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Tombstone af George P. Cosmatos
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Tombstone (original 1993; udgave 2008)

af George P. Cosmatos (Instruktør)

MedlemmerAnmeldelserPopularitetGennemsnitlig vurderingOmtaler
250280,635 (4.17)3
U.S. Marshall Wyatt Earp and Doc Holliday team up to bring law to the lawless in a showdown with ruthless outlaws at the O.K. Corral.
Medlem:jacobson1221
Titel:Tombstone
Forfattere:George P. Cosmatos (Instruktør)
Info:HOLLYWOOD PICTURES (1997), Edition: DVD Video
Samlinger:Dit bibliotek
Vurdering:
Nøgleord:Ingen

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Tombstone [1993 film] af George P. Cosmatos (Director) (1993)

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Tombstone

Kurt Russell – Wyatt Earp
Val Kilmer – Doc Holliday
Sam Elliott – Virgil Earp
Bill Paxton – Morgan Earp
Powers Boothe – Curly Bill Brocius
Michael Biehn – Johnny Ringo
Dana Delany – Josephine Marcus
Stephen Lang – Ike Clanton

Screenplay by Kevin Jarre
Directed by George P. Cosmatos

First released, 25 December 1993.

Cinergi Productions, 2009. 2DVD. 134 min. 5.1 Dolby Digital. Colour 2,35:1. Extras: “The Making Of” in three parts, audio commentary by the director, original map of the shootout at the OK Corral.

==============================

The life of Wyatt Earp is obviously a ripping subject for a movie. That this is not enough was sadly shown by the eponymous picture released in 1994. Had it been made at some other time, maybe it would have been, or at least seemed, better. But I doubt it. With a cast including Kevin Costner, Dennis Quaid and Gene Hackman you would think no movie can go wrong. Wrong! This one did. Partly to blame is Lawrence Kasdan’s insipid direction, but much the greater problem is the poor writing. The pace is painfully slow. The story and the characters are dramatically dull. No cast and no director can rectify such defects.

Now, the first thing that should be made clear about Tombstone is that this is a very well written screenplay. The story is complete, well-paced, multi-layered. Dramatic situations consistently range from memorable to unforgettable. When a scene is frankly improbable, the final shootout with Curly Bill for instance, this is gamely admitted in the dialogue. The dialogue? That is the chief glory of the script. Brusque, slangy and usually spoken with an endearing drawl, it is not only dramatically effective, tremendously so too, but it drives the action and builds the characters with a vengeance. Consider just a single among numerous examples:

Wyatt Earp:
I did my duty, now I'd like to get on with my life. I'm going to Tombstone.
Crawley Dake:
Ah, I see. To strike it rich. Well, all right, that's fine. Tell you one thing, though... I never saw a rich man who didn't wind up with a guilty conscience.
Wyatt Earp:
Already got a guilty conscience. Might as well have the money, too. Good day, now.

The second great thing about Tombstone is the cast. Maybe it could have been better, but I at least cannot think of any way to improve it. Kurt Russell, Sam Elliott and Bill Paxton are excellent as the three contrasting brothers, the breezy Wyatt, the upright Virgil and the green Morgan. Wyatt is the most prominent of them, of course, and Russell makes the best of his scenes. Unforgettable are his confrontation with a plump Billy Bob Thornton (“No need to go heeled to get the bulge on a tub like you”) and especially his crying in the rain with bloody hands after his brother’s death – this is almost out of modern remake of Macbeth. Dana Delany has never looked hotter on the screen and her romance with Wyatt is stylishly handled from its inauspicious beginning to its “room service” conclusion. Special bonuses include cameos by Billy Zane as an actor reciting Shakespeare (St Crispin’s Day speech from Henry V, heavily abridged) and the redoubtable Charlton Heston as a ranch owner.

But it’s Doc Holiday who steals the show. Val Kilmer has done some outstanding stuff on the screen, in Heat (1995), for example, and especially in The Salton Sea (2002), but he has never done anything to surpass his Doc Holiday. It’s a lovely character in the first place, masterfully written and far more complex than his dissolute lifestyle may suggest. The friendship between Doc and Wyatt is one of the backbones of the movie (it has several). Note Doc’s reaction when Wyatt tells him, right before the shootout at the OK Corral, that this isn’t his problem and he needn’t be mixed in it: “That is a hell of a thing for you to say to me.” The final scene in the sanatorium, with an unexpected revelation from Doc’s past that opens up a completely new dimension of his personality, is a masterpiece of concise characterisation. So is his last, sage advice: “There's no normal life, Wyatt. It's just life. Get on with it.” Indeed! Watch out for the small and poignant bits of dialogue that humanize Doc Holliday, for instance in the scene after the shootout by the river:

Turkey Creek Jack Johnson:
Doc, you oughta be in bed, what the hell you doin this for anyway?
Doc Holliday:
Wyatt Earp is my friend.
Turkey Creek Jack Johnson:
Hell, I got lots of friends.
Doc Holliday:
I don't.

