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The Passage of Power (2012)

af Robert A. Caro

MedlemmerAnmeldelserPopularitetGennemsnitlig vurderingOmtaler
1,5473811,682 (4.59)93
Biography & Autobiography. History. Nonfiction. HTML:

WINNER OF THE NATIONAL BOOK CRITICS CIRCLE AWARD, THE LOS ANGELES TIMES BOOK PRIZE, THE MARK LYNTON HISTORY PRIZE, THE AMERICAN HISTORY BOOK PRIZE

Book Four of Robert A. Caros monumental The Years of Lyndon Johnson displays all the narrative energy and illuminating insight that led the Times of London to acclaim it as one of the truly great political biographies of the modern age. A masterpiece.
 
The Passage of Power follows Lyndon Johnson through both the most frustrating and the most triumphant periods of his career1958 to1964. It is a time that would see him trade the extraordinary power he had created for himself as Senate Majority Leader for what became the wretched powerlessness of a Vice President in an administration that disdained and distrusted him. Yet it was, as well, the time in which the presidency, the goal he had always pursued, would be thrust upon him in the moment it took an assassins bullet to reach its mark.
By 1958, as Johnson began to maneuver for the presidency, he was known as one of the most brilliant politicians of his time, the greatest Senate Leader in our history. But the 1960 nomination would go to the young senator from Massachusetts, John F. Kennedy. Caro gives us an unparalleled account of the machinations behind both the nomination and Kennedys decision to offer Johnson the vice presidency, revealing the extent of Robert Kennedys efforts to force Johnson off the ticket. With the consummate skill of a master storyteller, he exposes the savage animosity between Johnson and Kennedys younger brother, portraying one of Americas great political feuds. Yet Robert Kennedys overt contempt for Johnson was only part of the burden of humiliation and isolation he bore as Vice President. With a singular understanding of Johnsons heart and mind, Caro describes what it was like for this mighty politician to find himself altogether powerless in a world in which power is the crucial commodity. 
For the first time, in Caros breathtakingly vivid narrative, we see the Kennedy assassination through Lyndon Johnsons eyes. We watch Johnson step into the presidency, inheriting a staff fiercely loyal to his slain predecessor; a Congress determined to retain its power over the executive branch; and a nation in shock and mourning. We see how within weeksgrasping the reins of the presidency with supreme masteryhe propels through Congress essential legislation that at the time of Kennedys death seemed hopelessly logjammed and seizes on a dormant Kennedy program to create the revolutionary War on Poverty. Caro makes clear how the political genius with which Johnson had ruled the Senate now enabled him to make the presidency wholly his own. This was without doubt Johnsons finest hour, before his aspirations and accomplishments were overshadowed and eroded by the trap of Vietnam.
In its exploration of this pivotal period in Johnsons lifeand in the life of the nationThe Passage of Power is not only the story of how he surmounted unprecedented obstacles in order to fulfill the highest purpose of the presidency but is, as well, a revelation of both the pragmatic potential in the presidency and what can be accomplished when the chief executive has the vision and determination to move beyond the pragmatic and initiate programs designed to transform a nation. It is an epic story told with a depth of detail possible only through the peerless research that forms the foundation of Robert Caros work, confirming Nicholas von...

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Viser 1-5 af 38 (næste | vis alle)
It's so frustrating to end the series (so far) on such an interesting point in history. Caro once again does better than anyone in neither lionizing nor demonizing LBJ, but just giving you the reality of history and letting you judge for yourself. I appreciate how thoroughly Caro goes to make sure he's gotten accounts from everyone he can so disputed stories have both sides told. We barely cover any of LBJ's presidency in this volume, merely the first 6 months or so after JFK is assassinated. But that alone is so insightful to LBJ's presidency to come. ( )
  James_Knupp | Sep 20, 2023 |
Lyndon Baines Johnson was a horrible person. Yet there are certain aspects of his life that make Johnson a pitiable figure. He was abrasive, a cheat, and most definitely a bully. Yet, he made certain achievements in the history of the United States that is the work of a giant of a man.

