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Lee Marvin: Point Blank af Dwayne Epstein
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Lee Marvin: Point Blank (udgave 2014)

af Dwayne Epstein (Forfatter)

MedlemmerAnmeldelserPopularitetGennemsnitlig vurderingOmtaler
385506,314 (3.81)1
The first full-length, authoritative, and detailed story of the iconic actor's life to go beyond the Hollywood scandal-sheet reporting of earlier books, this account offers an appreciation for the man and his acting career and the classic films he starred in, painting a portrait of an individual who took great risks in his acting and career. Although Lee Marvin is best known for his icy tough guy roles--such as his chilling titular villain in The ManWho Shot Liberty Valance or the paternal yet brutally realistic platoon leader in The Big Red One--very little is known of his personal life; his family background; his experiences in WWII; his relationship with his father, family, friends, wives; and his ongoing battles with alcoholism, rage, and depression, occasioned by his postwar PTSD. Now, after years of researching and compiling interviews with family members, friends, and colleagues; rare photographs; and illustrative material, Hollywood writer Dwayne Epstein provides a full understanding and appreciation of this acting titan's place in the Hollywood pantheon in spite of his very real and human struggles.… (mere)
Medlem:Phibes
Titel:Lee Marvin: Point Blank
Forfattere:Dwayne Epstein (Forfatter)
Info:Schaffner Press, Inc. (2014), Edition: Reprint, 328 pages
Samlinger:Dit bibliotek
Vurdering:
Nøgleord:Ingen

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Lee Marvin: Point Blank af Dwayne Epstein

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Brisk read is a must for fans of the actor with a thorough look at his acting work and life on and off screen. The book presents a solid collection of quotes from both the man himself, and those that knew him. The author takes care to also offer some spot-on analysis of Marvin's best work, including Point Blank and The Dirty Dozen. The bawdy stories of Marvin's hard living are presented here as well and certainly make for interesting reading. Although some of the drunken escapades are funny, the author doesn't hold back on showing the darker side to Marvin's drinking and his behavior. To boot, the book's early chapters offers a sampling of Marvin's letters to his family during the war allowing the reader a glimpse of a soldier's life during that war. This section brings the book a bit beyond the average Hollywood star bio and adds allot of interest. From The Killers to The Dirty Dozen: The Next Mission, it's all here for the Marvin fanatic. A must read for those interested in the highly underrated actor. ( )
  Humberto.Ferre | Sep 28, 2016 |
There are plenty of movie tough guys stretching back over the decades, and then there is Lee Marvin, a man for whom the adjective badass was invented. In LEE MARVIN: POINT BLANK by Dwayne Epstein, we learn that it was no act, for Marvin was a true badass in real life. Epstein’s book is well researched, it boasts a long list of interviews he conducted with family, fellow actors, directors, writers, producers and drinking pals who were there from the early days when Marvin started out in summer stock through the years of Hollywood stardom when he could command seven figures for a film role.

For many of us fans, Lee Marvin’s movies and the stories of his hell raising in 60’s are well known, but Epstein gives us a look at the actor’s formative years, which laid the foundation for all that came after. Born in 1924, he was the son of a WWI vet and a Southern Belle from Virginia; Lee and his brother Robert were named after the Confederate hero. Both of his parents were distant in their relationships with their children and Lee grew up feeling that his father was emotionally repressed, while resenting a mother who placed great importance on social standing. Marvin himself was a rambunctious child who loved the outdoors and did not take to school work, partly because of dyslexia.

The molding event of Lee Marvin’s life, as it was for a generation, was his service in World War II. He was a Marine who saw hard combat in the Pacific, an experience Epstein believes left him with a life long case of undiagnosed PTSD. Epstein tells the story of Marvin’s years in the war through his own words, liberally quoting from letters he wrote back home to his parents and brother-the man was a very good writer and the reader gets a good feel for what he went through despite wartime censorship.

