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Darwin's Doubt: The Explosive Origin of…
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Darwin's Doubt: The Explosive Origin of Animal Life and the Case for… (udgave 2014)

af Stephen C. Meyer (Forfatter)

MedlemmerAnmeldelserPopularitetGennemsnitlig vurderingOmtaler
283470,996 (4.38)2
Charles Darwin knew that there was a significant event in the history of life that his theory did not explain. In what is known today as the "Cambrian explosion," 530 million years ago many animals suddenly appeared in the fossil record without apparent ancestors in earlier layers of rock. In Darwin's Doubt Stephen C. Meyer tells the story of the mystery surrounding this explosion of animal life -- a mystery that has intensified, not only because the expected ancestors of these animals have not been found, but also because scientists have learned more about what it takes to construct an animal. Expanding on the compelling case he presented in his last book, Signature in the Cell, Meyer argues that the theory of intelligent design -- which holds that certain features of the universe and of living things are best explained by an intelligent cause, not an undirected process such as natural selection -- is ultimately the best explanation for the origin of the Cambrian animals. - Back cover.… (mere)
Medlem:mrbigwalt
Titel:Darwin's Doubt: The Explosive Origin of Animal Life and the Case for Intelligent Design
Forfattere:Stephen C. Meyer (Forfatter)
Info:HarperOne (2014), Edition: Revised ed., 560 pages
Samlinger:Science
Vurdering:
Nøgleord:Ingen

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Darwin's Doubt: The Explosive Origin of Animal Life and the Case for Intelligent Design af Stephen C. Meyer

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When I was sixteen I read a book given to me by a Jehovah Witness titled "Did Man Get Here by Evolution or by Creation?" It presented the idea of a roomful of chimpanzees pounding away on typewriters and wondered how long it would take them to produce the works of William Shakespeare. It also looked askance on radiocarbon dating. That book was in print from 1930 to 1985. "Darwin's Doubt" updates those concerns. It accepts the data collected by the paleontologists but finds fault with the conclusions of neo-Darwinism, punctuated equilibrium, evolutionary developmental biology, etc. Basically it comes down to a paucity of fossil evidence and conclusions that can be drawn from the "body plans" of the fossils that have been found and combinatorial inflation. The author explains the latter with a clever scenario: Would a bicycle thief attempt to steal a bicycle secured by a three dial padlock or a four dial padlock? Which would take less time to crack? Since we know how long life has existed on Earth and since we know a great deal more about genetics since Crick and Watson's discovery in 1953, more than Darwin, LaMarck, and Mendel ever did, its a mathematical impossibility that natural selection and gene mutation can account for the history of life.

Anyone interested in Intelligent Design and the controversy surrounding it should read this book. ( )
  JoeHamilton | Jan 19, 2021 |
This is a very good book by Stephen C. Meyer on evolution, intelligent design, the Creator, and the fossil record. The book explores the Cambrian Period and the Cambrian Explosion. At least 28 phyla came into existence in less than 55 million years. Some of these phyla appeared in the fossil record in less than 30 million years. If you divide 30 M by 3,500 M you get .009 or about 0.9% or 9 in 1,000. So in less than 1% of biological life on Earth, several entire phyla came into being. This is much too fast for NeoDarwinism. Intelligent design is indicated.

Darwin's Doubt is a book that I have read only the first 70 pages but it has a lot of science in those pages. I expect to read more of the book during the next several weeks. Part One is The Mystery of the Missing Fossils. The book discusses several models for evolution. Written on the college level and for the scientist and others who are interested in real science. ( )
  KSumerford | Mar 9, 2018 |
Meyer explains why neo-Darwinism is unable to account for the so-called "Cambrian Explosion." He argues that the sudden appearance of life-forms, and the information and systems that make them possible, is more plausibly explained by the theory of intelligent design.

This book, by the nature of the case, is heavy on the science. It is not light, bed-time reading. But effort is rewarded as Meyer presents his well-reasoned and strongly-supported arguments. Toward the end he explains why intelligent design is scientific and not "creationism" or a cop-out on science.

Speaking of the end, it came at about 55% or so on my Kindle. The remainder was Meyer answering critics of his previous book, Signature in the Cell, and footnotes. ( )
  Bibliophilus | Sep 30, 2014 |
This is the second of two major works by philosopher of science, Stephen C. Meyer arguing for the thesis that the evolutionary process is a designed process. The core of Dr. Meyer's argument in this book is basically the same argument used in his first book, "Signature in the Cell." Given the mathematical improbability of the complex, specified information such as that found in the DNA of every eukaryotic cell being created through the processes of random mutation and natural selection alone within the agreed upon time of our world (and the universe's) existence, some kind of intelligence appears to be a necessary component of the evolutionary process. In this second volume Meyer takes up one of the crucial problems that Darwin himself was very aware of. Namely, the sudden (in terms of geological time) appearance of multiple animal forms for which no common ancestor has been found or even successfully theorized is a major stumbling block for Darwinian and now Neo-Darwinian theory.