Robert Caro’s massive biography of Johnson (this is volume four of at least five, one yet to be published; this is the only one I've read) is a wonder. Caro takes what is otherwise a stodgy, boring subject and turns out a thriller. First, Caro covers the history of Johnson's childhood, which left a lasting impact on his fears and his political policies. Then, his iron first control of the senate in which he was alternately both thrall and master, depending on the need. Johnson's fears of failure as a presidential candidate led to Kennedy's nomination and subsequent election in 1960. A lonely three years followed for Johnson, as the vice presidency suffers only fools. However, after the tragedy of Kennedy's assassination, Johnson proved himself as anything but a fool. A masterful transition allowed him to pass not just an amazing tax cut and budget reduction, but civil rights legislation that was unprecedented.

And so the book ends. In it, a portrait is painted of a man who could only just barely keep his anger tapped down, yet when he entered the pressure cooker himself he responded like only a few people could. Lyndon Johnson was supremely human. Angry, but gentle. A cheat, a liar, and a bully, but also a man that gave so many Americans the lives and hope that they'd always deserved. Caro cuts through not only the political machine to find the substances and explanations of machinations, but also through the myth to see the intricate president inside. ( )
  gideonslife | Jan 5, 2023 |
Every volume in this series has been fantastic. I cannot wait for the fifth and purported final edition. ( )
  MarkMad | Jul 14, 2021 |
I began my journey through Caro's four volumes of "The Years of Lyndon Johnson" on June 10, 2018. Today is September 6, 2018. So for almost three months I've plowed through the 2,500 pages ... and relished every page. The series is a monumental achievement, and as Caro says, what began as a planned 3-volume work, later stretched to four volumes and, now, he said to Brian Lamb of C-Span, he hopes he can finish a fifth volume: "Well, I've done almost all of the research already. I've written about 400 typed pages of it. I have one more big thing of research to do" ... and that is to visit Vietnam.

I hope so too. And I can't wait to get my hands on it. ( )
  markburris | Jul 11, 2021 |
Caro's narrative is absolutely astonishing in its detail, in this and previous volumes, describing in sufficient depth the people and contextual details that make sense of and provide a framework for understanding not only what LBJ did, but why, how, and importantly with or against whom. This book charts the political battles that led to his surprising acceptance of the vice president nomination and ultimate election, and his subsequent sidelining in the Kennedy administration. Only in this volume did I realize that an as yet unpublished 5th book is forthcoming. Given the amazing transformation of LBJ from an all but discarded and humiliated vice president to a masterful, decisive, and effective President, the denouement of this known saga will inevitably be sad and dispiriting. Can't wait! ( )
  wildh2o | Jul 10, 2021 |
Viser 1-5 af 38 (næste | vis alle)
Robert Caro’s epic biography of Lyndon Johnson—this is the fourth volume of a planned five—was originally conceived and has been largely executed as a study of power. But this volume has been overtaken by a more pressing theme. It is a study in hate. The book’s impressive architectonics come from the way everything is structured around two poles or pillars—Lyndon Johnson and Robert Kennedy, radiating reciprocal hostilities at every step of the story. Caro calls it “perhaps the greatest blood feud of American politics in the twentieth century.” With some reservations about the word “blood,” one has to concede that Caro makes good his claim for this dynamic in the tale he has to tell.
 
What he did to advance civil rights and equal opportunity was too important. I remain grateful to him. L.B.J. got to me, and after all these years, he still does. With this fascinating and meticulous account of how and why he did it, Robert Caro has once again done America a great service.
 
At the heart of “The Passage of Power,” the latest installment of Robert A. Caro’s magisterial biography of Johnson, is the story of how he was catapulted to the White House in the wake of Kennedy’s assassination, how he steadied and reassured a shell-shocked nation, and how he used his potent political skills and the momentum generated by Kennedy’s death to push through Congress his predecessor’s stalled tax-cut bill and civil rights legislation and to lay the groundwork for his own revolutionary “war on poverty.”

