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Partials (Partials Sequence, 1) af Dan Wells
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Partials (Partials Sequence, 1) (udgave 2013)

af Dan Wells (Forfatter)

Serier: Partials Sequence (1)

MedlemmerAnmeldelserPopularitetGennemsnitlig vurderingOmtaler
1,25713111,498 (3.85)32
"In a post-apocalyptic eastern seaboard ravaged by disease and war with a manmade race of people called Partials, the chance at a future rests in the hands of Kira Walker, a sixteen-year-old medic in training"--
Medlem:SaraBurnett
Titel:Partials (Partials Sequence, 1)
Forfattere:Dan Wells (Forfatter)
Info:Balzer Bray (2013), Edition: Reprint, 528 pages
Samlinger:Dit bibliotek
Vurdering:
Nøgleord:Ingen

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Partials af Dan Wells

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Viser 1-5 af 131 (næste | vis alle)
The story of Partials takes place 11 years after humanity lost a terrible war. Basically, we created super soldiers (Partials) to fight for us. Of course, after they won the war they turned on us... Worse yet, right at the same time, there was a virus which killed 99.96% of humanity--including any new pregnancies.

So that's where we start. Humanity is stuck on Long Island while the Partials are out there™. Because no babies can survive the virus, the youngest living people are 14. The main characters are roughly 16. Even stranger, in an effort to figure out how to cure the virus, the Hope Act has been enacted. All women 18 or older must get pregnant as often as possible.

It's an odd premise, but each part at least follows through. It's a little strange that the main characters are so good at what they do (always a problem with YA fiction), but at least the idea that they had to grow up quickly helps offset that.

Other than that, it's an interesting world. The action keeps things moving, especially towards the latter end of the book, and I actually feel for the characters as things keep going sideways on them. There were a few twists that followed the standard YA post-apocalyptic tropes (is that a thing now) but a few that I missed, which is nice.

Overall, it's perhaps not as strong as some of the other books I've read this year (although it's the best post-apocalyptic YA :)), but it's more than good enough to finish the series.

Onward! ( )
  jpv0 | Jul 21, 2021 |
Well, it took a while to get through the audiobook when only listening for 20 minutes a day during my commutes. I liked it well enough. The pacing felt quite slow to me through out a lot of the book and while that worked okay in the car, I think if I had been reading a physical copy, I probably would have gotten rather bored. The climax and ending worked very well and was much better paced. The characters were all good in their own right and unique and individual, but I couldn't really find myself connecting with any of them. Maybe that's down to the face that I'm near two decades farther along in life than the characters, but even thinking back to my youth, I realize these were all people I probably wouldn't have gotten on well with. Dan Wells, though, excels as giving a good view of horrific ideas.

Quite a lot of deaths in it, which would definitely move it to older on the recommended ages I give it to. ( )
  youngheart80 | Jun 15, 2021 |
This book, for me, is 3.5 stars.
Partials are a very well-written dystopian story that doesn't insult the reader's intelligence, revolving around a post-apocalyptic future where newborns don't live more than a few days is left of science and medicine must find a cure for a mysterious virus known as RM. The books start well, with sharp mysteries and plot development, balanced with original dialog and characters. There's plenty of action and intrigue as Kira (the main character) negotiates a tricky path to find her cure, and several ominous forces are at work, including some of her allies. The 'science' of the virus and the Partials themselves are all well explained and believable. As mentioned, the scene-setting is top-notch; the author knows what the world looks like after the apocalypse.
I think something else sets Partials apart from other books in the genre and YA, in general, is that there's not much focus on romance, and there's no love triangle. Kira is already in a relationship with Marcus when the book starts. He's pushing for a stronger commitment, but Kira is focused on creating a better future, causing some tension between them. I was fully expecting something to happen between her and the Partial she captures, but nope. There is undeniably some connection between them, but what that will turn into isn't clear.
I really enjoyed Partials. It has a detailed world and well-rounded characters. It's action-packed and exciting, and I was never bored, even when there's a lull in the action. The only thing that really bothered me, other than the slow reveal of information, was that no one knows anything about the Partials even though humans created them. In all of those database searches Kira did, shouldn't she have come across at least some basic biological information about them? Unless this is one of those things that have yet to be revealed... ( )
  AvigailRGRIL | Nov 9, 2020 |
The only thing I wished this book had discussed is the impack on queer relationships. Because in a world where it is law that women who are 18 years of age or older must be pregnant within 2 months of their birthday, through whichever means necessary--normal sex or IVF, there's not a lot of room to be other than straight passing/straight. There are *horrifying* consequences for the idea of Consent, also. Government mandated sex isn't the best path for Consent to be a thing. Just don't even try to argue that one.
However, the consequences of that program/law, (Called the Hope Act, for mildly spoilery reasons) are clearly outlined, and the rest of the book was really well-written.
My only nitpicks were some handwaving time-jumps. I didn't really need to be told it was x amount of time later until the epilogue. And there are plenty of ways to show time passing.
5/5 AND I WANT TO READ THE REST OF THE SERIES because the PLOT TWISTS WERE MINDBOGGLING. ( )
  m_mozeleski | Aug 22, 2020 |
Partials has everything I want in a great dystopian novel and then some; amazing writing, awesome characters, great world building and a lot of surprises,

I really like the protagonist, Kira, although she's a bit pushy at times. But she's also smart, energetic and not afraid to speak her mind. She changes so much trough the book and I'm sure her change continues during the second book - seems that way to me. There are so many different characters in this book and I got to know all of them pretty well. I especially adored Marcus; he's so much fun.

"Well, thanks for not shooting anyone, I guess," said Marcus. "My contribution was to somehow refrain from peeing myself. You can thank me later." (s. 344)
The story has a great balance between action and touchy-feely-stuff. There's a lot of considering and planning, but it gets us through a lot of emotions, including love and betrayal. There's a lot of politics, but it works so well and doesn't get boring at all. It just all comes together.

Both the story and the world in the book is coherent - you can really sense how much work Dan Wells put in to it - no plot holes at all! I loved reading about a dystopian world so close to our own time - it makes it scarier in some way. The book may appear to be about saving humanity (which it is!), but it's also about believing in yourself and fighting for what you believe in. Kira chases the truth as much as she chases a cure and she fights hard for her case. She's very idealistic, yet not unrealistic. I just plain love her :) ( )
  Hyms | Aug 9, 2020 |
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"In a post-apocalyptic eastern seaboard ravaged by disease and war with a manmade race of people called Partials, the chance at a future rests in the hands of Kira Walker, a sixteen-year-old medic in training"--

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