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Emergence Christianity: What It Is, Where It…
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Emergence Christianity: What It Is, Where It Is Going, and Why It Matters (udgave 2012)

af Phyllis Tickle

MedlemmerAnmeldelserPopularitetGennemsnitlig vurderingOmtaler
1277166,927 (3.68)2
Whatever else one might say about Emergence Christianity, says Phyllis Tickle, one must agree it is shifting and re-configuring itself in such a prodigious way as to defy any final assessments or absolute pronouncements. Yet the insightful and well-read Tickle offers us a dispatch from the field to keep us informed of where Emergence Christianity now stands, where it may be going, and how it is aligning itself with other parts of God's church. Through her careful study and culture-watching, Tickle invites readers to join this investigation and conversation as open-minded explorers rather than fearful opponents.As readers join Tickle down the winding stream of Emergence Christianity, they will discover fascinating insights into concerns, organizational patterns, theology, and most pressing questions. Anyone involved in an emergence church or a traditional one will find here a thorough and well-written account of where things are--and where they are going.… (mere)
Medlem:MRML
Titel:Emergence Christianity: What It Is, Where It Is Going, and Why It Matters
Forfattere:Phyllis Tickle
Info:Baker Books (2012), Hardcover, 240 pages
Samlinger:Dit bibliotek
Vurdering:
Nøgleord:Emerging Church, Emergent

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Emergence Christianity: What It Is, Where It Is Going, and Why It Matters af Phyllis Tickle

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I have read so heard so much in the media and from here and there about Emergence Christianity that I felt a need to learn a bit more. This is an excellent book to get such a snapshot. I learned a lot about the diversity of what is called Emergence Christianity and understand a little better how it occurred. I am not sure I agree with the 500 year turning points described in this book, but the idea that every 500 years society, and the church, go through an upheaval and restructuring is intriguing, and we are, no doubt, in an era of great change. Time will tell what the church will look like in 100 years. ( )
  bness2 | May 23, 2017 |
This is a fine book on the status of Christianity in the throes of considerable change - a paradigm change to the last 500 years. Phyllis Tickle presents a snapshot in time, with color photos no less, of the striving by many people to create a Christin way that does not follow the Protestant way that has dominted a large stratum of Christianity for 500 years. Tickle has a wholistic approach which recognizes and honors older forms of Christianity, but also wants to catch the excitement of people on a trek into something of an unknown.

I checked this book out of a nearby library just to see what it says, but now I realize that I should keep a copy of it my library. In another 10 years, I might check in again. Perhaps even my local parish church will become emergent. ( )
  vpfluke | Feb 12, 2015 |
Context.

As a pastor, context is something I try to provide for people who are walking through crisis. It's difficult to see things in perspective when the moment becomes all-consuming. In Emergence Christianity, Phyllis Tickle does just that. She brings some welcome context to the current state of Christianity.

Changing Christianity

You don't have to be a pastor to see that the Christian landscape is changing. Shane Claiborne and the New Monastics are living communally while engaging in ancient liturgical practices. People as diverse as Mark Driscoll, Phillip Keller and John Piper are leading the Neo-Reformation revival. Hard-to-classify groups like Darkwood Brew are bringing a jazz-infused emergent message to the online theological sophisticates. The house-church movement in North America is stronger than its ever been. Homebrewed Christianity is a leading a surge of interest in Process Theology. The list goes on ...

In response to all of these options, it's easy to fall into dualism. We're tempted to think that Emergence Christianity (in whatever form) is either the enemy's greatest deception or the next Saviour of the world. People in ministry (like myself) often think in terms of whether or not this expression of Christianity is a threat to our particular brand. Phyllis Tickle brings some welcome perspective for those of us charting a course through the change.

Emergence Theory

Tickle begins by situating Emergence Christianity within the broader cultural shift. Emergence Theory explains how culture is changing. In an emergence, authority shifts from hierarchical to grassroots and the "resultant structural complexity is greater than what could have been logically predicted from the structure and substance of the composing parts" (33). Christianity isn't the only cultural institution to be swept up in this shift. You can speak of Emergent Judaism, Emergent Islam—indeed, Emergent twentieth first century life as a whole.

Since the shift involves all of life, it necessarily affects all brands of Christian religion. (Contrary to some people's impressions, it's not merely a collection of disgruntled white middle-class Charismatics!) We see the emergent impulse in Catholicism through the grassroots Catholic Worker Movement. You can interpret Azusa Street and the whole charismatic movement as an experiment in the decentralization of authority. What could undercut authority more than the allowing every member, through prophecy, to be a direct spokesperson for God?

