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Breakfast at Tiffany's and Three…
Indlæser...

Breakfast at Tiffany's and Three Stories (original 1958; udgave 2000)

af Truman Capote

MedlemmerAnmeldelserPopularitetGennemsnitlig vurderingOmtaler
7,073202951 (3.84)67
In this seductive, wistful masterpiece, Truman Capote created a woman whose name has entered the American idiom and whose style is a part of the literary landscape. Holly Golightly knows that nothing bad can ever happen to you at Tiffany's; her poignancy, wit, and naïveté continue to charm. This volume also includes three of Capote's best-known stories, "House of Flowers," "A Diamond Guitar," and "A Christmas Memory," which the Saturday Review called "one of the most moving stories in our language." It is a tale of two innocents--a small boy and the old woman who is his best friend--whose sweetness contains a hard, sharp kernel of truth.… (mere)
Medlem:metheheather
Titel:Breakfast at Tiffany's and Three Stories
Forfattere:Truman Capote
Info:Turtleback Books Distributed by Demco Media (2000), Turtleback, 178 pages
Samlinger:Dit bibliotek
Vurdering:
Nøgleord:Ingen

Detaljer om værket

Holly, roman og tre noveller. af Truman Capote (1958)

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» Se også 67 omtaler

Engelsk (195)  Spansk (2)  Hollandsk (1)  Catalansk (1)  Fransk (1)  Hebræisk (1)  Alle sprog (201)
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I read this short story and watched the movie in my early teens. I adored both. But I had never gone back to re-read or re-watch them.

After re-reading the book some 35 years later, I had trouble figuring out what I originally loved about the book. Holly Golightly is this bad-ass, debonair, wild young woman living an independent, and what appears to be a very lonely, life. Her character is amazingly cutting-edge and the story risque for the time it was written. Perhaps young adolescent me was drawn to this risk-taker?

Much older me was saddened, however. What became of Holly? Did she find her happiness? Perhaps she was happy, but as the story is told through her neighbour's point of view, it didn't appear to be to him. Perhaps this is the real charm of this story - to question what is happiness and how do we seek it? What is freedom, and how do we achieve it?

I also love the feminist themes that arise from reading this book. I don't know that I could have identified those when I was younger. Holly's behaviour is racy and certainly counter-cultural. And yet if she had been a man, the story would have been normal and no worth reading. Why is that? And does this still hold for today? What would a modern Holy Golightly look like?

Now I am off to rewatch the movie...

( )
  ColourfulThreads | Feb 18, 2021 |
"Breakfast at Tiffany's" is one of those stories that is such a classic that I can't recall anyone actually ever telling me about it; it has just been there in my greater awareness for decades. Last night I was sitting in my armchair, and noticed a vintage paperback copy of it on the floor next to me. I've never read it before, so I picked it up, and gave it a go in one sitting (it is only 85 pages long, and small pages at that).

ENERGETIC POIGNANCE
Immediately you can see why it is famous. It has the poignance and attention to emotional and energetic detail that you also find in a book like "Anna Karenina." "Perhaps my face explained she'd misconstrued, that I'd not wanted advice but congratulations: her mouth shifted from a town into a smile" (page 44). It's exchanges like this—where, if we were there, much of the interaction would be perceived subconsciously so that we don't even notice it happening—that bring a surreal clarity to the work.

AMERICAN PRINCESS ARCHETYPE
And then there's the content. Truman's homosexuality has not deterred from the way he has captured the iconic 20th century American princess. The racism and sexism condemns this story as a barbaric 20th century beast. Despite (maybe because of?) Capote's bigotry, he has captured a certain archetype that has significant cultural weight.

Our protagonist, Holly Golightly, is a whirlwind. You want her attention. Her world is under the compression of a sound engineer; she's so blasé about bringing you into the intimate folds of her life, and simultaneously it is as though nothing matters. Due to your infatuation, this leaves you desirous of her affections, which come like rain during climate change—unpredictable and inundating.

With a fleeting fondness, I recall the Holly Golightly's I've encountered, in all their intensity, spontaneity, and ephemerality. The evenings splitting a bottle of red wine at the retreat house in the Rockies followed by a two-person dance party. The mornings in the shower, washing each other's bodies. Holding hands while walking across the park, wondering at the perception of onlookers. Skinny dipping in the mountain streams. Kissing on the half-erected frame of a barn at sunset. Picking strawberries under a midnight full-moon. Watching the way eyes and hearts follow them across the dance floor. The pastels of dawn after an all-night conversation.

There's a timelessness to these experiences, not just because there's no knowing whether the next fling might be a decade or a lifetime away.

Setting aside our wistfulness and psychoses of longing, it seems there's still something essential about the human experience that Truman relates here, somehow tied into themes of innocent awe—of one another and the world.

