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No Place Like Holmes af Jason Lethcoe
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No Place Like Holmes (udgave 2011)

af Jason Lethcoe (Forfatter)

MedlemmerAnmeldelserPopularitetGennemsnitlig vurderingOmtaler
628332,785 (3.86)2
"When Griffin is sent to stay with his detective uncle at 221A Baker Street for the summer, he is certain that his uncle must be the great Sherlock Holmes! But Griffin is disappointed to discover that Holmes lives at 221B Baker Street and his uncle lives unit 221A. His uncle is a detective, just not a very good one. But when Griffin meets a woman with a case that Holmes has turned away for being too ridiculous, he and his uncle team up to help her. Along the way, Griffin shows his uncle just what it means to have true faith in God, even when the case challenges that. The woman claims that her husband was eaten by the Loch Ness Monster, but monsters aren't real-or are they?"--Amazon.com, viewed May 10, 2011.… (mere)
Medlem:FBCregina1
Titel:No Place Like Holmes
Forfattere:Jason Lethcoe (Forfatter)
Info:Thomas Nelson (2011), Edition: Illustrated, 224 pages
Samlinger:Juvenile Fiction, Dit bibliotek
Vurdering:
Nøgleord:Ingen

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No Place Like Holmes af Jason Lethcoe

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» Se også 2 omtaler

Viser 1-5 af 8 (næste | vis alle)
Just a plain old good book. I think it speaks directly to its target kid audience--a neat little mystery, exploration of morality, ethics, and some emotional angst, mechanical gadgets, and overall fun. I believe it's from a Christian publisher and religion and faith do come up, but I didn't feel like I was hit over the head with it. The faith is simply part of the kid's life, rather than a separate element to be made much of. ( )
  Krumbs | Mar 31, 2013 |
I am a huge Sherlock Holmes fan. So to read a story from the perspective of what would be his rivalry was interesting, but a little awkward. No Place Like Holmes kind of makes you think of what Sherlock Holmes would be like as a kid – sort of. Griffin is also a Christian, and I am not sure if Holmes ever had a faith. Anyway, I really don’t want to compare and contrast Holmes and Griffin, it wouldn’t be fair. (Yes, I have to agree that I think Holmes is still the world’s greatest detective-sorry.) But I like Griffin a lot as well. I think he is such a great kid, and the gift he bears can be a heavy load at times but he carries it well. There are some minor issues I had with the story, only because they would be so farfetched. On the one hand I understand that it has to be for a kid to play a vital role in saving the world from evil in the first place.
If you forget about the bits that are not believable and just enjoy the story, it was a fun and light reading. It was nice to see very very little of Holmes’ presence in this book and I liked the commentary in Griffin’s head. Though I didn’t think I would I even started sort of liking Uncle Snodgrass. I think this is perfect reading for middle graders. ( )
  StarrK | Dec 19, 2011 |
Jason Lethcoe’s No Place Like Holmes begins with a clever premise: the story is set in the London of Sherlock Holmes and the events run parallel to the adventures of the great detective. The heroes of the story, young Griffin Sharpe and his uncle Rupert Snodgrass, live in the flat below Holmes at 221 Baker Street They test their wits against Nigel, the cousin of James Moriarty; and occasionally even cross paths with Sherlock himself. Unfortunately, the book is marred by lazy writing and obnoxious attempts at forcing Christianity upon the reader that might not sit well with even the 9- to 12-year-old intended audience.

Lethcoe seems to approach writing by scribbling down the first words that come to his mind, which seems to be filled with scraps from Saturday morning cartoons and bad detective movies. His characters are cartoonish and stereotypical, and in developing them he relies too much on telling and not enough on showing. The polite, mild-mannered Griffin Sharpe is intended to be a role model for young children, but his lack of flaws makes him a terribly uninteresting character. Uncle Rupert, on the other hand, is riddled with flaws, but the author uses the character’s logical mind to make several mean-spirited smears against science.

To its credit, the plot is easy to follow and sometimes amusing. The story’s central mystery unfolds slowly and gives children time to solve the case along with Griffin and his uncle. But the plotting suffers from the same laziness that affects the writing. Too often, the plot only progresses due to one of Rupert’s anachronistic inventions, the most egregious of which is a makeshift computer complete with internet access. And when the author really writes himself into a hole, he simply uses God to propel the story forward. These shoddy plot devices just have no place in a novel that attempts to mirror the style and atmosphere of a Sherlock Holmes story. In his attempt to pay homage to Holmes the author has only done them both a great disservice.
  edenjean | Nov 27, 2011 |
Reviewed by Kira M for TeensReadToo.com

When Griffin gets sent by his mother to live with his uncle at 221 Baker Street, he gets excited at the thought that his uncle may be the great Sherlock Holmes. When he gets there, however, he discovers that his uncle lives in 221B and is named Rupert Snodgrass, the neighbor of Sherlock Holmes, resident of 221A.

