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1177 B.C.: The Year Civilization Collapsed…
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1177 B.C.: The Year Civilization Collapsed (Turning Points in Ancient… (original 2014; udgave 2015)

af Eric H. Cline (Forfatter), Eric H. Cline (Efterskrift)

MedlemmerAnmeldelserPopularitetGennemsnitlig vurderingOmtaler
8533318,661 (3.62)29
"In 1177 B.C., marauding groups known only as the "Sea Peoples" invaded Egypt. The pharaoh's army and navy managed to defeat them, but the victory so weakened Egypt that it soon slid into decline, as did most of the surrounding civilizations. After centuries of brilliance, the civilized world of the Bronze Age came to an abrupt and cataclysmic end. Kingdoms fell like dominoes over the course of just a few decades. No more Minoans or Mycenaeans. No more Trojans, Hittites, or Babylonians. The thriving economy and cultures of the late second millennium B.C., which had stretched from Greece to Egypt and Mesopotamia, suddenly ceased to exist, along with writing systems, technology, and monumental architecture. But the Sea Peoples alone could not have caused such widespread breakdown. How did it happen? In this major new account of the causes of this "First Dark Ages," Eric Cline tells the gripping story of how the end was brought about by multiple interconnected failures, ranging from invasion and revolt to earthquakes, drought, and the cutting of international trade routes. Bringing to life the vibrant multicultural world of these great civilizations, he draws a sweeping panorama of the empires and globalized peoples of the Late Bronze Age and shows that it was their very interdependence that hastened their dramatic collapse and ushered in a dark age that lasted centuries. A compelling combination of narrative and the latest scholarship, 1177 B.C. sheds new light on the complex ties that gave rise to, and ultimately destroyed, the flourishing civilizations of the Late Bronze Age--and that set the stage for the emergence of classical Greece"--… (mere)
Medlem:DancingFool
Titel:1177 B.C.: The Year Civilization Collapsed (Turning Points in Ancient History)
Forfattere:Eric H. Cline (Forfatter)
Andre forfattere:Eric H. Cline (Efterskrift)
Info:Princeton University Press (2015), Edition: Revised, 264 pages
Samlinger:Dit bibliotek
Vurdering:****
Nøgleord:Ingen

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1177 BCE: The Year Civilization Collapsed af Eric H. Cline (2014)

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» Se også 29 omtaler

Engelsk (29)  Spansk (3)  Fransk (1)  Alle sprog (33)
Viser 1-5 af 33 (næste | vis alle)
Don't let the title fool you -- civilization didn't actually collapse in 1177. Rather, several cities and city-states faced disasters of an unknown type at unknown dates for unknown reasons. The book is interesting as an overview of the Late Bronze Age collapse, but it doesn't tell much of a story. Despite the poppy title and cover, it's definitely better for grad students than for neophytes to the time period. ( )
  poirotketchup | Mar 18, 2021 |
Review of 2021 Revised and Expanded Edition which is about 20% longer. Years ago I read Robert Drews book on this topic and he did a good job explaining the many theories and counter-theories (better than Cline on the historiography). Drews concluded it was caused by changes in warfare, chariot fighting came to end due to foot armies armed with iron weapons and armor ie. the transition from bronze to iron. Cline says this theory has critics though it has a logical beauty. Cline rather takes a generalist approach saying it was multi-causal and cites complexity theory and that we don't have enough information to conclude anything for certain or a singular reason. This is likely true. Complex societies fail in complex ways.

I found the book challenging, the first 70% is background as to what was happening for a couple generations proceeding the collapse. It really goes into the weeds of late Bronze Age international relations (Cline's area of specialty). I sort of took it as a oblique lesson. The final bits are pretty good as he starts talking about collapse, but felt the whole thing could have been easily done in a 50-page essay but was padded with extraneous stuff. ( )
1 stem Stbalbach | Feb 7, 2021 |
On the whole I rather liked this work, however, I do have to agree with those who think that less was delivered than the title seems to suggest, as Cline spends more time on dismantling past arguments for the collapse of Bronze Age culture in the Mediterranean than he does in terms of providing an explanation. In as much as Cline offers an analysis it is to suggest that it was a series of unfortunate events that kicked out the supports of a system that was too interdependent and complicated for its own good, leading to failure.

