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The last of the president's men af Bob…
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The last of the president's men (udgave 2015)

af Bob Woodward

MedlemmerAnmeldelserPopularitetGennemsnitlig vurderingOmtaler
1986102,914 (3.57)1
"Bob Woodward exposes one of the final pieces of the Richard Nixon puzzle in his new book The Last of the President's Men. Woodward reveals the untold story of Alexander Butterfield, the Nixon aide who disclosed the secret White House taping system that changed history and led to Nixon's resignation. In forty-six hours of interviews with Butterfield, supported by thousands of documents, many of them original and not in the presidential archives and libraries, Woodward has uncovered new dimensions of Nixon's secrets, obsessions and deceptions."--provided by publisher.… (mere)
Medlem:okrick
Titel:The last of the president's men
Forfattere:Bob Woodward
Info:New York : Simon & Schuster, 2015.
Samlinger:Dit bibliotek
Vurdering:****
Nøgleord:Ingen

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The Last of the President's Men af Bob Woodward

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Fascinating look at Richard Nixon through the eyes of Alexander Butterfield, the man who revealed the existence of the secret recording system in the White House. I found myself feeling sorry for Nixon and wondering how in the world someone so socially inept and emotionally stunted ended up as president. ( )
  olegalCA | Nov 30, 2016 |
5401 The Last of the President's Men, by Bob Woodward (read 24 Aug 2016) This book tells how Alexander Butterfield came to be in Nixon's White House and tells of his time there and that account is interesting but the book becomes super-exciting as it leads up to Butterfield being questioned by staffers of the Watergate Investigating committee. The Democratic staffer did not ask the question but the Republican staffer asked:" "Are you aware of the installation of any listening devices in the Oval Office?" Butterfield would not lie and answered truthfully. The entire investigation took a new turn and that question, asked on July 16, 1973, led inexorably to Nixon's resignation on August 9, 1974. The book is super-interesting, even though we all know the story. But this book throws new light on the whole story and I found it super-exciting. ( )
  Schmerguls | Aug 24, 2016 |
Was not up to Bob Woodward's standard of excellence. However, it was another interesting perspective on a major national event. ( )
  bogopea | May 15, 2016 |
It's an interesting exposition of Nixon's paranoia and awkwardness in interpersonal relationships. It's not a deep study of the Nixon White House -- confirms the view that Haldeman and Nixon ran everything and lacked any human feelings. ( )
  BrianEWilliams | Nov 29, 2015 |
This is an interesting and frightening look at the Nixon White House told from the perspective of Alexander Butterfield, most famous for his disclosure of the White House taping system that helped end a presidency. Butterfield left a promising career in the military to pursue a position in Nixon’s administration through his college association with Bob Haldeman, one of Nixon’s top aides. He ended up working in an office next to the Oval Office for three years, and in such a trusted position knew many of his boss’s secrets as well as his personality quirks. Accompanying his story are the documents that verify his tales, making it an interesting walk through history. ( )
  Susan.Macura | Nov 25, 2015 |
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Long famous for his inside sources, Mr. Woodward relies here largely on some 40 hours of interviews with Mr. Butterfield, a draft of an unpublished memoir by that former aide and a voluminous archive of documents that Mr. Butterfield — deputy to Haldeman, and near the very center of the president’s tiny solar system — took with him when he left the White House in 1973.

The resulting book, told largely from Mr. Butterfield’s point of view, often reads like a two- or three-person play, and is a decidedly slender addition to the Nixon and Watergate saga, which most notably includes Mr. Woodward’s and Mr. Bernstein’s “All the President’s Men” and “The Final Days.” It erases the image of the visionary foreign policy maker that the disgraced president tried to spin in his later years. This volume, however, simply amplifies (rather than revises) the familiar, almost Miltonian portrait of the 37th president that has emerged from the White House tapes and myriad biographies, as a brooding, duplicitous despot, obsessed with enemies and score-settling and not the least bit hesitant about lying to the public and breaking the law.
 
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(Prologue) Near the end of July 2014 I flew to California to meet with Alexander P. Butterfield, the former aide to President Richard Nixon who disclosed the secret White House taping system 41 years earlier.
Colonel Butterfield was in a foul mood.
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"Bob Woodward exposes one of the final pieces of the Richard Nixon puzzle in his new book The Last of the President's Men. Woodward reveals the untold story of Alexander Butterfield, the Nixon aide who disclosed the secret White House taping system that changed history and led to Nixon's resignation. In forty-six hours of interviews with Butterfield, supported by thousands of documents, many of them original and not in the presidential archives and libraries, Woodward has uncovered new dimensions of Nixon's secrets, obsessions and deceptions."--provided by publisher.

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