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The Rosie Effect

af Graeme Simsion

Andre forfattere: Se andre forfattere sektionen.

Serier: Don Tillman (2)

MedlemmerAnmeldelserPopularitetGennemsnitlig vurderingOmtaler
1,9311386,183 (3.59)141
The Wife Project is complete, and Don and Rosie are happily married, living in New York. But they're about to face a new challenge because, surprise! Rosie is pregnant. Don sets about learning the protocols of becoming a father, but his unusual research style gets him into trouble with the law. As Don tries to schedule time for pregnancy research, getting friends Gene and Claudia to reconcile, and staying on the right side of the social worker, he might lose Rosie when she needs him the most.… (mere)
Nyligt tilføjet afprivat bibliotek, Arina40, lgaikwad, SeppeD, JennyE1
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Viser 1-5 af 137 (næste | vis alle)
I laughed out loud. That makes it more than 3 stars right off the bat. Plus, Don and Rosie are back! ( )
  pmichaud | Dec 21, 2020 |
The Rosie Effect is the second book in the Rosie trilogy. You definitely need to read The Rosie Project first. In The Rosie Effect, Don and Rosie are married and have moved to New York City so that Rosie can go to medical school at Columbia. They are both surprised when Rosie finds out she’s pregnant. If you know Don, you can guess how well he deals with the unexpected.

The Rosie Effect was just as funny as The Rosie Project. The scene where Don gets arrested at a playground after he follows his friend Gene’s advice to “watch some kids” to figure out how they behave is particularly hilarious. However, I found the drama between Don and Rosie to be somewhat manufactured. I didn’t like Rosie much in this book and I liked her a lot in The Rosie Project. It didn’t feel like her character took an authentic turn in this book. That being said, I still enjoyed The Rosie Effect and I definitely recommend it if you read and liked The Rosie Project. ( )
  mcelhra | Dec 1, 2020 |
I hate when I read the second book before the first -- that's what happened here in my mad-dash library grab. So I wasn't familiar with the characters from the Rosie Project, but it was easy to catch up with them and their current status. Don Tillman, narrator, and "not average" has an approach to life that is uber-intelligent -- like off the grid and while he is called "autistic" and certainly has savant tendencies, it is unclear if he has ever been diagnosed or embraces that label. He definitely knows the things he needs to work on: reading facial expressions, expressing emotion, veering off schedule, and eye contact, but it doesn't seem to limit his work as a genetics professor at Columbia University in NY. Where is does challenge him is in his personal life with wife Rosie and her announcement of pregnancy. Using his bathroom wall tiles as a massive chart for the pregnancy's progress, he has the scientific situation in hand, but his missteps and social gaffes are what drive the book's conflict and hilarity. He is such a good soul and the cast of characters of his 7 friends add very humorous layers to the story. So many cringe-worthy scenarios, but Don know there is a solution to them all. Watching him arrive at them with his matrix-like thinking is all the fun. ( )
  CarrieWuj | Oct 24, 2020 |
First of all, I really enjoyed the first book - the Rosie project, where Don Tillman, a geneticist with mild Asperger syndrome, decides to find a wife by having women complete a questionnaire. Enter Rosie who is completely not what Don thinks he wants, they fall in love and get married. They move to New York from Australia and that is where this book starts.

Don has a job at Columbia University and Rosie is working on finishing her PhD as well as medical school when she abruptly informs Don that she is pregnant. To prepare for the baby, Don, who has appropriated the second bathroom in the apartment as his office (it has a built in seat and he can work at the same time as using the potty), decides that the wall tiles will make a great white board to document the fetal development while not upsetting Rosie with his clinical approach. This was the best of the book, IMO, it went downhill from there

There was too much going on - house guests, moving to a new apartment, being pickup as a pedophile, a psychologist with an ax to grind, rock stars. Just too much. I really wish that the author had reread the first book and kept the characters on the same path as they started.

I don't think I'll follow Don and Rosie and Hud in the future. ( )
  cyderry | Jul 2, 2020 |
Please note this review will have spoilers for book one. If you haven't read book one you may want to skip over this review.

I honestly don't know what to say about this book that i haven't already said in my updates.

I felt like I was reading about totally different characters based on events in book one. We had way too many plot lines. The pace was awful. I blame that on the zig-zag of the plot lines. One thing that Mr. Simison did well in the last book was he really got into great detail about New York. In this book, not so much. And the ending made me laugh. Not in a good way.

