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Finding Flow: The Psychology of Engagement…
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Finding Flow: The Psychology of Engagement with Everyday Life (Masterminds… (original 1997; udgave 1998)

af Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi

MedlemmerAnmeldelserPopularitetGennemsnitlig vurderingOmtaler
927716,828 (3.76)5
From one of the pioneers of the scientific study of happiness, an indispensable guide to living your best life. What makes a good life? Is it money? An important job? Leisure time? Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi believes our obsessive focus on such measures has led us astray. Work fills our days with anxiety and pressure, so that during our free time, we tend to live in boredom, watching TV or absorbed by our phones. What are we missing? To answer this question, Csikszentmihalyi studied thousands of people, and he found the key. People are happiest when they challenge themselves with tasks that demand a high degree of skill and commitment, and which are undertaken for their own sake. Instead of watching television, play the piano. Take a routine chore and figure out how to do it better, faster, more efficiently. In short, learn the hidden power of complete engagement, a psychological state the author calls flow. Though they appear simple, the lessons in Finding Flow are life-changing.… (mere)
Medlem:kvf4u
Titel:Finding Flow: The Psychology of Engagement with Everyday Life (Masterminds Series)
Forfattere:Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi
Info:Basic Books (1998), Paperback, 192 pages
Samlinger:Dit bibliotek
Vurdering:
Nøgleord:Ingen

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Finding Flow: The Psychology of Engagement with Everyday Life (Masterminds Series) af Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi (1997)

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> Dans cette suite de "Vivre", Mihaly (c'est comme un ami maintenant) nous propose des pistes pour maitriser notre energie psychique et experimenter le Flow. Alors il est vrai qu'il peut parfois être redondant avec "Vivre" mais je le qualifierai plus de complémentaire. --Danieljean (Babelio)

> Citations et Extraits (Babelio) : https://www.babelio.com/livres/Csikszentmihalyi-Mieux-vivre--En-maitrisant-votre... ( )
  Joop-le-philosophe | Feb 19, 2021 |
The more I read about psychology, the more I wonder how people can't smell the snake oil. I'm in a management development program and Csikszentmihalyi's work was recommended. Perhaps I got the wrong one. This was certainly a load of rubbish.

Opinions as fact, conclusions tailored to support the thesis, odd references to ESP and spirituality, the only thing I can recommend is he has a really cool name.

I pulled the thread on a few of the topics and felt my skin crawl reading up on "psychic entropy." I studied thermodynamics and can only feel sadness if these guys have to borrow terms from real science to legitimize the flimsiness of theirs.

Habitual readers of self-help tripe might like this book. Nuff said. ( )
  Razinha | May 23, 2017 |
Concept that our leisure can be active and passive; we can involve ourselves in short-term rewarding relaxation t-v watching with diminishing returns, or more fulfilling active study, learning an instrument, experimentation, or hobby where there is high-difficulty and high-skill.. In these situations it may require and initial investment of time before a sense of getting somewhere; the author refers to the sense of time-flying, as 'flow.' An 'Autotelic' person is one who has purpose on the inside, and isn't as much motivated by outside rewards, or is self-motivated; a self-starter. He suggests that a person learning music, to be a scientist, doing prayer/meditation, or working out, focus on building attention rather than the rewards that may follow from the discipline. Building attention and concentration will improve flow in said person's life. Highly interesting book with better core ideas than most, but with some filler and repetition. ( )
  timbrown5 | Sep 29, 2010 |
I found this book to be an enjoyable introduction to the concept of flow. The combination of self-help meets science, along with it's small size made the topic enjoyable and interesting. Despite the author's tendency to stray a bit far into humanistic realms than I choose to follow, I moved on to read this book's prequel: 'Flow'. ( )
  tyroeternal | Oct 16, 2009 |
Reviewed in my blog at http://www.sea-of-flowers.ca/weblog/sea/archives/2004/12/28/flow.php#more and at Blogcritics at http://blogcritics.org/archives/2004/12/28/191625.php

Flow, The Psychology of Optimal Experience(ISBN 0060162538 , published in 1990, has been influential in several areas of psychology including sports and leisure, game design and theories of creativity. The language of flow has taken hold in business psychology, and flow is coming into vogue as a metaphor of engaged living within the major religions as well as among more alternative thinkers. He wrote a shorter version, more directly aimed at the self-help or popular psychology markets in 1997, Finding Flow (ISBN 0-465-02411-4).

Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi was an academic clinical psychologist at the University of Chicago. His approach is based in humanistic psychology, so it impressionistic and oriented to feeling, and not based in neurobiology or cognitive psychology. His research is in the form of analysis of subjective reports and surveys, rather than standardized tests. His field of study was happiness. He gathered data on why some people take great pleasure in some leisure activities, and why some people can be happy in what might seem to be boring jobs and work situations. His answer is that people can become engaged in tasks, finding a pleasant flow in identifying challenges, meeting them, and being positively engaged in tasks.

