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House of Leaves af Mark Z. Danielewski
Indlæser...

House of Leaves (original 2000; udgave 2000)

af Mark Z. Danielewski

MedlemmerAnmeldelserPopularitetGennemsnitlig vurderingSamtaler / Omtaler
12,392315365 (4.11)2 / 503
Years ago, when House of Leaves was first being passed around, it was nothing more than a badly bundled heap of paper, parts of which would occasionally surface on the Internet. No one could have anticipated the small but devoted following this terrifying story would soon command. Starting with an odd assortment of marginalized youth -- musicians, tattoo artists, programmers, strippers, environmentalists, and adrenaline junkies -- the book eventually made its way into the hands of older generations, who not only found themselves in those strangely arranged pages but also discovered a way back into the lives of their estranged children. Now, for the first time, this astonishing novel is made available in book form, complete with the original colored words, vertical footnotes, and newly added second and third appendices. The story remains unchanged, focusing on a young family that moves into a small home on Ash Tree Lane where they discover something is terribly wrong: their house is bigger on the inside than it is on the outside. Of course, neither Pulitzer Prize-winning photojournalist Will Navidson nor his companion Karen Green was prepared to face the consequences of that impossibility, until the day their two little children wandered off and their voices eerily began to return another story -- of creature darkness, of an ever-growing abyss behind a closet door, and of that unholy growl which soon enough would tear through their walls and consume all their dreams.… (mere)
Medlem:James.Danzl.III
Titel:House of Leaves
Forfattere:Mark Z. Danielewski
Info:Pantheon (2000), Edition: 2nd, Paperback, 709 pages
Samlinger:Dit bibliotek
Vurdering:
Nøgleord:Ingen

Detaljer om værket

House Of Leaves af Mark Z. Danielewski (2000)

  1. 172
    The Haunting of Hill House af Shirley Jackson (macart3)
    macart3: Those who read the "House of Leaves" will recognize how the house also consumes people in "The Haunting of Hill House" and the feeling that there is something unearthly inhabiting the house.
  2. 91
    Råchokteksterne af Steven Hall (Liyanna)
  3. 50
    Huset ved stranden af Daphne Du Maurier (PandorasRequiem)
  4. 30
    Sweeny i træerne : roman af Flann O'Brien (Fenoxielo)
    Fenoxielo: At Swim-Two-Birds is the grand-daddy of all meta-fiction and House of Leaves owes a great deal to it.
  5. 30
    Gravity's Rainbow af Thomas Pynchon (AndySandwich)
    AndySandwich: Gravity's Rainbow = paranoia House of Leaves = claustrophobia
  6. 20
    S. af Doug Dorst (PaulBerauer)
  7. 20
    The Red Tree af Caitlín R. Kiernan (ligature)
  8. 20
    Vellum af Hal Duncan (MyriadBooks)
    MyriadBooks: For a sincere ambition to figure out what the hell is going on.
  9. 31
    Fiktioner af Jorge Luis Borges (fundevogel)
  10. 10
    Hopscotch af Julio Cortázar (sparemethecensor)
    sparemethecensor: Great experimental works where you get something different from the book depending on the order in which you read its pieces.
  11. 10
    Dave Made a Maze af Bill Watterson (aethercowboy)
    aethercowboy: Both works deal with a strange and deadly labyrinth that's bigger on the inside.
  12. 10
    Piranesi af Susanna Clarke (hubies)
    hubies: Piranesi is not scary, but in both books there is this mystifying, unpeopled world of impossible (and perhaps infinite) house-like space. Also: cryptic diary entries, unstable mind, short film as a plot device.
  13. 10
    How to Live Safely in a Science Fictional Universe af Charles Yu (sduff222)
  14. 21
    Myrerne : roman af Bernard Werber (guyalice)
    guyalice: The mysterious basement and the unending staircase draw parallelisms.
  15. 10
    Chunnel Surfer II af Scott Maddix (aaronius)
    aaronius: Another experimental narrative that takes you different places than ordinary fiction.
  16. 00
    House of Stairs af William Sleator (Cecrow)
  17. 00
    Icelander af Dustin Long (sduff222)
  18. 00
    You Should Have Left af Daniel Kehlmann (amanda4242)
  19. 00
    The Way Inn af Will Wiles (bluepiano)
    bluepiano: Another book with a protagonist who is deeply unsettled by the seemingly infinite building he is living in.
  20. 12
    The Third Policeman af Flann O'Brien (owen1218, ateolf)
    owen1218: It seems to have been influenced by this book.

(se alle 21 anbefalinger)

Romans (45)
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Bliv medlem af LibraryThing for at finde ud af, om du vil kunne lide denne bog.