Past, Present and Future

Emergence Christianity is a masterful historical study on the roots of this change, the current state of Emergence, and where it's going next. Tickle has managed to think and write clearly about a very complex and multifaceted cultural shift. This book along with its predecessor (The Great Emergence), has helped me to understand where the disparate forms of modern Christianity are coming from and, more importantly, where I fit in. ( )
1 stem StephenBarkley | Jun 24, 2013 |
Somewhat academic, Tickle gives a bird's eye view of Emergence Christianity. She begins by introducing the premise that there is a major shift in Christianity every 500 years, that can easily be observed over the past 2,000 years. Ironically, Brian McLaren refers to this in "A New Kind of Christianity". Today, this shift into a post-modern world and the ideologies that accompany it is called the Great Emergence. Tickle then gives a historical overview of Emergence Christianity, both the good and the bad. Surprisingly, Emerging Christianity is not a new term nor a new ideology, but its genesis can be found in the late 19th century and continues to evolve over a 100+ year timeframe to this day. Tickle then proceeds to define what Emergence Christianity is, what it is not, and the direction it is currently headed. Tickle explains that there is a distinct difference between Emergence and Emerging Christianity which is quite often mistakenly used interchangeably. Emergence is separate from any mainstream (or mother) denominational group. Whereas, Emerging is often still attached to a denominational or mainstream group, but often venturing to the outer edges and embracing some elements of Emergence. The best way that Tickle defined Emergence Christianity is found in the subtitle of Brian McLaren's book, "Generous Orthodoxy" which states: Why I am a missional, evangelical, post/protestant, liberal/conservative, mystical/poetic, biblical, charismatic/contemplative, fundamentalist/Calvinist, Anabaptist/Anglican, Methodist, catholic, green, incarnational, depressed- yet hopeful, emergent, unfinished Christian. This indeed is the confession and manifesto of Emergence Christianity. Finally, Tickle ends the book on her thoughts about the future of Emergence Christianity, including some self-reflective questions. For example, what will be used as the authority for Emergence Christianity? What potential struggles await? If we are truly seeing a major shift, how can the old and new orders fit together? Tickle gives her best estimation on each of these questions, and more.

Overall, this is an excellent book. Tickle tries to remain objective throughout this book to which she does a terrific job. But, she did take license in labeling some things as being "Emergent" where I am not so sure they are in fact "Emergent" (i.e. Azusa St., Pentecostalism). She also believes the rise of New Calvinism in recent years is a pushback or resistance to the rise of Emergence Christianity, which I too am not convinced is the case. Nevertheless, this book is an outstanding overview of Emergence Christianity and I highly recommend it to all who want to know what exactly it is and where it is going. ( )
1 stem gdill | May 16, 2013 |
A follow-up of "The Great Emergence," detailing more about the present shakeup, particularly the emergent/emergence movements, their doctrines, praxis, and the greater intellectual movements shaping such things.

Reading "The Great Emergence" first will provide background regarding the 500 year shakeup concept, obliquely mentioned in this book but not expanded upon in any depth. This book focuses much more on the shifts in Christianity over the past 200 years while providing a history of the modern emergent/emergence movements. The author is quite convinced that the future of Christianity in the world rests in these movements in whatever form they might head.

As a history of a movement in progress the author succeeds admirably. The author attempts to remain objective although her sympathy for the movement is evident. She does well at investigating the different strands of development, how they are alike how they are different, and how so many of them are part and parcel of the larger intellectual, cultural, and social developments and changes over the past 10/25/50/100/200 years.

Yet, as with any such book, what will happen will happen; perhaps the author is right in seeing emergence and/or emergent Christianity as becoming the big thing coming out of the present shakeup, or perhaps something quite different will manifest itself over the next few generations, if the Lord does not yet return. Those in the future will be in a much better position to sort out how the paradigm shifts will turn out than we are today. After all, what would speculators have concluded about the Reformation based on the situation in 1559, or regarding the Great Schism based upon the situation in 1094?

If you are interested in modern trends in Christianity, this book is an excellent read to come to a better understanding of the emergent/emergence movements. As to the future, we'll see. ( )
  deusvitae | Feb 13, 2013 |
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Whatever else one might say about Emergence Christianity, says Phyllis Tickle, one must agree it is shifting and re-configuring itself in such a prodigious way as to defy any final assessments or absolute pronouncements. Yet the insightful and well-read Tickle offers us a dispatch from the field to keep us informed of where Emergence Christianity now stands, where it may be going, and how it is aligning itself with other parts of God's church. Through her careful study and culture-watching, Tickle invites readers to join this investigation and conversation as open-minded explorers rather than fearful opponents.As readers join Tickle down the winding stream of Emergence Christianity, they will discover fascinating insights into concerns, organizational patterns, theology, and most pressing questions. Anyone involved in an emergence church or a traditional one will find here a thorough and well-written account of where things are--and where they are going.

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