The overall plot to The Rosie Effect is that Don and Rosie married only a short time since the end of The Rosie Project are now expecting their first child together. There are also side plots dealing with Don having to clean up a mess he makes which involves him in therapy, hidden identities, a project at the school he is working at, trying to help his friend Dave, trying to help Gene, etc. If this book had just focused on the pregnancy that would have been enough. There was too much going on and most of the plot lines magically resolved themselves due to Don.

Besides the plot lines that ebbed and flowed throughout the book, we have the characters written inconsistently from where they were in the last book.

Case in point. Don was hilarious in the last book. A 40ish man who either has Asperger's or a form of autism, he decided to start The Wife Project (The Rosie Project) and ended up meeting Rosie and in turn started The Father Project in order to help Rosie find her biological father. There were lots of laugh out moments with Don and his comments that he made while talking to people, having his inner dialogue, and his confusion over romantic movies, and his feelings for Rosie. Somehow that is all erased in this sequel since we have Don acting so irrational and just plain dumb during parts of this book it was surreal.


For example, Don moves himself and Rosie out of one apartment in one morning into another place without discussing this with Rosie. The same Don who has to have a schedule for how to do things, on the different ways he knows he can cause Rosie to start to feel amorous enough to make love (they all involve Gregory Peck) decides to move himself into a basement apartment which smells of beer because it is an apartment that houses beer for a rock star that lives above.

Surprisingly Rosie takes this all in stride (I would not have), but flips out when she finds out that Don has told Gene (from the last book) that he could come and live with them in New York for a while (not a spoiler, is in the book summary) after Gene has left Claudia.

Now this is after Rosie has said flat out that she doesn't want Gene to live with them, that she can't stand him, and also they are expecting a baby so they need to actually focus on that. Don still invites Gene because he decides that's what best.

And this is pretty much the entire book. Don does a lot of things, keeps them secret or sometimes not from Rosie, and acts like Batman going around and solving other people's problems but pretty much ignoring the fact he and his wife are coming apart at the seams.

And though I cut Rosie some slack initially (the Gene thing would have made me murder Don) she started behaving so badly that I was done with her as well. She pretty much pushes Don out of being involved at all with her pregnancy and I think I was at 50 percent where I seriously said to myself did I want to finish this book and have it ruin The Rosie Project for me. Rosie was a bit hard to take towards the end of the last book, but I liked her character. She got Don a lot and she said outrageous things but seemed to get him and was in love with him. Apparently the Rosie from the last book switched bodies with another person because now she is nasty and horrible to Don due to the very things she liked about him in the first book.

And we have Gene. Gene who was a philandering piece of crap in the last book who redeemed himself is now in New York due to him returning to form. We get to read more of his horrible wisdom to Don and other's about women, babies, marriage. The only times Gene was not being annoying was when he was sticking up for Don though which was the only time I liked this character. And the way that Mr. Simison decided to just explain Gene's actions made me roll my eyes. I think he thought this would cause readers to like Gene or sympathize with him. Instead I was like who does something like this outside of a bad sitcom?

There are some other characters that I just don't even want to go into but will make an exception for the world's worst social worker who doesn't know Don but acts as if people with Asperger's or autism cannot be trusted to be married or to have children. I hated this character a lot.

And the pace. Wow. The pace dragged and dragged. I think it was because of the plot lines. I could not get a good feel for this book at all. The writing I have to say in a lot of places was just repetitive. I am sure that's because of how Don the character speaks and thinks, but I was tired of him listing out reasons why Rosie or someone could be acting a certain way. Or him explaining how to make drinks, food, wine, etc. It was like reading an instruction manual.

The ending when it came just made me cringe inside. It was so cliche that I was seriously embarrassed. Based on this being called Don Tillman #2 I have a bad feeling a third book is in the works. I plan on leaving that book alone and hoping over time I can forget this book in order to be able to read The Rosie Effect again in the future without this book tainting it. ( )
  ObsidianBlue | Jul 1, 2020 |
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The Wife Project is complete, and Don and Rosie are happily married, living in New York. But they're about to face a new challenge because, surprise! Rosie is pregnant. Don sets about learning the protocols of becoming a father, but his unusual research style gets him into trouble with the law. As Don tries to schedule time for pregnancy research, getting friends Gene and Claudia to reconcile, and staying on the right side of the social worker, he might lose Rosie when she needs him the most.

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