Engelsk (303)  Tysk (4)  Hollandsk (3)  Fransk (2)  Spansk (1)  Italiensk (1)  Alle sprog (314)
Viser 1-5 af 314 (næste | vis alle)
A idea-laden and, at times, beautiful book in the postmodern literary tradition that can't be fully captured in text, which is to imply that it would have been eminently more effective as a multimedia work.

If you're a postmodern literature enthusaist and enjoy fictionalized academic writing, then you won't be disappointed. ( )
  quantum.alex | May 31, 2021 |
Little solace comes
to those who grieve
when thoughts keep drifting
as walls keep shifting
and this great blue world of ours
seems a house of leaves

moments before the wind

-Zampanò

Book reached for greatness. Book failed. I enjoyed it immensely up until the last couple of chapters, where it stumbled back into the safe and almost trite, but if you're going to open with the old 'abandon all hope, ye who enter here' (with a less common translation, even), best stick the landing. This book has some big, beautiful things in it, but it does not stick the landing. This is, however, the sort of puzzle box I love, and I will be back.

Since there are already nearly 72,000 ratings, and currently 6,708 reviews of this thing on Goodreads, I'm not going to go very deep into the weeds here. Rather, I am just going to list out some observations.

* This is not a horror story, but it is a story that loves to play with horror tropes. It is instead an extended meditation on life, death, narcissism, and whether love is possible in the face of those three things. (In this sense, the book largely succeeds.)

*Were I forced, I would say this belongs somewhere with the New Weird stuff, as genre goes. I am bad at genre games, though.

*There is pretension, oh yes. Also, gimmicks abound. The fourth wall will be broken in multiple directions. And it practically jumps up and down and screams about how smart it is in a few places. But the book does not deserve its reputation as a difficult read, unless you have trouble flipping the hefty tome around in the directions required to read it. When read straight through (reading footnotes and references to appendices as they are mentioned in the main text), the two/three parallel stories are pretty straightforward. This is an impressively literary book, and will be enjoyed more by people who have already read a lot of other things, but I don't see any reason to be extreme on reading prerequisites. But then, I hate it when authors underestimate their readership.

* In a way, this book is like a [b:Ready Player One|9969571|Ready Player One|Ernest Cline|https://d.gr-assets.com/books/1406383612s/9969571.jpg|14863741] for the nineties. Like everyone else who read this book and was alive in 1999, I cannot help but see a lot of The Blair Witch Project in The Navidson Record. The interactivity of the reading itself is not unlike playing Myst. Multiple references to The X-Files, various and sundry books and movies, and appearances by various celebrities make this a fun read.

*Oddly enough, I recently read another epistolic work based on film clips in [b:The Supernatural Enhancements|18782854|The Supernatural Enhancements|Edgar Cantero|https://d.gr-assets.com/books/1391307741s/18782854.jpg|26522334]. It’s interesting to me because the film clips provided a real sense of immediacy and danger in that book. Here, the film is distanced as much as possible: Zampanò constantly breaks in with his literary blatherings, Johnny sometimes interrupts to remind us that the film isn’t real (and constantly interrupts to catch us all up on his sex life), and the Editors occasionally interrupt to remind us that Johnny isn’t all that trustworthy. It’s a very different approach, and one that ultimately served to sever much of the emotional tension for me, unfortunately.

*How do you resolve the Red King paradox? Ultimately, it doesn’t really matter. The unreliable narrator/whose-story-is-this chicanery is a poor excuse for actually following through on all the many promises the main narrative makes and breaks. I actually think the book would have been better as a straight read. It is determined to be anything but that.

*This is a very male book, and I'm not talking about Johnny’s endless sexcapades. The male gaze in this book is walloping powerful. In his headlong rush to describe every kind of archetypal mother/lover myth, Danielewski does not seem to have ever stopped to ask himself how a sane, healthy woman would react to any of his archetypes. Lacking that understanding, he fails to raise any of his women characters to equal footing. The women are unable to hold up their half of the sky, and with that, the book fails. The love story/ies at the center of the thing just won't hold. Chauvinism, it’s bad for you. QED.

*Chad and Daisy are the most important characters in this book, and they get next to no attention, and no resolution. Book fail.

*I found that I loved Johnny, even as his constant sex bored me. I loved the place the book almost went with him. I loved the idea of the haunting at the close of his story, but that is cold comfort for the failure of the myth that was abandoned at the end.

* This is on the 1001 books list, and I find it bizarre. There is not anything particularly original here, and the story does not deliver on its promises as literature. The references are never fully tied together. Boxall’s folks seem to have trouble evaluating genre reads.

*Out of all the myths that are covered here, I find the equation of Jonah and Pelafina most interesting and least explored in the text.

*Can a photographer ever really be a narcissist?

*You've no idea how badly I want to put a David Bowie picture in here.

*I guess I'll go with Escher's House of Stairs instead, since Zampanò liked it.



