HjemGrupperSnakMereZeitgeist
Søg På Websted
På dette site bruger vi cookies til at levere vores ydelser, forbedre performance, til analyseformål, og (hvis brugeren ikke er logget ind) til reklamer. Ved at bruge LibraryThing anerkender du at have læst og forstået vores vilkår og betingelser inklusive vores politik for håndtering af brugeroplysninger. Din brug af dette site og dets ydelser er underlagt disse vilkår og betingelser.

Resultater fra Google Bøger

Klik på en miniature for at gå til Google Books

Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American…
Indlæser...

Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City (udgave 2017)

af Matthew Desmond (Forfatter)

MedlemmerAnmeldelserPopularitetGennemsnitlig vurderingSamtaler / Omtaler
3,3882043,885 (4.44)1 / 438
"[The author] takes us into the poorest neighborhoods of Milwaukee to tell the story of eight families on the edge. Arleen is a single mother trying to raise her two sons on the 20 dollars a month she has left after paying for their rundown apartment. Scott is a gentle nurse consumed by a heroin addiction. Lamar, a man with no legs and a neighborhood full of boys to look after, tries to work his way out of debt. Vanetta participates in a botched stickup after her hours are cut. All are spending almost everything they have on rent, and all have fallen behind. The fates of these families are in the hands of two landlords: Sherrena Tarver, a former schoolteacher turned inner-city entrepreneur, and Tobin Charney, who runs one of the worst trailer parks in Milwaukee. They loathe some of their tenants and are fond of others, but as Sherrena puts it, "Love don't pay the bills." She moves to evict Arleen and her boys a few days before Christmas. Even in the most desolate areas of American cities, evictions used to be rare. But today, most poor renting families are spending more than half of their income on housing, and eviction has become ordinary, especially for single mothers. In vivid, intimate prose, Desmond provides a ground-level view of one of the most urgent issues facing America today. As we see families forced into shelters, squalid apartments, or more dangerous neighborhoods, we bear witness to the human cost of America's vast inequality-- and to people's determination and intelligence in the face of hardship. Based on years of embedded fieldwork and painstakingly gathered data, this masterful book transforms our understanding of extreme poverty and economic exploitation while providing fresh ideas for solving a devastating, uniquely American problem. Its unforgettable scenes of hope and loss remind us of the centrality of home, without which nothing else is possible"--Amazon.com.… (mere)
Medlem:beninck
Titel:Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City
Forfattere:Matthew Desmond (Forfatter)
Info:Crown (2017), Edition: Reprint, 448 pages
Samlinger:2023 Reading List, Dit bibliotek
Vurdering:*****
Nøgleord:PULITZER WINNER, DIGITAL COPY

Værk information

Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City af Matthew Desmond

Indlæser...

Bliv medlem af LibraryThing for at finde ud af, om du vil kunne lide denne bog.

» Se også 438 omtaler

Engelsk (207)  Piratisk (1)  Alle sprog (207)
Viser 1-5 af 207 (næste | vis alle)
An eye-opening and powerful book about shockingly common practice of eviction in American cities.

Harvard sociologist Matthew Desmond spent months living in several different neighborhoods in Milwaukee's inner-city. This book focuses on a handful of people -- some white, some black, some single parents, some married with kids, some single -- who were all evicted during Desmond's time in the city.

Desmond gives readers an extraordinarily balanced, though bleak, view of the situations. The landlords are not completely slumlords, and the renters are not saints. In that messy "in-between" the reader will need to come to his or her own conclusions about what is just and what is unacceptable.

