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Third Daughter (Royals of Dharia #1) af…
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Third Daughter (Royals of Dharia #1) (udgave 2013)

af Susan Kaye Quinn

MedlemmerAnmeldelserPopularitetGennemsnitlig vurderingOmtaler
16015135,591 (3.8)4
Sneaking out of the palace wasn't one of Aniri's best ideas. But she's the Third Daughter of the Queen of Dharia-zero responsibilities and zero royal duties. She's just the backup daughter, in case her older sisters' arranged marriages-to take the crown or broker an alliance-don't quite work out. But once Aniri reaches her 18th birthday, she'll be truly free... and then she can marry the charming fencing instructor she meets for fevered kisses in the forest. But then the impossible happens-a marriage proposal. From a barbarian prince in the north, no less. And if Aniri refuses, the threat of their new flying weapon might bring war. So she agrees to the young prince's proposal, but only as a subterfuge to spy on him, find the weapon, and hopefully avoid both war and an arranged marriage to a man she doesn't love. But once she arrives in the sweeping mountains of the north, she discovers the prince has his own secrets... and saving her country may end up breaking her heart. This Bollywood-style royal romance takes you to an alternate East Indian world filled with skyships, saber duels, and lots of royal intrigue. THIRD DAUGHTER is the first book in the Royals of Dharia trilogy.… (mere)
Medlem:marina042
Titel:Third Daughter (Royals of Dharia #1)
Forfattere:Susan Kaye Quinn
Info:Susan Kaye Quinn, Kindle Edition, 348 pages
Samlinger:Dit bibliotek
Vurdering:*****
Nøgleord:Ingen

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Third Daughter af Susan Kaye Quinn

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» Se også 4 omtaler

Viser 1-5 af 15 (næste | vis alle)
A fascinating story with a good flow that captivates the mind.
It is a story of growth and secrets mixed with steam technology that makes this a wonderful read.
Definitely worthy of reading time. I am looking forward to the rest of the series. ( )
  lynelle.clark.5 | Mar 15, 2021 |
Indian Steampunk read while in holidays in India ( )
  wyvernfriend | Jan 20, 2021 |
This story was good, it was well written. You were not sure who you could trust and who was working against the princess. Plenty of twists and turns.
It is a complete story but there is a theme plot that will run through the three books. ( )
  izzied | Oct 29, 2020 |
(Originally posted on Word Cauldron.)

Continuing my quest this year of revisiting books I liked but hadn't reread in a while, and further closing out some series that had been sitting open for years on my to-read list, I reread Third Daughter, then went on to complete the Royals of Dharia series with Second Daughter and First Daughter. This rating is for this particular book, but this written review turned into more like a review of the series as a whole.

I had been wondering how the second and first daughters fit in to this since they are already married with children in the first book, and usually with these books it is about the protagonist finding her love, as it was with Aniri in the first book.

My hope was that I could come to terms with the confusing nature of the naming of these books. I constantly forgot that the first book in the series is the one that starts with "third," so sometimes when opening them on Audible I would pick the wrong one—at least the second one matches up with the second daughter so that's easy to remember.

Now having read them all, am I okay with it and has it been justified?

Eh. Not really.

The naming convention is unique and gets one's attention, but I don't think it necessarily needs to be a thing. It could be argued that it does at least mesh with the world that the author built, in that the numbering of children, particularly daughters, is very culturally significant, so I guess it is a mark for staying true to the world, even if it's confusing.

I thought the next two books, because they are titled for the other daughters, would have them as main characters, but they continue to follow Aniri's adventures and soul-searching with a little extra focus on her sisters:

- Third Daughter is about Aniri spying on Jungali and choosing between her love for Devesh and her growing feelings for Ash, as well as trying to understand her place in the courtly politics that surround her.

- Second Daughter is about Seledri being a target for assassination. Seledri is in the book a bit when they find her, but Aniri is the main protagonist and it's really about her trying to rescue of Seledri and her adventures associated with that.

- First Daughter is about Nahali coming into her own as Queen after their mother is injured by an assassin, but Nahali is barely in it (I think her "screen time" is about the same as Seledri's in the second book). Aniri is once again the main protagonist as she tries to follow through with her mother's instructions to disrupt the Samirian government from the inside to avoid war altogether. Her mother also tells Aniri to help Nahali become a good queen, but in the end, Nahali really does it on her own for the most part (which Aniri points out to her mother).