FIRST PERSON PERSPECTIVE
And then there's the easygoing storytelling style Capote utilizes. Its him, telling his own story. He didn't try to tell the story from someone else's perspective, which may be why he was able to tell something so exceedingly relatable—there was no translation across identities necessary.

The story has a nostalgic feel to it, due to it being set in the past tense, a recollection of the iconic years of youth; "There is a brownstone in the East Seventies where, during the early years of the war, I had my first New York apartment" (page 9).

I recently picked up my dogeared copy of "The Rolling Stone Book of the Beats." Reading publications like Bookforum and the New Yorker, it's easy to see the continuous strand of slick New York hipster coming through. And, at the same time, I'm left wondering—was Capote a beatnik? Was this story frame-breaking for the 1950s? This is something I don't know. ( )
  willszal | Jan 4, 2021 |
It at first seems unpromisingly light, but Breakfast at Tiffany's proves to be an excellent novella. The story of a New York socialite doing New York socialite things doesn't sound like the most gripping of stories, but the fully-realised nature of Holly Golightly's character quietly works on the reader throughout. When combined with Truman Capote's rich but robust prose style and the cool glamour of the Big Apple in the Forties, you're taken in.

I never would've thought I'd be entertained by a character like Holly, the sort of girl-woman where "you can beat your brains out for her, and she'll hand you horseshit on a platter" (pg. 28), but Capote manages it. Nowadays, in the influencer/e-thot era of vain young women, Holly's self-regarding personality is much more common (though Holly they ain't) and has morphed into something fundamentally dislikeable. But something about the glamour, the innocence and the whispers of sincerity attending Holly's story win you over, perhaps because it comes from an earlier age when women like this were mercurial, a delight, a change of pace. Their own mind rather than a likes-chasing hive mind. It's writing like this which helped give New York its reputation as a writer's arena, and, by the end, you are completely settled and comfortable in the story's setting and cadences. It's writing almost as comfort food.

The other three stories in this collection ('House of Flowers', 'A Diamond Guitar' and 'A Christmas Memory') pale in comparison to 'Tiffany's'. The writing is good but they all progress and end much as you would expect them too, and none come close to the headline story for engagement. In fact, their greatest use is as a reinforcement to the conclusion one must reach about the book as a whole: it is frivolous, but in the best possible sense, and shows great writing craft. Ultimately, this is a worthwhile read and short enough to be given a chance even if it doesn't sound like your thing. It might surprise you. ( )
2 stem MikeFutcher | Dec 20, 2020 |
This edition contains 3 stories plus the title story. “Breakfast at Tiffany’s” is memorable because the lead character, Holly Golightly, is so memorable. A free spirit with an almost elfish demeanor, her name, though acquired, is more unforgettable than the story itself. The story seemed almost unfinished in that style of so many stories written in the 1950’s.

The true gems of the book are 2 of the 3 shorter stories: “A Diamond Guitar” and “A Christmas Memory”, both magical and deeply satisfying. “A Diamond Guitar” reminds me in some ways of The Shawshank Redemption. Beautiful told in just the right among of descriptive detail, the reader can’t help but picture it in every sentence. I almost felt the chill of the stream as the two main characters cross it.

“A Christmas Memory” is my favorite of the 3. It is tender and beautiful, sentimental but not overly so. Again Capote has chosen each word carefully so as not to render the story too wordy or too sentimental. It’s the kind of story that will stay with you long after the book has been closed. It actually made me want to make and eat fruitcake, something I’ve never liked, because its importance to the story. I agree with the Saturday Review, which proclaimed it, “one of the most moving stories in our language.” Almost 70 years after it was first penned, it still retains that simple power. It’s not a knock-you-over-the-head kind of story, but more a drift-into-your-heart kind of story that once read will not be forgotten. ( )
  LoriFox | Oct 24, 2020 |
don't think you'll be reading a script from the movie -- the movie is based on the book but it's not exactly the same -- the coming of age or self acceptance or exploration of society and morality, blah, blah, blah, whatever you want to place on the story -- the characters are strong, each in their own way, the emotions are vivid, and the struggles are palpable ( )
  SleepyBooksandCakes | Aug 22, 2020 |
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This record is for books which contain the stories Breakfast at Tiffany's, House of Flowers, A Diamond Guitar and A Christmas Memory. Please do not combine editions containing only Breakfast, or with editions that have a different selection of stories.
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In this seductive, wistful masterpiece, Truman Capote created a woman whose name has entered the American idiom and whose style is a part of the literary landscape. Holly Golightly knows that nothing bad can ever happen to you at Tiffany's; her poignancy, wit, and naïveté continue to charm. This volume also includes three of Capote's best-known stories, "House of Flowers," "A Diamond Guitar," and "A Christmas Memory," which the Saturday Review called "one of the most moving stories in our language." It is a tale of two innocents--a small boy and the old woman who is his best friend--whose sweetness contains a hard, sharp kernel of truth.

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