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Dearie: The Remarkable Life of Julia Child…
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Dearie: The Remarkable Life of Julia Child (original 2012; udgave 2013)

af Bob Spitz (Forfatter)

MedlemmerAnmeldelserPopularitetGennemsnitlig vurderingOmtaler
5172235,666 (4.01)33
It is rare for someone to emerge in America who can change our attitudes, our beliefs, and our very culture. It is even rarer when that someone is a middle-aged, six-foot three-inch woman whose first exposure to an unsuspecting public is cooking an omelet on a hot plate on a local TV station. And yet, that is exactly what Julia Child did. The warble voiced doyenne of television cookery became an iconic cult figure and joyous rule breaker as she touched off the food revolution that has gripped America for more than fifty years. Julia Child was a directionless, gawky young woman who ran off halfway around the world to join a spy agency during World War II. She eventually settled in Paris, where she learned to cook. She was already fifty when The French Chef went on the air, at a time in our history when women were not making those leaps. Julia became the first educational TV star, virtually launching PBS as we know it today. Julia Child's story, however, is more than the tale of a talented woman and her sumptuous craft. It is also a saga of America's coming of age and growing sophistication, from the Depression Era to the turbulent sixties and the excesses of the eighties to the greening of the American kitchen. Julia had an effect on and was equally affected by the baby boom, the sexual revolution, and the start of the women's liberation movement. On the centenary of her birth, Julia finally gets the biography she richly deserves. --From publisher description.… (mere)
Medlem:mirrorlake
Titel:Dearie: The Remarkable Life of Julia Child
Forfattere:Bob Spitz (Forfatter)
Info:Vintage (2013), Edition: Reprint, 576 pages
Samlinger:Dit bibliotek
Vurdering:****
Nøgleord:Non Fiction, Biographies, Doorstop Epic

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Dearie: The Remarkable Life of Julia Child af Bob Spitz (2012)

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» Se også 33 omtaler

Viser 1-5 af 22 (næste | vis alle)
Thanks to this book, I was able to know more about Julia Child and now regard her as an idol and inspiration for me. Bob Spitz does a great job putting in context Julia's personal life and activities with what was happening in the world at the time. ( )
  ladyars | Dec 31, 2020 |
A comprehensive and entertaining biography of Julia Child, the grand dame of haute cuisine in the US. I learned a lot about her life, cooking, and the joy of an enormous appetite for adventure. It makes me want to try some of her French recipes now. Bon appetit! ( )
  DrFuriosa | Dec 4, 2020 |
I'll start out by saying I love to cook and bake. To the point that when I was packing up to move, a friend took one look at the row of boxes marked "Kitchen" and said, "It looks like Julia Child is moving."

So I was glad to find such a detailed biography. I didn't know until now that during World War 2 she worked in Sri Lanka for the OSS, which was the forerunner of the CIA. If you're like me and spend too much time watching Food Network, an organization quite different from the spy agency may come to mind - the Culinary Institute of America - but Julia Child worked for the spy agency. I also didn't know that she didn't start out caring all that much about food or in learning how to cook. It was her husband (whom she met in Sri Lanka) who was the foodie, and she started becoming interested in food so that she could cook for him. It didn't start out well - once she forgot to prick the skin of a duck to let the fat out and it exploded in the oven - but she gradually started improving as her sister-in-law started teaching her how to cook.

After her husband (who worked for the Department of State) was assigned to Paris, she signed up for cooking lessons at Le Cordon Bleu. While she was in Paris, she also made friends with several French women who loved to cook, and they helped her compile "Mastering the Art of French Cooking."

I was also struck with how much has changed with food since then. When Julia was working on her cookbook, shallots, leeks, and Gruyere were all unavailable in the United States, but now it's easy to find shallots and leeks at the supermarket, and I can usually find Gruyere near the deli section, with other imported specialty cheeses as well. And there has been another change for the better: no more insane combinations of processed food. During the fifties, "an editor's suggestion for a "Harvest Luncheon" included a recipe for Twenty Minute Roast, which featured slabs of Spam slathered with orange marmalade and a layer of Vienna sausages broiled with canned peaches." (Page 280). Just reading about that combination made me sick. Even worse, when Julia's husband was reassigned to Oslo, the welcome luncheon the embassy wives put on included "a cluster of grapes and sliced mushrooms floating in a kind of pink-gelatin amniotic sac with a crown of frozen whipped cream crusted with rock-hard fruit," with a cake-mix banana cake and lime Jell-O for dessert! Whoever came up with those must have had no taste buds, and I'm having difficulty imagining who thought it was a good idea to serve such things to Julia Child. Well, actually, to anyone...

I also found it interesting to read about the emergence of nouvelle cuisine: "Heavy cream sauces and overworked recipes were replaced with imagination and ingenuity. Fresh flavors were emphasized, new combinations encouraged. The revolutionary concept...called for far lighter and delicate fare - a white wine reduction, say, instead of flour and butter and cream, an infused oil, maybe, instead of, well, flour and butter and cream. Sauces underneath instead of obscuring the main attraction. Perhaps Asian accents, more spices and herbs; vegetables cooked only long enough to release their flavor, crisp to the bite." (Page 400). In other words, exactly what you see on "Chopped" right now.