All that aside, this series of books is refreshing for me in two main ways:

- They are not all about each daughter finding a husband; in fact, Aniri and Ash don't even get officially married until the end of the third book. Instead, they are married in their hearts and understand that what matters is how they feel about each other and that they think of the other as their spouse, not that the union is recognized by a government or family.

- There were no magic or paranormal elements in these books. Don't get me wrong, I enjoy books like that, but a series in this genre that relies on none of that yet was still engaging and fun to read is an accomplishment. In fact, I think this is why they are so successful because it wasn't overcomplicated by a make-believe world that became unwieldy and unexplainable for the author.

This series is reliable, very well-written and edited, the world building and plot are just enough to be engrossing, atmospheric, and consistent, but don't go overboard with unnecessary complications or details. In particular, this author excels at describing clothing, rooms, scenery, and activities so these books really bring you into her world. I think my favorite was the description of the ceremony and dancing that occurs nears the end of Second Daughter. Gosh, that was a delightful read and almost brought me to tears with how touching it all was.

I thought all the names (male and female alike) in this book were beautiful, suited to the world, and well-chosen—they really added to the atmosphere, which I think is something not all authors are cognizant of (for an example of a fail in this area, see Witch’s Reign, as the naming choices in that book were one of my biggest complaints because they made no sense in the context of the world and distracted me mightily).

Character growth is, I think, logical and believable for everyone. Where the main character is concerned, Aniri is likable, although a bit tiresome in the second book and beginning of the third book with her inability to trust herself and her endless waffling over Devesh (who was clearly slimy from the get-go, used her, and betrayed her in multiple ways) and Ash (who clearly has her best interests in mind and wants to build a fair and prosperous future with her).

Overall, an enjoyable series (the audiobooks are excellent!) that provides a nice escape into a Bollywood-esque steampunk world with no major issues or complaints. ( )
  wordcauldron | Jun 10, 2019 |
A fantasy set in a steampunk version of India. This was actually very cool. The country wasn't presented as a monolith; each society's individual culture and climate were shown.

Aniri is the third daughter of the Queen, and as such she will be free to marry for love on her 18th birthday. Having seen her two older sisters marry for the good of their country, she is desperate to live her own life, far from Court. She's in love with a courtesan and they plan to marry and run away as soon as she attains her majority. But then her help is needed for the good of her country and of another. If she agrees to marry the Prince of a neighboring country she could help save both their countries; and this agreement would enable her to spy for her mother. Her plan is to accept the proposal, help the Prince attain his throne, spy for her mother, then return home unmarried to resume her planned life of freedom. Obviously, nothing goes as planned. Aniri learns more than she ever thought about her parents, her society, and her own self.

This book was fun. It was full of action, with well-written characters, and a main character I liked very much. Aniri was very well-written and believable. She was brave and naive, sometimes ignorant of things she should know, other times clever and perceptive. She was a mountain-climbing, saber-dueling, loyal and loving person. She was the lens through which we view her culture and the culture of the Prince, and she was open to and excited by new experiences.

(Provided by publisher) ( )
  tldegray | Sep 21, 2018 |
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Sneaking out of the palace wasn't one of Aniri's best ideas. But she's the Third Daughter of the Queen of Dharia-zero responsibilities and zero royal duties. She's just the backup daughter, in case her older sisters' arranged marriages-to take the crown or broker an alliance-don't quite work out. But once Aniri reaches her 18th birthday, she'll be truly free... and then she can marry the charming fencing instructor she meets for fevered kisses in the forest. But then the impossible happens-a marriage proposal. From a barbarian prince in the north, no less. And if Aniri refuses, the threat of their new flying weapon might bring war. So she agrees to the young prince's proposal, but only as a subterfuge to spy on him, find the weapon, and hopefully avoid both war and an arranged marriage to a man she doesn't love. But once she arrives in the sweeping mountains of the north, she discovers the prince has his own secrets... and saving her country may end up breaking her heart. This Bollywood-style royal romance takes you to an alternate East Indian world filled with skyships, saber duels, and lots of royal intrigue. THIRD DAUGHTER is the first book in the Royals of Dharia trilogy.

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Susan Kaye Quinn's book Third Daughter (The Dharian Affairs #1) was available from LibraryThing Member Giveaway.

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