People who are busy with a meaningful tasks don't have time to be anxious and depressed. Some people don't like their work but they like challenging recreational activities like mountain climbing and organize their lives around fulfilling hobbies.

This seems to be simple common sense, or common experience. Cognitive psychologists and educational psychologists have developed theories of learning based on balancing challenges to accomplishments within a scheme for increasing competence. He has gathered some evidence, albeit in the form of subjective reports, to support his argument. He doesn't seem to pay much attention to the cognitive work, and he presents flow as his own new, modern psychological theory. His theories about why complex and challenging activities are enjoyable and important in leading a healthy, happy life are interesting and useful, but the theory and the book have significant limitations.

The book is reasonably clear, but is not particularly well-written. It sounds naive and romantic, and it is full of the jargon of humanistic psychology (for instance concepts of psychic energy, psychic entropy, autotelic personality). He mentions the theories and main players in humanistic psychology , Maslow, Rogers, Allport, with some debt to Jung. In Finding Flow (the 1997 sequel) he tries to distance his theories from other theories and thinkers in humanistic psychology. I don't think he does that successfully. He mainly presents his theory of flow as method of self-actualization within the main stream of humanistic psychology. He also dives deep into dreamy pool near the end of his book, like all the humastic thinkers since Jung - mysterical insight dressed up as science.

His basic claim is that people are happy in activities that generate flow. He recognizes that people are also happy when basic needs are met in a pleasant way - good food, erotic sex, but he distinguishes between mere pleasure and the enjoyment of a complex experience. The mystical aspect of his work is that he advocates seeking flow in to the point of losing self-consciousness and becoming engaged in the flow of life.

His effort to distinguish between ordinary pleasure and enjoyable flow is largely semantic and largely unconvincing, and this false dichotomy is probably the key flaw in his philosophy. Flow is simply a feeling of pleasure. It rewarding, and like the other pleasures, it can be addictive. It is not an absolute good.

He tries to build a system of thought and live around flow. He holds that the complex pleasures of creating art, writing books, making music and climbing mountains are better than the simple pleasures of working people, and his project is the improvement of the lower classes by teaching them to find flow instead of watching TV. His biases are transparent. Like the other humanistic psychologists, he is working within a system of thought which aspires to imitate Stoic philosophy but seems more influenced by neo-Platonism, European Romanticism, some Indian and Oriental religiion and neo-hippie consciousness-altering mysticism. He basically implies that humanity will be enlightened if more people can be led from the low pleasures of common culture to the higher enjoyment of living in a state of flow.

I agree with much of what he says about living an examined and purposeful life. (I am obviously less enchanted with humanistic psychology which mainly a recycling of Romantic ideas and Eastern religion under the pretext of science). I think popular culture had become fragmented by the commercialization of sports and art, and by fluffy thinking. We are living in an era of bread and circuses. My criticism is that his system undervalues the simple pleasures of shelter, food, intimacy, drama, ritual and social living and values altered consciousness as a higher pleasure.

The Stoics felt that virtue is its own reward, while flow theorists seem to believe that anything that produces pleasurable flow is good. The author is more of a hedonist than a Stoic.

I think this book is useful in its discussion of the role of leisure and the importance of being engaged in fulfilling leisure activities. While his claims for the moral importance of flow are overstated, he is very persuasive in identifying the importance of using leisure time in challenging activities, and engaging in life with people, instead of sitting on the couch alone.

At the same time, ironically, his noble project has been subverted as his theories have been applied to design video games that are full of nearly addictive faux flow experiences, which remorsely consume precious time. The Playstation was released in 1994 and the psychology of flow has been a central concept of game design. ( )
  BraveKelso | Dec 26, 2008 |
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From one of the pioneers of the scientific study of happiness, an indispensable guide to living your best life. What makes a good life? Is it money? An important job? Leisure time? Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi believes our obsessive focus on such measures has led us astray. Work fills our days with anxiety and pressure, so that during our free time, we tend to live in boredom, watching TV or absorbed by our phones. What are we missing? To answer this question, Csikszentmihalyi studied thousands of people, and he found the key. People are happiest when they challenge themselves with tasks that demand a high degree of skill and commitment, and which are undertaken for their own sake. Instead of watching television, play the piano. Take a routine chore and figure out how to do it better, faster, more efficiently. In short, learn the hidden power of complete engagement, a psychological state the author calls flow. Though they appear simple, the lessons in Finding Flow are life-changing.

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