This book also told the story of how the Smithsonian National Museum of American History got Julia Child's kitchen, which is now on permanent display, and which I got to see there.

However, the book is also very long and somewhat repetitive, and near the end I started getting the feeling of, "I just want to finish this." But I did enjoy it overall. ( )
  Jennifer708 | Mar 21, 2020 |
I'll start out by saying I love to cook and bake. To the point that when I was packing up to move, a friend took one look at the row of boxes marked "Kitchen" and said, "It looks like Julia Child is moving."

So I was glad to find such a detailed biography. I didn't know until now that during World War 2 she worked in Sri Lanka for the OSS, which was the forerunner of the CIA. If you're like me and spend too much time watching Food Network, an organization quite different from the spy agency may come to mind - the Culinary Institute of America - but Julia Child worked for the spy agency. I also didn't know that she didn't start out caring all that much about food or in learning how to cook. It was her husband (whom she met in Sri Lanka) who was the foodie, and she started becoming interested in food so that she could cook for him. It didn't start out well - once she forgot to prick the skin of a duck to let the fat out and it exploded in the oven - but she gradually started improving as her sister-in-law started teaching her how to cook.

After her husband (who worked for the Department of State) was assigned to Paris, she signed up for cooking lessons at Le Cordon Bleu. While she was in Paris, she also made friends with several French women who loved to cook, and they helped her compile "Mastering the Art of French Cooking."

I was also struck with how much has changed with food since then. When Julia was working on her cookbook, shallots, leeks, and Gruyere were all unavailable in the United States, but now it's easy to find shallots and leeks at the supermarket, and I can usually find Gruyere near the deli section, with other imported specialty cheeses as well. And there has been another change for the better: no more insane combinations of processed food. During the fifties, "an editor's suggestion for a "Harvest Luncheon" included a recipe for Twenty Minute Roast, which featured slabs of Spam slathered with orange marmalade and a layer of Vienna sausages broiled with canned peaches." (Page 280). Just reading about that combination made me sick. Even worse, when Julia's husband was reassigned to Oslo, the welcome luncheon the embassy wives put on included "a cluster of grapes and sliced mushrooms floating in a kind of pink-gelatin amniotic sac with a crown of frozen whipped cream crusted with rock-hard fruit," with a cake-mix banana cake and lime Jell-O for dessert! Whoever came up with those must have had no taste buds, and I'm having difficulty imagining who thought it was a good idea to serve such things to Julia Child. Well, actually, to anyone...

I also found it interesting to read about the emergence of nouvelle cuisine: "Heavy cream sauces and overworked recipes were replaced with imagination and ingenuity. Fresh flavors were emphasized, new combinations encouraged. The revolutionary concept...called for far lighter and delicate fare - a white wine reduction, say, instead of flour and butter and cream, an infused oil, maybe, instead of, well, flour and butter and cream. Sauces underneath instead of obscuring the main attraction. Perhaps Asian accents, more spices and herbs; vegetables cooked only long enough to release their flavor, crisp to the bite." (Page 400). In other words, exactly what you see on "Chopped" right now.

This book also told the story of how the Smithsonian National Museum of American History got Julia Child's kitchen, which is now on permanent display, and which I got to see there.

However, the book is also very long and somewhat repetitive, and near the end I started getting the feeling of, "I just want to finish this." But I did enjoy it overall. ( )
  Jennifer708 | Mar 21, 2020 |
Maybe 2.5 stars. After 120 pages I decided I didn't want to invest more time in this lengthy book. The author fills the pages with detail, some interesting but too much just seems to be filler. The main reason I'm not continuing is because I got tired of reading so much of the author's opinion stated as fact. ( )
  tkcs | Feb 23, 2019 |
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It is rare for someone to emerge in America who can change our attitudes, our beliefs, and our very culture. It is even rarer when that someone is a middle-aged, six-foot three-inch woman whose first exposure to an unsuspecting public is cooking an omelet on a hot plate on a local TV station. And yet, that is exactly what Julia Child did. The warble voiced doyenne of television cookery became an iconic cult figure and joyous rule breaker as she touched off the food revolution that has gripped America for more than fifty years. Julia Child was a directionless, gawky young woman who ran off halfway around the world to join a spy agency during World War II. She eventually settled in Paris, where she learned to cook. She was already fifty when The French Chef went on the air, at a time in our history when women were not making those leaps. Julia became the first educational TV star, virtually launching PBS as we know it today. Julia Child's story, however, is more than the tale of a talented woman and her sumptuous craft. It is also a saga of America's coming of age and growing sophistication, from the Depression Era to the turbulent sixties and the excesses of the eighties to the greening of the American kitchen. Julia had an effect on and was equally affected by the baby boom, the sexual revolution, and the start of the women's liberation movement. On the centenary of her birth, Julia finally gets the biography she richly deserves. --From publisher description.

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