Meyer documents that it is not only intelligent design theorists who are convinced that orthodox Neo-Darwinianism has failed in its attempt to provide a viable explanation for the so called "Cambrian Explosion," but more and more biologists whose work is based upon the paradigm of materialism now reject the adequacy of the Neo-Darwinian hypotheses and consequently are working upon alternative theories of evolution, a development heralded by Stephen Gould's theory of punctuated equilibrium.

Meyer and his colleagues at Seattle's Biologic Institute (associated with the Discovery Institute) argue for the theory of intelligent design as a more scientifically adequate explanation for the evolution of life by applying the same abductive logic Darwin himself used in his theorizing. Since we cannot observe or duplicate macro evolutionary change (sans intelligent intervention), one must choose between theories that extrapolate from currently observed micro evolutionary phenomena that may be parallels to macro-level processes. Thus Darwin used what was commonly known from breeding practices in his day as well as his own observations of micro evolutionary changes gained on such expeditions as his famous Beagle voyage to postulate inter-special changes over long periods of geological time. In like manner, Meyer argues that given the fact that we humans instinctively attribute the events in our life that involve complex, specified information (CSI) to the involvement of intelligent actors (an email for instance), we are right to assume that the involvement of such information in biological processes such as DNA and some of the cellular engines that appear to be designed are in fact designed.

Whether one is convinced by Meyer's arguments or not, having read either this or the earlier volume of his growing corpus of articles and books, one will have no trouble recognizing the oft heard charge that intelligent design is nothing more than another form of creationism as the uninformed prejudice or dishonest propaganda that it is. And anyone who wishes to have some insight into the history and current theories of evolutionary research would benefit from reading this and Dr. Meyer's earlier book. ( )
  Jotto | Sep 14, 2013 |
Viser 4 af 4
As Meyer points out, he is not a biologist; so perhaps he could be excused for basing his scientific arguments on an outdated understanding of morphogenesis. But my disappointment runs deeper than that. It stems from Meyer's systematic failure of scholarship. For instance, while I was flattered to find him quote one of my own review papers (2)—although the quote is actually a chimera drawn from two very different parts of my review—he fails to even mention the review's (and many other papers') central point: that new genes did not drive the Cambrian explosion. His scholarship, where it matters most, is highly selective.
 
In short, Meyer has shown that his first disastrous book was not a fluke: he is capable of going into any field in which he has no training or research experience and botching it just as badly as he did molecular biology. As I've written before, if you are a complete amateur and don't understand a subject, don't demonstrate the Dunning-Kruger effect by writing a book about it and proving your ignorance to everyone else! Some people with creationist leanings or little understanding of paleontology might find this long-winded, confusingly written book convincing, but anyone with a decent background in paleontology can easily see through his distortions and deliberate misunderstandings and misinterpretations. Even though Amazon.com persists in listing this book in their "Paleontology" subsection, I've seen a number of bookstores already which have it properly placed in their "Religion" section--or even more appropriately, in "Fiction."
tilføjet af Taphophile13 | RedigereSKEPTIC, Donald Prothero (Aug 7, 2013)
 
Most absurd of all is the book’s stance on knowledge: if something cannot be fully explained by today’s science—and there is plenty about the Cambrian, and the universe, that cannot—then we should assume it is fundamentally beyond explanation, and therefore the work of a supreme deity.

But do not underestimate “Darwin’s Doubt”: it is a masterwork of pseudoscience. Meyer is a reasonably fluid writer who weaves anecdote and patient explanation. He skillfully deploys the trappings of science—the journals, the conferences, the Latinate terminology. He has a Ph.D. from the University of Cambridge in the philosophy of science. He appears serious and, above all, reasonable. The Cambrian argument has been a part of creationism and its inheritors for many years, but Meyer’s project is to canonize it, a task he completes with great skill. Those who feel a hunger for material evidence of God or who sense that science is a conspiracy against spiritual meaning will find the book a thrilling read.
 
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Charles Darwin knew that there was a significant event in the history of life that his theory did not explain. In what is known today as the "Cambrian explosion," 530 million years ago many animals suddenly appeared in the fossil record without apparent ancestors in earlier layers of rock. In Darwin's Doubt Stephen C. Meyer tells the story of the mystery surrounding this explosion of animal life -- a mystery that has intensified, not only because the expected ancestors of these animals have not been found, but also because scientists have learned more about what it takes to construct an animal. Expanding on the compelling case he presented in his last book, Signature in the Cell, Meyer argues that the theory of intelligent design -- which holds that certain features of the universe and of living things are best explained by an intelligent cause, not an undirected process such as natural selection -- is ultimately the best explanation for the origin of the Cambrian animals. - Back cover.

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