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The Inevitable: Understanding the 12 Technological Forces That Will Shape…

af Kevin Kelly

MedlemmerAnmeldelserPopularitetGennemsnitlig vurderingSamtaler
4741740,660 (3.57)Ingen
"Much of what will happen in the next thirty years is inevitable, driven by technological trends that are already in motion. In this fascinating, provocative new book, Kevin Kelly provides an optimistic road map for the future, showing how the coming changes in our lives - from virtual reality in the home to an on-demand economy to artificial intelligence embedded in everything we manufacture - can be understood as the result of a few long-term, accelerating forces. Kelly both describes these deep trends:flowing, screening, accessing, sharing, filtering, remixing, tracking, and questioning - and demonstrates how they overlap and are codependent on one another. These larger forces will completely revolutionize the way we buy, work, learn, and communicate with each other. By understanding and embracing them, says Kelly, it will be easier for us to remain on top of the coming wave of changes and to arrange our day-to-day relationships with technology in ways that bring forth maximum benefits. Kelly's bright, hopeful book will be indispensable to anyone who seeks guidance on where their business, industry, or life is heading - what to invent, where to work, in what to invest, how to better reach customers, and what to begin to put into place:as this new world emerges."… (mere)
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Viser 1-5 af 17 (næste | vis alle)
When it comes to the future and technological advance, I think there are generally three responses: 1) fear. 2) dismissal. 3) awe-inspired worship. Kelly undoubtedly falls into third grouping. I sit uncomfortably in the first. For that reason, I really really did not like the book. In fact I put it down twice to read something else. It genuinely gave me anxiety.

That said, it was not what I expected. I had thought the "12 Technological Forces" were going to be specific technologies, such as VR, the Internet of Things, the brain-net, AI, or some other life-altering technology in the making. That and so many more technologies are described in detail, but his "forces" - and chapter titles - are trends or trajectories of where he sees us going. Here they are:

1) Becoming: Moving from fixed products to always upgrading services and subscriptions. We will be forever noobs having to learn new things.
2) Cognifying: Making everything much smarter using cheap, powerful AI that we get from the cloud. The general innovation was to electrify all new produces. Now we will cognify them.
3) Flowing: Depending on unstoppable streams in real-time for everything. Infinite scroll wins.
4) Screening: Turning all surfaces into screens. The "people of the book" are becoming the "people of the screen."
5) Accessing: Shifting society from one where we own assets, to one where instead we will have access to services at all times. Delayed gratification becomes a relic of the past.
6) Sharing: Collaboration at mass-scale. Here he assumes ownership will less and less common. Consider spotify, netflix, uber, amazon kindle, etc.
7) Filtering: Harnessing intense personalization in order to anticipate our desires
8) Remixing: Unbundling existing products into their most primitive parts and then recombine in all possible ways
9) Interacting: Immersing ourselves inside our computers to maximize their engagement. If you can't interact with it, it must be broken.
10) Tracking: Employing total surveillance for the benefit of citizens and consumers.
11) Questioning: Promoting good questions are far more valuable than good answers. Answers, it turns out, are cheap... and getting cheaper.
12) Beginning: Constructing a planetary system connecting all humans and machines into a global matrix.

At first glance (and even after reading the book), it's easy to be skeptical of some them. In particular that last chapter, which I just just finished is really where he moves from being an enthusiast to a worshiper. In a thousand years, he says, humans will look back on this time as the beginning of wild wonder (my phrase). And yet, I can't help but wonder if they're look back and cringe at the ignorance.

However, as he goes through each "force," he walks through an argument for each that is compelling. And that is the reason the book is worth reading - namely, to me it seems he is (mostly) correct in his assessment of the future. That and he gives a thorough description of all sorts of technologies alive(?) and well today, or in 2016 when it was written....

A few ideas really stick out to me. First, in the tracking chapter, he goes through a long long list of ways we are already being tracked, which is a bit uncomfortable. His response was to describe a spectrum between privacy and personalization. The less privacy we have the better our recommendations will be.