On a personal note, I will say that I listened to the majority of this book in the days after the 2016 Presidential Election. This is a somber, sobering book. The problems that exist seem enormous and intractable. I was already feeling despondent and, as a result, this book deepened that funk. While the topic in this book is incredibly important, I'd recommend saving it for a time when one has the mental energy to give this book its full due.
( )
  jj24 | May 27, 2024 |
It's no wonder why this book received the Pulitzer Prize. It's filled with stories from real people from different walks of life...renters and landlords, and does a wonderful job of sharing authentic stories of poverty. Matthew Desmond does an excellent job of explaining how different and similar everyone's situation is once they are trapped in the cycle of poverty-renting-eviction and rinse/repeat. It is so hard to get ahead once you have little to no income, the majority of your income goes to rent and every scrap after that is spent to survive.
It's heartbreaking and thought provoking and hopefully evokes some compassion as well. ( )
  mrsgrits | Feb 8, 2024 |
None of us set out to be poor. None of us aim to live in squalor, or hunger, or succumb to damp, icy winter. Matthew Desmond's terrific eye-witness report from the poor of inner-city Milwaukee shows us not only what we're missing. He miraculously tells us what we have in our homes that has been cut out of the lives of the poor who cannot keep their homes safe. In our lives, where there is no violence we build confidence and security in our children. The smells, the stench of broken pipes and rotting garbage do not invade our living rooms or our bedrooms. No bedbugs, no cockroaches, no rats to disgust us. No fear of drugs. No fear of the law. And no fear of the bailiff. I loved this book as much because of what tells us why our homes are so precious as what it tells about homes that are irreparably broken. You cannot read this book without some pity for these broken families, but you can come out for a great rationale for making the home so much better. While the book is ostensibly about housing, the subtext is about homes, and that isn't arguing semantics either. ( )
  MylesKesten | Jan 23, 2024 |
It is impossible to give stars for a book that is well constructed, easy to read, but has created for me a state of constant anxiety so much i can't bear to finish it. It is one of those books that let us see the deep and permanent flaws of capitalism. I am glad I read it, but I am not sure it will offer me a way to engage politically in a system that is so awful. ( )
  mslibrarynerd | Jan 13, 2024 |
EVERYONE SHOULD READ THIS BOOK. If you are pressed for time, I think it's worth it just to read the epilogue because the author lays out some solutions to the housing crisis that are worth considering. Here are some random thoughts I had about the book:

1. Think about how messed up this is: If you get evicted, you can be disqualified from receiving government housing assistance. Obviously, people who have been evicted need housing assistance the most! And yet, our system seems designed to punish people who have made mistakes or suffered from circumstances beyond their control.

2. The amount of money the government gives back to homeowners (through benefits like the mortgage interest deduction) is roughly equal to the amount of money it would take to house every American. Think about that. As Desmond says, we can afford to fix the housing crisis.

3. I was reminded often of a book I recommend all the time: [book:Random Family: Love, Drugs, Trouble, and Coming of Age in the Bronx|385255]. Together these books help undo the myth that poverty is the result of some individual weakness or failing. ( )
  LibrarianDest | Jan 3, 2024 |
Viser 1-5 af 207 (næste | vis alle)
A shattering account of life on the American fringe, Matthew Desmond’s Evicted shows the reality of a housing crisis that few among the political or media elite ever think much about, let alone address. It takes us to the center of what would be seen as an emergency of significant proportions if the poor had any legitimate political agency in American life. ... The son of a working-class preacher, Desmond is an associate professor of social sciences at Harvard, and he did much of his research as he completed a Ph.D. at the University of Wisconsin. Evicted recalls Studs Terkel’s searching representations of ordinary people in their jobs in his 1974 book, Working, and more recently, George Packer’s account of the disintegration of the social contract in The Unwinding in 2013.
tilføjet af Lemeritus | RedigerThe New Republic, Brandon Harris (betalingsside) (Apr 12, 2016)
 
It has been a long time since a book has struck me like Desmond’s “Evicted,” not since Drew Gilpin Faust’s “This Republic of Suffering,” which showed how Americans dealt with their Civil War dead. I suspect the resonance is not coincidental. Desmond, a sociologist at Harvard University, writes about another kind of mass death: The demise of opportunity and of hope that occurs when individuals are forced to leave their homes. ... “Evicted” does not traffic in tired arguments about racial pa­thol­ogies or family breakdown. Rather, Desmond identifies perverse market structures, destructive government policies and the cascade of misfortunes that comes with losing your home. ... “Evicted” is an extraordinary feat of reporting and ethnography. Desmond has made it impossible to ever again consider poverty in America without tackling the central role of housing — and without grappling with “Evicted.”
tilføjet af Lemeritus | RedigerThe Washington Post, Carlos Lozada (betalingsside) (Mar 3, 2016)
 
“Evicted” is a regal hybrid of ethnography and policy reporting. It follows the lives of eight families in Milwaukee, some black and some white, all several leagues below the poverty line. Mr. Desmond, a sociologist and a co-director of the Justice and Poverty Project at Harvard, lived among them in 2008 and 2009. ... The result is an exhaustively researched, vividly realized and, above all, unignorable book — after “Evicted,” it will no longer be possible to have a serious discussion about poverty without having a serious discussion about housing. ... “If incarceration had come to define the lives of men from impoverished black neighborhoods,” Mr. Desmond writes, “eviction was shaping the lives of women. Poor black men were locked up. Poor black women were locked out.”
 

