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Bring Up the Bodies (Wolf Hall, Book 2) af…
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Bring Up the Bodies (Wolf Hall, Book 2) (original 2012; udgave 2013)

af Hilary Mantel (Forfatter)

Serier: Wolf Hall Trilogy (2)

MedlemmerAnmeldelserPopularitetGennemsnitlig vurderingSamtaler / Omtaler
5,6713181,361 (4.33)3 / 952
Though he battled for seven years to marry her, Henry is disenchanted with Anne Boleyn. She has failed to give him a son and her sharp intelligence and audacious will alienate his old friends and the noble families of England. When the discarded Katherine dies in exile from the court, Anne stands starkly exposed, the focus of gossip and malice. At a word from Henry, Thomas Cromwell is ready to bring her down. Over three terrifying weeks, Anne is ensnared in a web of conspiracy, while the demure Jane Seymour stands waiting her turn for the poisoned wedding ring. But Anne and her powerful family will not yield without a ferocious struggle. Hilary Mantel's Bring Up the Bodies follows the dramatic trial of the queen and her suitors for adultery and treason. To defeat the Boleyns, Cromwell must ally with his natural enemies, the papist aristocracy. What price will he pay for Anne's head?… (mere)
Medlem:reputablemerman
Titel:Bring Up the Bodies (Wolf Hall, Book 2)
Forfattere:Hilary Mantel (Forfatter)
Info:Picador (2013), Edition: First, 432 pages
Samlinger:Ønskeliste
Vurdering:
Nøgleord:Ingen

Detaljer om værket

Bring Up the Bodies af Hilary Mantel (2012)

Nyligt tilføjet afOswinsSouffle, ejmw, DonnaDeck, RSM_library, privat bibliotek, claytonhowl, zhlei337, Words
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Engelsk (310)  Hollandsk (4)  Spansk (1)  Fransk (1)  Tysk (1)  Alle sprog (317)
Viser 1-5 af 317 (næste | vis alle)
1 ( )
  ejmw | Aug 4, 2021 |
As I was nearing the end of this second volume in Mantel's retelling of Thomas Cromwell's life and work, I started to wonder if I would rate this the same as Wolf Hall. It turned into somewhat of a philosophical debate revolving around whether a sequel could be considered as good as an original, considering that so much of the heavy lifting (character development and background, setting the context and moods, style) was done in the first and needed be replicated so much as maintained. Certainly it didn't need doing from scratch.

So I was all ready to give Bring up the Bodies an uneasy four stars, uneasy because it really is great. Then, the penultimate chapter. In the last paragraphs as Anne Boleyn is about to be executed, I literally found my hand in front of my mouth. It was horrifying, and tense, and I didn't want it to happen but was powerless but to keep reading. I realized at one point I had been breathing very shallowly. It was more than I could have expected, and really. Anne Boleyn's fate is as much a surprise as the ship going down in Titanic.

Still, I have a nagging question about sequels that rely on the former volume for so much of the development which, quite frankly, make Thomas Cromwell on of the most fascinating literary characters of my reading life. The relationship to his father, still very present, and with his first mentor Wolsey, also still present, can't be redone for the sake of new readers, and we can't be given a "previously, on..." (though amusingly enough, in the dramatis personae, Mantel includes a sub-category entitled "The Dead"). What I realized was that Bring up the Bodies is as much a sequel to Wolf Hall as The Two Towers is to Fellowship of the Ring-- that is to say, not at all. It really is a continuation of a very long story (and also like Lord of the Rings, there is a third volume coming!) and shouldn't be read until Wolf Hall has been devoured.

That doesn't lessen this book in my mind. It really is just as good as Wolf Hall, and in some ways better, but even that isn't fair. Had I read this on it's own, I don't know if it would have been five stars, as Cromwell would have appeared fully formed with no sense of who he was and (because of?) where he came from. But read right after Wolf Hall? Perfection.

One thing more thing: I heard a complaint about how Mantel uses (or misuses, depending on who you ask) pronouns. I even read how it was "proof" of her attempts at being more literary. Her continued use of he/him/his can be nothing but intentional, and though it is disconcerting at first, I found it brilliant. She managed to provide characterization through pronouns. Brilliant. I wonder if anyone else agrees. ( )
  allan.nail | Jul 11, 2021 |
I've never read Thomas Cromwell in such a way as Hilary Mantel's portrayal of him. Although Cromwell here is still an enigma, Mantel humanized him and gave him a wicked sense of humor. This is an enjoyable read for any history buff interested in society and politics during the 16th century. ( )
  Squarepeg2021 | Jul 11, 2021 |
The Godfather Part Two Of Biofictographies

And by that I mean that it is even more enjoyable than the first in the series, [b:Wolf Hall|7826803|Wolf Hall|Hilary Mantel|https://i.gr-assets.com/images/S/compressed.photo.goodreads.com/books/1402448033l/7826803._SX50_.jpg|6278354], which was a spectacular tour-de-force itself.

Ms. Mantel has created a work of fiction based on a detailed knowledge of the life of Thomas Cromwell that, though written in the style of a novel, remains true to facts known about Cromwell's life and the surrounding environment of the court of Henry VIII.

Both the first and second books of the three-book series won the Booker Prize. Wolf Hall covers the period of Cromwell's career in which he transitioned from being Cardinal Wolsey's right-hand man to assisting Henry VIII in ridding himself of Catherine of Aragon, and in the process, gaining access to the Church's wealth that had previously been syphoned off by the Pope in Rome. At the conclusion, we see Anne Boleyn replace Catherine. Bring Up The Bodies covers the period of Cromwell's career in which Anne loses her control over Henry and Cromwell is charged by the King with her removal in favor of Jane Seymour, the mother of the Princess who became Elizabeth I.