It is no coincidence that Doc steals the best lines and the best scenes. Who can forget his chillingly cheeky “I’m your huckleberry” or his sinister conversation in Latin with Ringo in the saloon and the following scene that had everybody in stitches? It is left to Doc, too, to pinpoint the essence of Wyatt’s mission to exterminate the Cowboys: “Make no mistake, it's not revenge he's after. It's a reckonin'.” Doc is an educated man, a showman, a humorist, a maverick, a true friend and a lovable character. Not bad for a lunger, is it? Ah, and he plays the piano pretty well:

Billy Clanton [to Doc Holliday at the piano]:
Is that "Old Dog Trey? Sounds like "Old Dog Trey."
Doc Holliday:
Pardon?
Billy Clanton:
Stephen Foster. "Oh, Susannah", "Camptown Races". Stephen stinking Foster.
Doc Holliday:
Ah, yes. Well, this happens to be a nocturne.
Billy Clanton:
A which?
Doc Holliday:
You know, Frederic fucking Chopin.

One of the hallmarks of great movies is that the bad guys are handsome and cool, too. With Powers Boothe and Michael Biehn, you can be sure this is the case here. Curly Bill is a straightforward villain, a simple creature whose only purpose is to satisfy his primordial instincts. Johnny Ringo is a much more interesting character. Nothing is ever disclosed about his past, but there are several suggestive hints. He speaks Latin, quotes the Bible (Revelation 6:8, appropriately) and is evidently made of different metal than the rest of the Cowboys. The contrast between Ringo and Curly Bill is beautifully illustrated during the performance of Faust they attend in the local “theatre”. Bill comments, typically enough for him, that he would take the deal and “then drill that ol’ Devil in the ass”. When he asks Ringo what he would do, Johnny’s sombre reply is “I already did it”. Again it’s left to Doc, that natural philosopher of surprising depth and lucidity, to sum up Ringo best of all:

Wyatt Earp:
What makes a man like Ringo, Doc? What makes him do the things he does?
Doc Holliday:
A man like Ringo has got a great big hole, right in the middle of him. He can never kill enough, or steal enough, or inflict enough pain to ever fill it.
Wyatt Earp:
What does he need?
Doc Holliday:
Revenge.
Wyatt Earp:
For what?
Doc Holliday:
Bein' born.

Meticulous attention to detail, memorable music and accomplished direction round off Tombstone as one of the all-time great westerns and great movies. A must for western buffs and cinephiles alike!

The Director’s Cut is the one to have. It contains only about six additional minutes, but they include such valuable scenes as the ones between Wyatt and Mattie with the empty bottles of laudanum (not the “room service” scene from the theatrical version) and Doc separating from his leech of a partner in the barn. Now, these scenes do not add new layers to the characters, but they do make the existing ones clearer. We know Wyatt’s marriage is on the rocks and we know he is Doc’s best friend. Yet further insight into complex issues is always welcome. The changes, as usual, are expertly listed by IMDb.

To make things just perfect, the packaging is a gorgeous digipak in a slipcase with very authentic bullet holes in it. The map won’t tell you much you haven’t seen on the screen, but it was drawn by Wyatt Earp himself and it’s a fascinating historical curiosity. As the final lines in the film inform us, the Man with the Great Moustache died in 1929 in Los Angeles and among his pallbearers were early western stars like Tom Mix who wept. ( )
2 stem Waldstein | Oct 13, 2016 |
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  Bookman1954 | Oct 21, 2015 |
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» Tilføj andre forfattere (41 mulige)

Forfatter navnRolleHvilken slags forfatterVærk?Status
Cosmatos, George P.Directorprimær forfatteralle udgaverbekræftet
Jarre, KevinScreenwriterhovedforfatteralle udgaverbekræftet
Biehn, MichaelActormedforfatteralle udgaverbekræftet
Boothe, PowersActormedforfatteralle udgaverbekræftet
Broughton, BruceFilm scoremedforfatteralle udgaverbekræftet
Delany, DanaActormedforfatteralle udgaverbekræftet
Elliott, SamActormedforfatteralle udgaverbekræftet
Kilmer, ValActormedforfatteralle udgaverbekræftet
Lang, StephenActormedforfatteralle udgaverbekræftet
Paxton, BillActormedforfatteralle udgaverbekræftet
Russell, KurtActormedforfatteralle udgaverbekræftet
Wheeler-Nicholson, DanaActormedforfatteralle udgaverbekræftet

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U.S. Marshall Wyatt Earp and Doc Holliday team up to bring law to the lawless in a showdown with ruthless outlaws at the O.K. Corral.

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