» Tilføj andre forfattere

Forfatter navnRolleHvilken slags forfatterVærk?Status
Matthew Desmondprimær forfatteralle udgaverberegnet
Audio, Random HousePublishermedforfatternogle udgaverbekræftet
Graham, DionFortællermedforfatternogle udgaverbekræftet

Hæderspriser

Distinktioner

Notable Lists

Du bliver nødt til at logge ind for at redigere data i Almen Viden.
For mere hjælp se Almen Viden hjælpesiden.
Kanonisk titel
Originaltitel
Alternative titler
Oprindelig udgivelsesdato
Personer/Figurer
Oplysninger fra den engelske Almen Viden Redigér teksten, så den bliver dansk.
Vigtige steder
Oplysninger fra den engelske Almen Viden Redigér teksten, så den bliver dansk.
Vigtige begivenheder
Beslægtede film
Indskrift
Oplysninger fra den engelske Almen Viden Redigér teksten, så den bliver dansk.
I wish the rent
was heaven sent.
Langston Hughes, "Little Lyric (Of Great Importance)"
Tilegnelse
Oplysninger fra den engelske Almen Viden Redigér teksten, så den bliver dansk.
For Michelle, who's been down the line
Første ord
Oplysninger fra den engelske Almen Viden Redigér teksten, så den bliver dansk.
Jori and his cousin were cutting up, tossing snowballs at passing cars.
Citater
Oplysninger fra den engelske Almen Viden Redigér teksten, så den bliver dansk.
If incarceration had come to define the lives of men from impoverished black neighborhoods, eviction was shaping the lives of women. Poor black men were locked up. Poor black women were locked out.
No one thought the poor more undeserving than the poor themselves.
A community that saw so clearly its own pain had a difficult time also sensing its potential.
What the chief failed to realize, or failed to reveal, was that his department's own rules presented battered women with the devil's bargain: keep quiet and face abuse or call the police and face eviction.
Sidste ord
Oplysninger fra den engelske Almen Viden Redigér teksten, så den bliver dansk.
(Klik for at vise Advarsel: Kan indeholde afsløringer.)
(Klik for at vise Advarsel: Kan indeholde afsløringer.)
Oplysning om flertydighed
Forlagets redaktører
Oplysninger fra den engelske Almen Viden Redigér teksten, så den bliver dansk.
Bagsidecitater
Oplysninger fra den engelske Almen Viden Redigér teksten, så den bliver dansk.
Originalsprog
Oplysninger fra den engelske Almen Viden Redigér teksten, så den bliver dansk.
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC

Henvisninger til dette værk andre steder.

Wikipedia på engelsk (1)

"[The author] takes us into the poorest neighborhoods of Milwaukee to tell the story of eight families on the edge. Arleen is a single mother trying to raise her two sons on the 20 dollars a month she has left after paying for their rundown apartment. Scott is a gentle nurse consumed by a heroin addiction. Lamar, a man with no legs and a neighborhood full of boys to look after, tries to work his way out of debt. Vanetta participates in a botched stickup after her hours are cut. All are spending almost everything they have on rent, and all have fallen behind. The fates of these families are in the hands of two landlords: Sherrena Tarver, a former schoolteacher turned inner-city entrepreneur, and Tobin Charney, who runs one of the worst trailer parks in Milwaukee. They loathe some of their tenants and are fond of others, but as Sherrena puts it, "Love don't pay the bills." She moves to evict Arleen and her boys a few days before Christmas. Even in the most desolate areas of American cities, evictions used to be rare. But today, most poor renting families are spending more than half of their income on housing, and eviction has become ordinary, especially for single mothers. In vivid, intimate prose, Desmond provides a ground-level view of one of the most urgent issues facing America today. As we see families forced into shelters, squalid apartments, or more dangerous neighborhoods, we bear witness to the human cost of America's vast inequality-- and to people's determination and intelligence in the face of hardship. Based on years of embedded fieldwork and painstakingly gathered data, this masterful book transforms our understanding of extreme poverty and economic exploitation while providing fresh ideas for solving a devastating, uniquely American problem. Its unforgettable scenes of hope and loss remind us of the centrality of home, without which nothing else is possible"--Amazon.com.

Ingen biblioteksbeskrivelser fundet.

Beskrivelse af bogen
Haiku-resume

LibraryThing Early Reviewers Alum

Matthew Desmond's book Evicted was available from LibraryThing Early Reviewers.

Aktuelle diskussioner

Ingen

Populære omslag

Quick Links

Vurdering

Gennemsnit: (4.44)
0.5
1 2
1.5
2 4
2.5
3 50
3.5 18
4 211
4.5 57
5 352

Er det dig?

Bliv LibraryThing-forfatter.

 

Om | Kontakt | LibraryThing.com | Brugerbetingelser/Håndtering af brugeroplysninger | Hjælp/FAQs | Blog | Butik | APIs | TinyCat | Efterladte biblioteker | Tidlige Anmeldere | Almen Viden | 207,161,253 bøger! | Topbjælke: Altid synlig