Two thoughts come to my mind. One, while this system was involved, it probably was not very redundant, being more in the nature of a dozen or so single points of failure. Two, the shadowy war between the Hittites and the Mycenaean Greeks over predominance in western Anatolia of this period, which provoked the Hittite emperor to impose a trade embargo, may had even more of a systemic impact if this much-touted system was already in a rather ramshackle state. After natural disaster, drought, famine, and the like, maybe it only took bad political decisions by the major players to drive the machine into the ditch. This is particularly if the shadowy "Sea Peoples," who seem to have had a predominant base of folks from the Aegean islands, really were left out in the cold by this war, and decided to play their own hand. But this is just my stab at offering a hypothesis on the basis of what Cline thinks that we can reasonably say. ( )
  Shrike58 | Jan 2, 2021 |
An interesting quick summary of the interconnected world of the Late Bronze Age. But its treatment of the actual 1177 B.C. collapse described in the title was surprisingly brief, and relied for impact on readers forming their own analogies to modern day findings of climate change. I understand the archaeological record is brief and fragmentary, particularly as the written civilizations of the time collapsed, but I was left wanting another 50 to 100 pages — treating possible explanations for the collapse in chapter-length format rather than sections within chapters. ( )
  dhmontgomery | Dec 13, 2020 |
An interesting read that could have been edited down a bit more. It felt, especially during the first three chapters, to be like a PBS / NatGeo program that kept reiterating the same point over and over again. But, I enjoyed it and wanted to finish it. The ending made it worth it for me, in that he notes that while all societies can and have collapsed in the past, we today can "take steps to fix things, rather than simply passively accept things as they occur" (p. 179). It reminded me of Asimov's Harry Seldon in the Foundation series. Seldon was an historian who realized the galactic empire would collapse but he worked to make the collapse and rebirth of a new empire less painful and shorter in time span. ( )
  drew_asson | Dec 3, 2020 |
Viser 1-5 af 33 (næste | vis alle)
This book by Eric Cline is the first in the series Turning Points in Ancient History edited by Barry Strauss. In the words of Strauss, this series “looks at a crucial event or key moment in the ancient world”, and the series seems targeted—judging from this first book—at a broad audience of both students and experts in the field. Cline’s book takes as its crucial event the battle between Ramses III of Egypt and the so-called Sea Peoples in 1177 B.C., a point in history that marked the end of the Late Bronze Age in the Eastern Mediterranean. Cline is careful not to suggest that this battle alone was responsible for the wave of destructions dated to the beginning of the twelfth-century; rather, he treats this battle as a point of departure for addressing a variety of calamities—both natural and anthropogenic—that affected much of the Eastern Mediterranean and brought an end to the Late Bronze Age.
 

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Cline, Eric H.primær forfatteralle udgaverbekræftet
Belza, CeciliaOversættermedforfatternogle udgaverbekræftet
Strauss, BarryForordmedforfatternogle udgaverbekræftet

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"In 1177 B.C., marauding groups known only as the "Sea Peoples" invaded Egypt. The pharaoh's army and navy managed to defeat them, but the victory so weakened Egypt that it soon slid into decline, as did most of the surrounding civilizations. After centuries of brilliance, the civilized world of the Bronze Age came to an abrupt and cataclysmic end. Kingdoms fell like dominoes over the course of just a few decades. No more Minoans or Mycenaeans. No more Trojans, Hittites, or Babylonians. The thriving economy and cultures of the late second millennium B.C., which had stretched from Greece to Egypt and Mesopotamia, suddenly ceased to exist, along with writing systems, technology, and monumental architecture. But the Sea Peoples alone could not have caused such widespread breakdown. How did it happen? In this major new account of the causes of this "First Dark Ages," Eric Cline tells the gripping story of how the end was brought about by multiple interconnected failures, ranging from invasion and revolt to earthquakes, drought, and the cutting of international trade routes. Bringing to life the vibrant multicultural world of these great civilizations, he draws a sweeping panorama of the empires and globalized peoples of the Late Bronze Age and shows that it was their very interdependence that hastened their dramatic collapse and ushered in a dark age that lasted centuries. A compelling combination of narrative and the latest scholarship, 1177 B.C. sheds new light on the complex ties that gave rise to, and ultimately destroyed, the flourishing civilizations of the Late Bronze Age--and that set the stage for the emergence of classical Greece"--

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