His uncle, though, is also a detective like Holmes, but he uses instruments and science instead of intuition to solve mysteries. When the wife of Frederick Dent runs into Griffin and starts begging to see Sherlock Holmes, Griffin takes her home. They soon discover that Sherlock isn't there, and Rupert takes on the case himself.

Mr. Dent, the clockmaker, was supposed to meet someone at the pier in order to fix one of the greatest clocks ever created. Witnesses who saw him disappear claim he was swallowed up by a great creature that looked like the Loch Ness Monster.

What really happened to Frederick Dent? Can Rupert and Griffin solve the case?

A quick, fun read for anyone who likes mysteries. The characters are lovable and well-developed, even the cranky uncle and the villains. The plot is well-crafted and the mystery is intriguing and does a good job of holding the reader's interest. Those who like mysteries, adventure, mythology, and science will all enjoy reading NO PLACE LIKE HOLMES. ( )
  GeniusJen | Jun 13, 2011 |
My Thoughts:
This is a great mystery for YA readers! This is a wonderful story for the "new to mystery" readers to 'cut their teeth' on. It is well written, planned out from beginning to end, entertaining, and much more emotional than I had expected.
The characters are fantastic! I fell in love with Griffin - what a sweet, sad little boy. I found myself close to tears many times. I was thrilled to see that his demeanor influences that of his Uncle Snodgrass in a positive way.
The villains are sooooo evil, Nigel - - - what a HORRID man - a larger version of the contemptible young man he had been as a child.
All the characters stand out in some way.
The plot is not so complicated that the adult reader doesn't see the next move coming, but all the while it is complex enough to keep you turning the pages and wondering about the end.
I have to admit that I wasn't ready for the end!
I love that there is an element of steampunk thrown in! The inventions are wonderful. I would love to have read this aloud to middle schoolers, just so I could have seen their faces when Griffin gets to use Snodgrass's information finding machine. Watts is amazing!

Overall a very worthwhile read! Intriguing and entertaining from start to finish.
I plan to impatiently await the next book in the series! ( )
  DragonLibrary8 | May 29, 2011 |
Viser 1-5 af 8 (næste | vis alle)
Now who would not like to be Holmes’s nephew.Griffin Sharpe, a twelve year old boy from America, comes to London to understand and live English culture.When he realizes, that his uncle in London is very famous detective, he has more reason to be happy.But he realizes that Rupert Snodgrass is his uncle and he is a detective as well and lives in 221A.
Griffin Sharpe is intelligent and keen observer and you will notice that the moment he lands in London.I love Griffin Sharpe as the youngest and most secretive detective of 1932.
Rupert Snodgrass has not done much as detective.And his character as detective obsessed by Holmes’s fame was a bit presumable for me.But i liked the way Lethcoe has written Snodgrass.He is a man of science and instruments and solves case using instruments he makes.
At the end, Holmes is retiring and leaves London in hands of Sharpe and Snodgrass.
I quite liked the book.And am waiting to read more of Sharpe cases and I am waiting for him to grow into Holmes
When i read the word Holmes, I was kinda expecting Holmes involved.As i have grown reading Sherlock Holmes.But at the end I was happy with the new detectives.
And of course I didn’t expect a ’12 year old kid solving Hound of Baskervilles.But if Lethcoe continues to grow with Sharpe,I would love to see Sharpe grow to solve Hound of Baskervilles.
No Place Like Holmes is easy and fun read.
tilføjet af alpa_dedhia | RedigerPublisher, Alpa Dedhia
 

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"When Griffin is sent to stay with his detective uncle at 221A Baker Street for the summer, he is certain that his uncle must be the great Sherlock Holmes! But Griffin is disappointed to discover that Holmes lives at 221B Baker Street and his uncle lives unit 221A. His uncle is a detective, just not a very good one. But when Griffin meets a woman with a case that Holmes has turned away for being too ridiculous, he and his uncle team up to help her. Along the way, Griffin shows his uncle just what it means to have true faith in God, even when the case challenges that. The woman claims that her husband was eaten by the Loch Ness Monster, but monsters aren't real-or are they?"--Amazon.com, viewed May 10, 2011.

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