Ms. Mantel skillfully brings to life Henry's court; even apart from the work as an act of imaginative history, the wordsmithing is really wonderful.

Well worth the calories!
  TH_Shunk | Jul 6, 2021 |
13. Bring Up the Bodies by Hilary Mantel
published: 2012
format: 407-page paperback
acquired: December
read: Mar 21 – Apr 11
time reading: 15:51, 2.3 mpp
rating: 4½
locations: 1530’s England
about the author: born 1952 in Derbyshire, England to parents of Irish descent.

Part of our CR group read, and part of my trail through the 2020 Booker longlist, which includes [The Mirror and the Light].

Considering how deeply I felt I needed to be into [Wolf Hall] to read it, and how long [The Mirror and the Light] is, this caught me off guard on how easy it is to read, how quickly it flows, and pulls, plot driving, Cromwell working. This book is a nice, fun, dark read. I had some issues with that. I liked the slowness of [Wolf Hall], and the intimacy that created, the forced close reading to catch when "he" meant, otherwise unnoted, Cromwell. Here, she writes, "he, Cromwell", which helps lessen the reader's need for attention.

I have trouble writing about this book. Cromwell is fascinating, I mean this version of him. And the way Mantel does it, she doesn't actually tell you what's going on in his mind. His physically unreadable stone-face is also his literary one, even as he still has flashbacks of intimacy. I imagine Mantel playing with reader. It makes the book distinct. She leaves a few clues as to who this Cromwell is, and how not-normal he has become, but mostly leaves it to us to analyze.

Mind you, this is the story of Anne Boleyn's fall, and all that came down with her, including, of course, her head. I have had moments where I felt like Anne, the world separating from me, undermining me, without my grasping why. I could relate to her as I could not to Cromwell.

A terrific novel historically and fictionally. Both distinct from [Wolf Hall], and building on it.

2021
https://www.librarything.com/topic/330945#7482753 ( )
  dchaikin | Apr 17, 2021 |
Viser 1-5 af 317 (næste | vis alle)
Here, as elsewhere, Mantel’s real triumph is her narrative language. It’s not the musty Olde English of so much historical fiction, but neither is it quite contemporary. The Latinate “exsanguinates” is a perfect 16th-century touch, and so is that final, Anglo-Saxon “gore.” In some of her books, Mantel is pretty scabrous in her descriptions of present-day England, its tawdriness and cheesiness and weakness for cliché and prettifying euphemism. “Bring Up the Bodies” (the title refers to the four men executed for supposedly sleeping with Anne) isn’t nostalgic, exactly, but it’s astringent and purifying, stripping away the cobwebs and varnish of history, the antique formulations and brocaded sentimentality of costume-­drama novels, so that the English past comes to seem like something vivid, strange and brand new.
 
Geen gehijg tussen de lakens in Bring up the bodies (Het boek Henry), geen hete kussen bij maanlicht. Toch is Hilary Mantels versie van de perikelen van de Tudors de meest opwindende ooit.
 
Is Bring Up the Bodies better than, worse than or equal to Wolf Hall? While lacking, necessarily, the shocking freshness of the first book, it is narrower, tighter, at times a more brilliant and terrifying novel. Of her historical interpretations, Mantel says in her afterword that she is "making the reader a proposal, an offer", but what is striking is how little concerned she is with the reader. Her prose makes no concessions to the disorientated: a moment's distraction and you have to start the page again. Mantel, like Cromwell, seems not to mind if we are there or not: she is writing, as he was living, for herself alone.
 
"Mantel knows what to select, how to make her scenes vivid, how to kindle her characters."
tilføjet af bookfitz | RedigerThe New Yorker, James Wood (May 7, 2012)
 
We read historical fiction for the same reason we keep watching Hamlet: it's not what, it's how. And although we know the plot, the characters themselves do not. Mantel leaves Cromwell at a moment that would appear secure: four of his ill-wishing enemies, in addition to Anne, have just been beheaded, and many more have been neutralised. England will have peace, though it's "the peace of the hen coop when the fox has run home". But really Cromwell is balancing on a tightrope, with his enemies gathering and muttering offstage. The book ends as it begins, with an image of blood-soaked feathers.

But its end is not an end. "There are no endings," says Mantel. "If you think so you are deceived as to their nature. They are all beginnings. This is one." Which will lead us to the final instalment, and to the next batch of Henry's wives and Cromwell's machinations. How much intricate spadework will it take to "dig out" Cromwell, that "sleek, plump, and densely inaccessible" enigma? Reader, wait and see.
 

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Though he battled for seven years to marry her, Henry is disenchanted with Anne Boleyn. She has failed to give him a son and her sharp intelligence and audacious will alienate his old friends and the noble families of England. When the discarded Katherine dies in exile from the court, Anne stands starkly exposed, the focus of gossip and malice. At a word from Henry, Thomas Cromwell is ready to bring her down. Over three terrifying weeks, Anne is ensnared in a web of conspiracy, while the demure Jane Seymour stands waiting her turn for the poisoned wedding ring. But Anne and her powerful family will not yield without a ferocious struggle. Hilary Mantel's Bring Up the Bodies follows the dramatic trial of the queen and her suitors for adultery and treason. To defeat the Boleyns, Cromwell must ally with his natural enemies, the papist aristocracy. What price will he pay for Anne's head?

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