It’s a breathtakingly dramatic story about a pivotal moment in United States history, and just as Johnson used his accumulated knowledge of the art of power to push the nation along the path he’d envisioned, so in these pages does Mr. Caro use the intimate knowledge of Johnson he’s acquired over 36 years to tell that story with consummate artistry and ardor, demonstrating a tirelessness — in his interviewing and dissection of voluminous archives — that rivals his subject’s.
tilføjet af kidzdoc | RedigerNew York Times, Michiko Kakutani (Apr 30, 2012)
 
Caro’s treatment of the 1962 Cuban missile crisis—and of the roles that Johnson and the Kennedy brothers (especially Robert Kennedy) played in the crisis—is, on several levels, simply wrong.
 
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(Introduction) Air Force One, the President's plane, is divided, behind the crew's cockpit, into three compartments.
When he was young - seventeen and eighteen years old - Lyndon Johnson worked on a road gang that was building a highway (an unpaved highway: roads in the isolated, impoverished Texas Hill Country weren't paved in the 1920s) between Johnson City and Austin.
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Biography & Autobiography. History. Nonfiction. HTML:

WINNER OF THE NATIONAL BOOK CRITICS CIRCLE AWARD, THE LOS ANGELES TIMES BOOK PRIZE, THE MARK LYNTON HISTORY PRIZE, THE AMERICAN HISTORY BOOK PRIZE

Book Four of Robert A. Caros monumental The Years of Lyndon Johnson displays all the narrative energy and illuminating insight that led the Times of London to acclaim it as one of the truly great political biographies of the modern age. A masterpiece.
 
The Passage of Power follows Lyndon Johnson through both the most frustrating and the most triumphant periods of his career1958 to1964. It is a time that would see him trade the extraordinary power he had created for himself as Senate Majority Leader for what became the wretched powerlessness of a Vice President in an administration that disdained and distrusted him. Yet it was, as well, the time in which the presidency, the goal he had always pursued, would be thrust upon him in the moment it took an assassins bullet to reach its mark.
By 1958, as Johnson began to maneuver for the presidency, he was known as one of the most brilliant politicians of his time, the greatest Senate Leader in our history. But the 1960 nomination would go to the young senator from Massachusetts, John F. Kennedy. Caro gives us an unparalleled account of the machinations behind both the nomination and Kennedys decision to offer Johnson the vice presidency, revealing the extent of Robert Kennedys efforts to force Johnson off the ticket. With the consummate skill of a master storyteller, he exposes the savage animosity between Johnson and Kennedys younger brother, portraying one of Americas great political feuds. Yet Robert Kennedys overt contempt for Johnson was only part of the burden of humiliation and isolation he bore as Vice President. With a singular understanding of Johnsons heart and mind, Caro describes what it was like for this mighty politician to find himself altogether powerless in a world in which power is the crucial commodity. 
For the first time, in Caros breathtakingly vivid narrative, we see the Kennedy assassination through Lyndon Johnsons eyes. We watch Johnson step into the presidency, inheriting a staff fiercely loyal to his slain predecessor; a Congress determined to retain its power over the executive branch; and a nation in shock and mourning. We see how within weeksgrasping the reins of the presidency with supreme masteryhe propels through Congress essential legislation that at the time of Kennedys death seemed hopelessly logjammed and seizes on a dormant Kennedy program to create the revolutionary War on Poverty. Caro makes clear how the political genius with which Johnson had ruled the Senate now enabled him to make the presidency wholly his own. This was without doubt Johnsons finest hour, before his aspirations and accomplishments were overshadowed and eroded by the trap of Vietnam.
In its exploration of this pivotal period in Johnsons lifeand in the life of the nationThe Passage of Power is not only the story of how he surmounted unprecedented obstacles in order to fulfill the highest purpose of the presidency but is, as well, a revelation of both the pragmatic potential in the presidency and what can be accomplished when the chief executive has the vision and determination to move beyond the pragmatic and initiate programs designed to transform a nation. It is an epic story told with a depth of detail possible only through the peerless research that forms the foundation of Robert Caros work, confirming Nicholas von...

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