After the war, there was no way Lee Marvin could have put on suit and tie and sat behind a desk all day; his energy and creative nature led him to acting, first in summer stock and then to small roles on Broadway. Ultimately, he landed in Hollywood in the early 50’s where he found steady work playing villains in westerns and gangster movies. He was tall, gangly as a younger man, possessed with the perfect actor’s gift-a distinctive voice, and better yet, great physical presence which made the audience take notice whenever he was on screen. Lee Marvin was not considered leading man material in the age of Rock Hudson, but he made quite an impression on moviegoers playing bad guys in BAD DAY AT BLACK ROCK, THE BIG HEAT, SHACK OUT ON 101, and SEVEN MEN FROM NOW. He hated television, but did some of his best work there, including stints on Wagon Train and a now classic episode of The Twilight Zone.

The changing culture of the 60’s opened up new opportunities for him, starting with an unforgettable performance opposite John Wayne and James Stewart in THE MAN WHO SHOT LIBERTY VALANCE, directed by John Ford. His work as the title villain nearly over shadowed his formidable co-stars and it remains one his most iconic performances. This led to him being cast in Stanley Kramer’s SHIP OF FOOLS, where he had several memorable scenes with Vivian Leigh. Suddenly, after many years in supporting parts, his tough guy persona started getting him big roles as the old casting rules fell by the wayside. In THE KILLERS, THE DIRTY DOZEN, THE PROFESSIONALS, and POINT BLANK he set a standard that few would ever equal and made Lee Marvin the leading man of the cinema of violence. His cold hearted characters all suggested men with blood on their hands who had no interest in redemption-quite a break with the heroics of the past. Yet, he became among the very few to ever win a Best Acting Oscar for a comic performance when he won the Academy Award for CAT BALLOU.

There was the marriage to his supportive first wife, Betty, who gave him four children, followed by a tempestuous relationship with Michelle Triola, with whom he cohabitated for many years in the late 60’s. Their breakup, and abrupt second marriage to Pam Feeley, led to the infamous palimony lawsuit in the late 70’s, which only enhanced his reputation as a guy who lived by his own rules and didn’t give a damn. All through this are tales of Marvin’s epic drinking; “People don’t seem to like me when I’m drunk,” he is quoted at one point, for Lee Marvin could get mean when he was drinking. But for all the stories of his boorish and ugly behavior while under the influence, there seemed to be few, if any, who genuinely disliked him.

Many of us movie buffs truly love Lee Marvin, even after all this time since his death in 1987. We loved the man who threw hot coffee in Gloria Grahame’s face in the BIG HEAT, who tried to bully Spencer Tracy in BAD DAY AT BLACK ROCK, was one of the very few who could go to toe to toe with John Wayne in LIBERTY VALANCE, and led THE DIRTY DOZEN to glory. Epstein’s book is a true gift to us fans, giving us a wealth of information. Among my favorite parts is an addendum which lists the roles Marvin passed on or for which he was considered; this gives us some great might-have-beens: he contributed to the script for Sam Peckinpah’s masterpiece, THE WILD BUNCH with plans to star only to take a million dollar offer to do the musical PAINT YOUR WAGON; he turned down PATTON and was considered for the part of Quint in JAWS. Had he taken those roles, would his star have dimmed quite so much as it did in the post STAR WARS era of the blockbuster? There also an addition which lists the roles he have taken had he lived on into the 21st Century. How great would it have been if Lee Marvin had been around long enough to work with Tarantino?

