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Lost in Translation: An Illustrated…
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Lost in Translation: An Illustrated Compendium of Untranslatable Words… (udgave 2014)

af Ella Frances Sanders (Forfatter)

MedlemmerAnmeldelserPopularitetGennemsnitlig vurderingOmtaler
2801871,478 (3.94)24
"An artistic collection of 50 drawings featuring unique, funny, and poignant foreign words that have no direct translation into English. Did you know that the Japanese have a word to express the way sunlight filters through the leaves of trees? Or that there's a Swedish word to describe the reflection of the moon across the water? The nuanced beauty of language is even more interesting and relevant in our highly communicative, globalized modern world. Lost in Translation brings this wonder to life with 50 ink illustrations featuring the foreign word, the language of origin, and a pithy definition. The words and definitions range from the lovely, such as goya, the Urdu word to describe the transporting suspension of belief that can occur in good storytelling, to the funny, like the Hawaiian pana po'o, which describes the act of scratching your head to remember something you've forgotten. Each beautiful, simple illustration adds just the right amount of visual intrigue to anchor the words and their meanings"-- "An artistic collection of 52 drawings featuring unique, funny, and poignant foreign words that have no direct translation into English"--… (mere)
Medlem:scarecrowcity
Titel:Lost in Translation: An Illustrated Compendium of Untranslatable Words from Around the World
Forfattere:Ella Frances Sanders (Forfatter)
Info:Ten Speed Press (2014), 112 pages
Samlinger:Dit bibliotek
Vurdering:
Nøgleord:Ingen

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Lost in Translation: An Illustrated Compendium of Untranslatable Words from Around the World af Ella Frances Sanders

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Engelsk (17)  Spansk (1)  Alle sprog (18)
Viser 1-5 af 18 (næste | vis alle)
This was a fab birthday present from Emily, who probably realises I love both words and comics. I flicked through it happily last year, but have now sat down and deliberately actually *read* it again.

Beautifully illustrated, and full of fascinating facts. I felt like actually a lot of the words felt very translatable to me - if not into single words but into straightforward concepts. The idea of the German word which is literally grief-bacon meaning the weight you put on as a result of comfort eating after a break-up is just perfect. Other concepts are less concrete, and I think it's some of these I love best. Then there are the ones which make sense in a way, but are baffling in others. *Why* is a word for the length of time it takes to eat a banana a useful word? ( )
  lnr_blair | Jan 15, 2018 |
A nice fun read. I love words, so learning a bunch of unique words from a diversity of languages is just plain fun. ( )
  bness2 | May 23, 2017 |
¿Sabías que existe una palabra portuguesa, cafuné, que significa «acariciar con ternura el cabello de la persona que amas»? ¿Y que en sueco llaman mångata al reflejo de la luna, como un camino, sobre el agua?

Tal vez haya algún vacío en tu lengua materna para expresar esas sensaciones que parecen imprecisas o indescriptibles, pero no desesperes: este compendio ilustrado ilumina algunas de las miles de palabras, procedentes de todas partes del mundo, que expresan vivencias y emociones tan universales como difíciles de traducir.
  bibliotecayamaguchi | May 8, 2017 |
For the lovers of language, Lost in Translation is a compendium of words that lack an English translation; words that were created by other cultures to describe a concept or feeling that would require several words for English speakers to convey.

I think most of us are guilty of tsundoku - the Japanese word for buying books without reading them right away (basically, the Japanese word for "TBR"), and some of us have experienced the Italian commuovere - been moved in a heartwarming way when we've read a story that's brought us to tears. Readers of Tolkien, or just a really brilliantly written story have been to Goya - the Urdu concept of the suspension of disbelief that allows us to lose ourselves in lands with elves, fairies and vampires.

I could go on, there are so many great words here (my favourite might be the Dutch word struisvogelpolitiek, - acting like you don't notice when something bad happens - which is what I've been unable to do today after BookLikes being down 10 hours.) Each word has a two-page spread with the definition, an explanation of usage, and a beautiful illustration.

My only complaint, and what cost the last 1/2 star, is the lack of a phonetic pronunciation guide for each word. I'd really like to know the correct way to pronounce the Welsh Hiraeth (a homesickness for a place you can't return to, or no longer exists). I'm more than a little surprised that it didn't occur to anyone involved to include these.

A great addition to my language shelf and one I'll be referring to again and again. ( )
  murderbydeath | Oct 13, 2016 |
I am terrible at learning new languages but I do tend to glom onto words or phrases from other languages if I like the way the word rolls off my tongue, or the word seem to be the perfect word to communicate what I am feeling/ thinking/ experiencing. Reading this wonderfully illustrated slim volume, I was reminded of the cultural importance of language. I love how the Finnish have a word, "Poronkusema", to describe the distance a reindeer can comfortably travel before taking a break (which apparently is acknowledged as being around 4.7 miles or 7.5 kilometers). Yes, the word "Tsundoku" - Japanese for leaving a book unread after buying it - can be found in this book! While I doubt that I can find ways to incorporate all of these words into my personal vocabulary, some of my favorite new words are:

Samar (Arabic) - n. Staying up late after the sun has gone down and having an enjoyable time with friends.
Hiraeth (Welsh) - n. A homesickness for somewhere you cannot return to, the nostalgia and the grief for the lost places of your past, places that never were.
Vacilando (Spanish) - v. Traveling when the experience itself is more important than the destination.
Ubuntu (Nguni Bantu) - n. Essentially meaning "I find my worth in you, and you find your worth in me".
Akihi (Hawaiian) - n. Listening to directions and then walking off and promptly forgetting them. (I do this - go 'akihi' - all the time!)

A delightful read and did I mention that the book is wonderfully illustrated? ;-) ( )
2 stem lkernagh | Jun 16, 2016 |
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"An artistic collection of 50 drawings featuring unique, funny, and poignant foreign words that have no direct translation into English. Did you know that the Japanese have a word to express the way sunlight filters through the leaves of trees? Or that there's a Swedish word to describe the reflection of the moon across the water? The nuanced beauty of language is even more interesting and relevant in our highly communicative, globalized modern world. Lost in Translation brings this wonder to life with 50 ink illustrations featuring the foreign word, the language of origin, and a pithy definition. The words and definitions range from the lovely, such as goya, the Urdu word to describe the transporting suspension of belief that can occur in good storytelling, to the funny, like the Hawaiian pana po'o, which describes the act of scratching your head to remember something you've forgotten. Each beautiful, simple illustration adds just the right amount of visual intrigue to anchor the words and their meanings"-- "An artistic collection of 52 drawings featuring unique, funny, and poignant foreign words that have no direct translation into English"--

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