In the screening chapter, he describes the culture clash between "people of the book" and "people of the screen." Despite falling resolutely with books, I cannot help but recognize the inevitable (or all but certain) shift toward more screens.

In Questioning, he praises the importance of good questions and gives solid insight on the fact that an answer yields two more questions. Therefore, as our knowledge grows exponentially so do our questions, which means our known ignorance - or the space between our answers and our questions - grows exponentially as well.

He shares the famous quote: "The best minds of my generation are thinking about how to make people click ads." He pushes back on this idea, and goes on to cherish the "active mind" that the internet promotes, in contrast to a "contemplative mind." This, I cannot disagree with more.

All-in-all, the book did provide key insights on what is and likely to come, and it was more philosophical in nature than I expected. I felt also that it was just too long. Half of what he said could have been cut. Also, he offers basically no critique of technology, or really any sort of help on how to navigate the coming onslaught of life altering changes in the near future. In short, he welcomes it all. The old serendipity prayer starts, "Help me to accept the things I cannot change...." If it all really is "inevitable," I can't help but think he's onto something.... ( )
  nrt43 | Dec 29, 2020 |
Some people cannot be cured of optimism. If only the author could compare his previous predictions with reality. I fear that even if he wanted to do that he would take his life as a representative example of reality and somehow believe that everyone in the world is like him.

I am punching the next person who quotes the future is not evenly distributed line. ( )
  Paul_S | Dec 23, 2020 |
I'd heard Kevin Kelly on several podcasts and found him intriguing. This book is a nice look into the mind of silicon valley, but it presents a very myopic view of what may or more importantly should happen as technology progresses. ( )
  ZephyrusW | Oct 6, 2020 |
What a fascinating book!The Inevitable: Understanding the 12 Technological Forces That Will Shape Our Future* written by Kevin Kelly takes a look at how technology is impacting our world and the impacts it will have on our future. Each chapter showed me much of what I already knew but it also threw back the curtain to a lot more that I had not yet considered. All I can say is that if you are not staying abreast of the changes, you will be left very far behind. Those who are educated to work with technology will have jobs. No one will be left untouched from these advancements. Read more ( )
  skrabut | Sep 2, 2020 |
An engaging introduction to the future. This book goes just a single notch deeper into what we can expect in the next 30 years than other prediction site, blogs and books (like those of Michiu Kaku). Those are intended more to inspire, as if to establish the preface of a world-building sci-fi novel. Kelly's book leans more towards a prep course.

He outlines way more than just future tech. His premises are inevitable changes in how the world will function: tagging, tracking, screening, accessing, etc. Each chapter explains how those verbs have started to become the foundations of how we exist, and how they will continue to, THROUGH tech trends. The tech is merely the result of these underlying foundations, it serves the concepts. And it put me in the mindset of preparation, not inspiration, which is ironically more inspirational. Loved it. You should read it. ( )
  pmcinern | May 10, 2020 |
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"Much of what will happen in the next thirty years is inevitable, driven by technological trends that are already in motion. In this fascinating, provocative new book, Kevin Kelly provides an optimistic road map for the future, showing how the coming changes in our lives - from virtual reality in the home to an on-demand economy to artificial intelligence embedded in everything we manufacture - can be understood as the result of a few long-term, accelerating forces. Kelly both describes these deep trends:flowing, screening, accessing, sharing, filtering, remixing, tracking, and questioning - and demonstrates how they overlap and are codependent on one another. These larger forces will completely revolutionize the way we buy, work, learn, and communicate with each other. By understanding and embracing them, says Kelly, it will be easier for us to remain on top of the coming wave of changes and to arrange our day-to-day relationships with technology in ways that bring forth maximum benefits. Kelly's bright, hopeful book will be indispensable to anyone who seeks guidance on where their business, industry, or life is heading - what to invent, where to work, in what to invest, how to better reach customers, and what to begin to put into place:as this new world emerges."

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