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The Etymologicon: A Circular Stroll Through…
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The Etymologicon: A Circular Stroll Through the Hidden Connections of the… (original 2011; udgave 2012)

af Mark Forsyth (Forfatter)

MedlemmerAnmeldelserPopularitetGennemsnitlig vurderingOmtaler
1,0464814,919 (3.91)42
Springing from writer and journalist Mark Forsyth's hugely popular blog The Inky Fool and including word-connection parlour games perfect for any word-lovers get-together, The Etymologicon is a brilliant map of the secret labyrinth that lurks beneath the English language.There's always a connection. Sometimes, it's obvious: an actor's role was once written on a roll of parchment, and cappuccinos are the same colour as the robes of a Capuchin monk. Sometimes the connection is astonishing and a little more hidden: who would have guessed that your pants and panties are named after Saint Pantaleon, the all-compassionate?… (mere)
Medlem:LorettaChat
Titel:The Etymologicon: A Circular Stroll Through the Hidden Connections of the English Language
Forfattere:Mark Forsyth (Forfatter)
Info:Berkley (2012), Edition: Reprint, 304 pages
Samlinger:Dit bibliotek
Vurdering:
Nøgleord:Ingen

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The Etymologicon: A Circular Stroll Through the Hidden Connections of the English Language af Mark Forsyth (2011)

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This is a completely enjoyable stroll through the origins of hundreds of words, told in a conversational style, with lots of personality and wit.

Seriously, what's not to love about this?

And, as an added bonus, every time I go to some insipid party where they have the inevitable pumpernickel and spinach dip, I can tell everyone that "pumpernickel" originally meant "the devil's fart," and it doesn't get any better than that. ( )
  TobinElliott | Sep 3, 2021 |
this is a very difficult book to describe...although the subtitle really says it all: A Circular Stroll Through the Hidden Connections of the English Language. The author starts with the word 'book', describes its etymology and developmental history, and meanders his way (in that typical british fashion) into how it etymologically relates to other seemingly unrelated words, and so on, and so forth...and before you know it, he's filled an entire book's worth of trivia you didnt know you didnt know.

mostly, i find it difficult to describe because i cannot remember any of it...well, two things stuck with me:

1. butterflies are so named because their poo is yellow, like butter (i dont know why of all the interesting facts in this book, this is the one i did not forget)

2. Buffalo is not just a name for the bovines, its also a name for a handful of north american towns. It also previously meant the verb 'to bully' or 'bullies'. Which means that this sentence makes sense somehow:

"Buffalo buffalo buffalo buffalo buffalo buffalo buffalo buffalo"

Very fun read :) ( )
  riida | Apr 3, 2021 |
This little book was on my (mental) "to purchase" list, but somehow I lost track of it. Until a few weeks ago, when I saw it in De Limerick, a bookstore in Ghent, Belgium. It must have been a sign, hahaha.

The Etymologicon offers a very nice, entertaining, and witty overview of some of the most used words in English. Mark Forsyth (see his website Inkyfool.com) makes the link with other languages (Greek, Italian, French, Latin, Polish, old English, ...), depending on the term he's presenting. This then also makes it easier (for me and other Dutch-speaking fellows) to make the link with, yes, Dutch.

You'll also find out how certain words have the same beginning/ending, therefore making them related and meaning (almost) the same thing. Of course, there are exceptions, but it is a sort of guide if you don't know the meaning of this or that word in the other language. Or, how several words were introduced 1 on 1, without changing them. Many were changed (leaving out a letter, changing the way it's written, ...), of course.

It is certainly NOT a dry read. It's also not a scholar book, so to speak. The Etymologicon was written for a larger audience, for anyone interested in language. Obviously, if you seek a more serious book, there are plenty of those. But for starters, this one will most certainly do. And you'll be picking it up from time to time. It's that good. :-)

In short: very much recommended. ( )
  TechThing | Jan 22, 2021 |
Light and funny, it's a bit like meaning of liff except with real words and it's about their etymologies... OK, it's nothing like the meaning of liff. I liked it and was amused by it but not in any thoughtful way. ( )
  Paul_S | Dec 23, 2020 |
This one jumped right into my top 10 fave books ever. It is the kind of thing I LOVE but that drives everyone around me crazy. Kind of Bill Brysonesque but way more random and pointless. He starts with the word book and then links it to turn and then chicken and through hundreds more origins and histories and then back to book and then ends way way too soon. I love this book ( )
  rickycatto | Sep 9, 2020 |
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Springing from writer and journalist Mark Forsyth's hugely popular blog The Inky Fool and including word-connection parlour games perfect for any word-lovers get-together, The Etymologicon is a brilliant map of the secret labyrinth that lurks beneath the English language.There's always a connection. Sometimes, it's obvious: an actor's role was once written on a roll of parchment, and cappuccinos are the same colour as the robes of a Capuchin monk. Sometimes the connection is astonishing and a little more hidden: who would have guessed that your pants and panties are named after Saint Pantaleon, the all-compassionate?

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