Reviewed 1/27/2016 ( )
  amyotheramy | May 11, 2021 |
Warning this book is an experimental writing meta type book! - Just the kind of thing I happen to love. I couldn't help but compare it to Infinite Jest with its heft, copious footnotes, story line involving a movie. I must say I enjoyed this so much more.

The story is much more coherent than IJ and actually after reading it for a while I no longer was even comparing the two. The book's style *is* pretentious & highfalutin but the underlying story/concept (despite the fact very little happens) makes it readable. It's overly clever, yet somehow it comes off as brilliance (more the shiny kind rather than the smart kind) which brings a playful balance to that makes it delightful rather than unbearable.

Its genius lies somewhere in the juxtaposition of over the top nonsense and original ways to express thoughts/feelings.

An example of this was as the suspense grew, the pages had less and less writing on them. This created a frenzied/panicked pace to the reading flipping page after page to see what happened next.

In summary its not a book for everyone but it worked for me, and I know its one of those books that will haunt* me for a while.

*yes this is also a reference to the Poe album as I can't get it out of my head (see now I'm even thinking meta thanks MZD!) ( )
1 stem curious_squid | Apr 5, 2021 |
I've been wanting to read this for years now and I devoured it in a total of four days. Now it has left me feeling slightly unhinged. There was just So Much content and clearly not enough brain cells to comprehend all the content.

First off, the formatting of the book made me very uncomfortable (which was what I assume the author was going for). There were times there was so much text on the page it was almost difficult to follow, then the next page there would be one word, and the next page could be upside down. I never knew what to expect from page to page and the author masterfully had me on the edge of my seat while reading this. I've never read a book such as this before. Very unique in almost every way.

I'm still not sure I completely understand all the Johnny Truant and the Minotaur stuff but i'm not going back to read and find out. I have a basic understanding and that's all I need.

So, final thoughts...

Did I like the book? I think so. I've been thinking about it all day and what it all meant...but I think I liked it.
Would I read it again? No.
Would I recommend it to others? No (except if you like to be sufficiently Creeped out then Yeah go for it but prepare yourself)
Am I slightly uncomfortable with dark spaces right now? Maybe.

ALSO, Fun drinking game! Take a shot every time someone mentions The Navidson Record. You would definitely get alcohol poisoning.
( )
1 stem taleszofwonder | Mar 25, 2021 |
I rate this as a personal favorite because it gave me my very first panic attack stuck in a hotel room and totally oblivious to what was happening to me at 17 years old. ( )
  RNCoble | Mar 24, 2021 |
Viser 1-5 af 314 (næste | vis alle)
House of leaves by Mark Z. Danielewski runs to 710 pages: 13 pages of introduction, 535 of text, followed by three appendices and a 42-page, triple-column index.
tilføjet af KayCliff | RedigerThe Indexer, Hazel K Bell (Aug 4, 2009)
 
... let me say right off that his book is funny, moving, sexy, beautifully told, an elaborate engagement with the shape and meaning of narrative. For all its modernist maneuvers, postmodernist airs and post-postmodernist critical parodies, ''House of Leaves'' is, when you get down to it, an adventure story: a man starts traveling inside a house that keeps getting larger from within, even as its outside dimensions remain the same. He is entering deep space through the closet door.
 

» Tilføj andre forfattere (22 mulige)

Forfatter navnRolleHvilken slags forfatterVærk?Status
Danielewski, Mark Z.primær forfatteralle udgaverbekræftet
Fuentecilla, EricOmslagsdesignermedforfatternogle udgaverbekræftet
Santen, Karina vanOversættermedforfatternogle udgaverbekræftet
Schuenke, ChristaOversættermedforfatternogle udgaverbekræftet
Vosmaer, MartineOversættermedforfatternogle udgaverbekræftet
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Ingen

Years ago, when House of Leaves was first being passed around, it was nothing more than a badly bundled heap of paper, parts of which would occasionally surface on the Internet. No one could have anticipated the small but devoted following this terrifying story would soon command. Starting with an odd assortment of marginalized youth -- musicians, tattoo artists, programmers, strippers, environmentalists, and adrenaline junkies -- the book eventually made its way into the hands of older generations, who not only found themselves in those strangely arranged pages but also discovered a way back into the lives of their estranged children. Now, for the first time, this astonishing novel is made available in book form, complete with the original colored words, vertical footnotes, and newly added second and third appendices. The story remains unchanged, focusing on a young family that moves into a small home on Ash Tree Lane where they discover something is terribly wrong: their house is bigger on the inside than it is on the outside. Of course, neither Pulitzer Prize-winning photojournalist Will Navidson nor his companion Karen Green was prepared to face the consequences of that impossibility, until the day their two little children wandered off and their voices eerily began to return another story -- of creature darkness, of an ever-growing abyss behind a closet door, and of that unholy growl which soon enough would tear through their walls and consume all their dreams.

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