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Blind Descent: Surviving Alone and Blind on Mount Everest

af Brian Dickinson

MedlemmerAnmeldelserPopularitetGennemsnitlig vurderingOmtaler
802264,481 (2.75)1
"Former Navy rescue swimmer Brian Dickinson was roughly 1,000 feet from the summit of Mount Everest ... when his Sherpa became ill and had to turn back, leaving Brian with a difficult decision: should he continue to push for the summit, or head back down the mountain? After carefully weighing the options, Brian decided to continue toward the summit ... Four hours later, Brian solo-summited the highest peak in the world, but the celebration was short-lived ... Suddenly, his vision became blurry, his eyes started to burn, and within seconds, he was rendered almost completely blind"--Amazon.com.… (mere)
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Blind Descent is an incredible story you don’t want to miss of a man who continued his climb up Mount Everest even after those he had been climbing with including his Sherpa became sick and couldn’t go with him. Knowing how dangerous the climb is even with others with you and how almost impossible it is to survive without others didn’t stop this former seal from continuing to the top alone even after he suffered snow blindness. After all, he had trained and dreamed of doing this for a long time. The solitude is so intense though it can cause insanity. Yet he wasn’t going to let the loss of his sunglasses, the sickness of others who stopped the climb, or even his own eye problems stop him. He had trained to keep a steady pace, using the rest step method: step, shift weight, and pause for three seconds before repeating the process. He used his family’s names to help him: Emily, Jordan, JoAnne. Step. Repeat. Unfortunately, the loss of his sunglasses over the mountain side caused him eventually to go almost blind for a while. Against all odds his sheer determination, good health, preparation training and God’s help enabled him to be the only one of all who started to complete the climb successfully. ( )
  jothebookgirl | Jan 3, 2017 |
This book was given as a gift to a family member and I borrowed it. I didn't enjoy it. I am interesting in climbing and outdoor activity accounts so that wasn't the problem. My issue was that this book reminded me of something written by John Eldridge called 'Wild at Heart.' The basic premise is that men are somehow called by God to be wild, reckless and to take part in high risk activities for entertainment purposes. That if they don't do this then they are not being the person God has called them to be. That their families and those close to them should grin and bear it and support them in their selfish exploits to enable them to live fulfilled and satisfied lives. Then they can settle down for a little while and be the father and husband, until they have planned their next dangerous stunt that is and then they are off again as the family waits anxiously to see if they will return alive or in a coffin. Maybe that sounds dramatic but that is the reality here. I can understand why a non-believer would behave like this as they have nothing else to live for so why not spend a fortune risking their lives to get the maximum thrill in the time they are here on earth. But a Christian?

'I've gotten one recurring question from people who don't climb: 'Why do you do it?' For me, it mostly comes down to the way God has wired me. I have a deep drive to set big goals for myself and then strive to achieve them. If I don't, I feel like I'm not living my life to the fullest and becoming the person God created me to be'

'We talked about what it would mean for me and for our family, and we spent a lot of time praying about it and making sure it was the wisest choice for us at this point in our lives'

In addition to these types of statements, which make it clear that the author has already decided to put his own goals ahead of his role as a Christian husband and father, he later comments that his wife knew who he was when she married him as if to say that she has to tolerate it now because they are married. How can this type of activity be 'the wisest choice' for anyone in God's sight when there is no spiritual benefit whatsoever?

The reaction of his very young children should've been enough to make the author reconsider as they clung to him sobbing and wondering if they would ever see their father again. Let alone the huge cost of the expedition, I think he mentioned over $60,000! He had to take special time off work for two months. Did he stop this type of high-risk venture after Everest where he nearly died after suffering snow blindness on the descent, but begged God for help and received mercy? (This after he had summitted on his own when his companion turned back, having promised his wife and kids that he would put them first in any major decisions) Not at all, he continues leaving his family to climb various mountains seemingly having learned nothing from his near death experience. What will it take you might wonder?

The writing itself is okay. There is no bad language, sexual content or violence. The author does talk about his bodily functions in detail at times which was a bit much. There is a lot of unnecessary detail about other events in the author's life that are not related to the main story. He always emerges as the hero in those stories as well....

Maybe you will be surprised by the strong words used here but I think that this representation of manhood is actually the opposite of that suggested in the Bible by Jesus and others. The author has taken many Bible verses out of context to justify his trip but a simple reading of the Bible might have been better. We are called as Christians to take up our cross and follow Jesus, to die to self for the sake of others. The only time I would be excited to read about this type of adventure in the life of a Christian is if they inadvertently stumbled across it whilst engaging an unreached tribe on the mission field. Or if there was a Kingdom purpose in it.....I appreciate that we all have hobbies and that we are also given abundant lives to enjoy but surely risking one's live in this way with a wife and children facing emotional turmoil on a regular basis is not the way to go.

I don't recommend this book as you can probably tell.
( )
  sparkleandchico | Aug 31, 2016 |
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"Former Navy rescue swimmer Brian Dickinson was roughly 1,000 feet from the summit of Mount Everest ... when his Sherpa became ill and had to turn back, leaving Brian with a difficult decision: should he continue to push for the summit, or head back down the mountain? After carefully weighing the options, Brian decided to continue toward the summit ... Four hours later, Brian solo-summited the highest peak in the world, but the celebration was short-lived ... Suddenly, his vision became blurry, his eyes started to burn, and within seconds, he was rendered almost completely blind"--Amazon.com.

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