I had the honor of visiting Lee Marvin’s grave in Arlington Cemetery on a Memorial Day a few years back, he was buried there after years of hard living finally caught up with him. Still, we felt he was gone too soon and he has been missed greatly. Dwayne Epstein’s book truly does him justice. ( )
  wb4ever1 | Nov 9, 2015 |
A cut above the usual movie star biography. Most movie biographies read more like filmography. Lee Marvin was a dysfunctional person who lived a chaotic life and made some outstanding movies. Epstein captures it well and provides a wealth of of background for the film aficionados. Absolutely. an incredible bibliography. ( )
  jamespurcell | Jun 1, 2014 |
It's hard to believe that Mr. Marvin left this mortal coil 25 years ago, but that's a fact. This excellent biography unearths a lot of little known background information of this iconic star. This highly decorated Marine Corps Sargent ( he survived 17 amphibious landings in the Pacific during WW II ) suffered mightily from undiagnosed PTSD and did what most veterans did back then...he came home and went to work. His journey is a fascinating read, and Dwayne Epstein certainly put the miles in to get the story. ( )
  rudeboy99 | Jul 3, 2013 |
This biography on tough guy actor Lee Marvin is well researched, easy to read, and holds your interest. I especially appreciated the slightly larger print that most books published these days. Author Dwayne Epstein talked to a lot of people (and the list is in the book) who worked with Marvin or were family members or friends. This type of input is essential to a great biography. We heard a great deal from Marvin’s first wife but nothing from Michele Marvin (of the palimony suit) or his last wife Pam. We also heard from many co-stars including Angie Dickinson, Jack Palance, L.Q. Jones, Woody Strode, Clint Walker as well as directors Budd Boetticher, Edward Dymtrk, Burt Kennedy, and John Frankenheimer, and so many others. We had some family history regarding Marvin’s uncle who was killed during Admiral Peary’s North Pole expedition as well as his father’s service in WWI. Marvin was a non-conformist who started young, running away from home at the age of 4 and attending numerous schools. He served in the Marine Corps and fought in some dangerous battles in the South Pacific where he was wounded and probably suffered from untreated PSTD his entire life. He discovered acting and had one Broadway appearance before getting to Hollywood. After years of struggle in early television and being the bad guy in films, he finally broke through and became a major star. The author really does an excellent job of covering Marvin’s life and what made him tick. I especially liked several of the appendices that included the list of the people interviewed that included the date and whether it was in person or via phone, the Unmade Films of Lee Marvin (films that he either turned down or was considered for but did not make), and the Films Marvin Could Have Made (which lists films such as The Untouchables, Million Dollar Baby, and so on that could have used Marvin if he had been alive). There is also a list of important dates in Marvin’s life as well as Posthumous Events Related to Lee Marvin. However, there is no filmography. I also disagree with the author’s take that Martin Scorsese as the greatest American director currently working. I hate Scorsese’s films and quite frankly, always preferred Marvin in his less violent roles such as in Monte Walsh, Paint Your Wagon, and Cat Ballou. Its too bad Marvin did not have the chance to do more comedy roles or roles as the mature romantic interest. I think he would have done both well. The book also has a nice afterward by Marvin’s only son. However, the unanswered questions I have are many – we found out what Marvin’s son is doing now but what about his daughters? What did Marvin think about being a grandfather? What do his grandchildren think of him now? How is it that the children of his third wife (who were not Marvin’s) received more of the estate that Marvin’s actual children? What is Marvin’s first wife doing now – she was interviewed extensively in the book? What is Marvin’s last wife doing now – she was not interviewed for the book? Did Marvin’s brother ever reconcile the salary Marvin earned as a film star with his own salary as a teacher? Did Marvin ever attend any “reunions” with his Marine buddies? The book gives us a good picture of Marvin but leaves quite a few unanswered questions. ( )
  knahs | May 1, 2013 |
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The first full-length, authoritative, and detailed story of the iconic actor's life to go beyond the Hollywood scandal-sheet reporting of earlier books, this account offers an appreciation for the man and his acting career and the classic films he starred in, painting a portrait of an individual who took great risks in his acting and career. Although Lee Marvin is best known for his icy tough guy roles--such as his chilling titular villain in The ManWho Shot Liberty Valance or the paternal yet brutally realistic platoon leader in The Big Red One--very little is known of his personal life; his family background; his experiences in WWII; his relationship with his father, family, friends, wives; and his ongoing battles with alcoholism, rage, and depression, occasioned by his postwar PTSD. Now, after years of researching and compiling interviews with family members, friends, and colleagues; rare photographs; and illustrative material, Hollywood writer Dwayne Epstein provides a full understanding and appreciation of this acting titan's place in the Hollywood pantheon in spite of his very real and human struggles.

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