far as she knows). While Crash is . . . he doesn't know. A mix, that's for certain. Chinese? Indian? African? Some European mixed in somewhere, probably? A mix.

Crash and Daisy had a history before the start of this book. They were a "thing". But they had a bad break and Daisy no longer wants anything to do with Crash (though still lusts after him); while Crash wants to prove Daisy wrong (for sending him away . . . or . . . words like that while still lusting after her).

I've already noted that Daisy works in a flower shop, but the book actually opens with her entered in a competition. It would appear that some money has been left "to the parish" I think was the wording. Money, 50 pounds, to be given to a person with a business plan. The wording as open enough that Daisy felt like she could compete for the money herself. As in, the word man was missing from the competition rules. Daisy wants to open a shop for working class women. The announcer type, the other contestants (at least one), the judges (presumably, except for one), and, a good portion of the audience treat Daisy as humorous. And one even flings horse manure at her. Despite this reaction, Daisy is chosen to be among the finalists for the prize. And will have to get up on stage again in a week's time.

Which leads to a confrontation between Crash and Daisy: Crash offers Daisy help. Back and forth - basically Daisy needs to be a lot more confident and a lot less apologetic if she hopes to have any chance of winning, and Crash can help. Daisy reluctantly agrees.

And so - the book then proceeds to follow the two of them living their separate lives, and occasionally coming together for lessons. Leading up to the big event on stage.

As was probably already seen, this is historical fiction. It is also a romance. Something of a second chance/enemies to lovers type romance (they were lovers, then they weren't - this is a second chance; they broke badly, Daisy, even if still feeling lust, loathes Crash, while Crash lusts after Daisy but also wants to . . . . teach her a lesson? (something like that, but it's all mixed up and stuff)).

I've now read 14 books this year - and I've rated this book highest.

Rating: 5+

February 25 2021 ( )
  Lexxi | Mar 13, 2021 |

Though I wasn't blown away by the first book in "The Worth Saga" I really did enjoy this novella. This focuses on Daisy (best friends with Judith Worth from "Once Upon a Marquess") and Crash.

Daisy is still blown away by the fact that her former neighbor and friend Judith is now married to a marquess. Daisy feels weird stepping foot in Judith's world, but wants to do what she can in order to provide for herself and her mother. Daisy then joins a contest, in which the best business idea wins. After initially being booed and belittled, Daisy is able to squeak through the initial round of judging. Her former lover Crash though she now despises promises to help her get ready for it.

I will start out with what I loved. I loved the idea of Daisy pushing through to go up against a lot of men in order to make her business idea come to fruition. I loved the fact that Daisy learns from her past with Crash and actually apologizes when she realizes that she hurt him (unwittingly). And I even like that Milan shows that a woman in this day and age who was not married, was often overlooked and treated as some person who was not worth as much as those who were married or well off. I can not have lasted in Victorian times.

I also loved the character of Crash though I was confused with what Milan was trying to do with him. Crash is a mixed race character who ignores those around him that would make him think he is less than what he is. He has decided upon a business idea of selling velocipedes (bicycles) and is still hurt that his romance with Daisy ended.

I liked the reappearance of Judith and loved the acknowledgement that her life was not one big bed of roses. I also loved the new secondary characters introduced in this one (Crash's grandmother and her other card playing friends).

The romance scenes between Daisy and Crash were great, and I can see why they were both attracted to each other.

I really enjoyed the ending of the book and I hope to see more of Daisy and Crash.

Now onto the not so good. I think that Ms. Milan alluded to several times that Crash was attracted to other men. And I for one am fine with bisexual characters in romance books. But it felt weird to me to have this character attracted to men but settling on Daisy. I needed more there. There is a throwaway line that Crash wants marriage and children so settled on Daisy and it didn't exactly make me think oh that's a great romance for the ages. It made me think that because of the time and place that they lived in, he decided to be with a woman.

Also the fight that ended Daisy and Crash's relationship was stupid. It made no sense, and since neither party explained themselves well I was tired of both of them. At least Crash's grandmother made him see how wrong he was.

I will read the next full length book and see if this series is one I want to continue in the future or not. ( )
  ObsidianBlue | Jul 1, 2020 |
Courtney Milan is a master of character writing and this story s no exception. She can turn a phrase like no one else.Our heroine is buffeted about in a crowd "as if she were a slice of bread that had landed in a bucket of slop". The hero is "proud to say that I'm the scion of three generations of dock whores and sailors.: We have 2 ordinary people - not lords or ladies, no titles.
These two, a woman and a man of uncertain birth and race have an uphill battle in life yet the way they handle their situations and circumstances are telling. Daisy is willing to believe the untuths that people use to hold her down while Crash chooses to not let them get to him. As he "trains" Daisy to stand up and not let words hurt her, his knowledge and advice are for all of us who have ever been beaten down, who don't know how to stand up for themselves, who believe what others say about them.
Daisy and Crash get their HEA in spite of the world's opinions and in the meantime, the reader learns to do the same. ( )
  ddeluna1 | Mar 19, 2020 |
Not often does a reader come across a heroine like Daisy. She doesn't have much but uses all that she has to make a better life for herself and the people counting on her. Learning to take care of herself will take a skill set she has yet to comprehend. Enter an old friend from a different time. Crash remembers Daisy. Headstrong, beautiful and opinionated Daisy. The girl he could never forget. The girl who turned him away. Now she needs him and he wants her. Her Every Wish is about hardship, prejudice and forgiveness. A person is measured by the obstacles they face and the strength they have to overcome them. Lesson learned.
( )
  Lashea677 | Feb 16, 2019 |
2.5 stars ( )
  WhiskeyintheJar | Feb 14, 2019 |
Viser 1-5 af 10 (næste | vis alle)
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Crash has never let the circumstances of his birth, or his lack of a last name, bother him. His associations may be unsavory, but money, friends, and infamy open far more interesting doors than respect ever could. His sole regret? Once lovely, sweet Daisy Whitlaw learned the truth about how he made his fortune, she cut him off. Daisy's father is dead, her mother is in ill health, and her available funds have dwindled to a memory. When the local parish announces a charity bequest to help young people start a trade, it's her last chance. So what if the grants are intended for men? If she's good enough, she might bluff her way into a future. When Crash offers to show her how to swagger with confidence, she knows he is up to no good. But with her life in the balance, she's desperate enough to risk the one thing she hasn't yet lost: her heart.

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