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The Forest Laird: A Tale of William Wallace…
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The Forest Laird: A Tale of William Wallace (original 2010; udgave 2012)

af Jack Whyte (Forfatter)

Serier: The Guardians of Scotland (Book 1)

MedlemmerAnmeldelserPopularitetGennemsnitlig vurderingOmtaler
1807114,032 (3.63)8
Wallace's cousin Jamie remembers the Scottish rebel as an angry young orphan who grew up shaped by Ewen Scrymgeour, a once-outlawed archer, and Bishop Wishart of Glasgow, a kind but ruthless patriot who nurtured Wallace's hatred of the English. Set in 13th century Scotland.
Medlem:kemiddleton
Titel:The Forest Laird: A Tale of William Wallace
Forfattere:Jack Whyte (Forfatter)
Info:Forge Books (2012), Edition: Reprint, 512 pages
Samlinger:Dit bibliotek, Skal læses
Vurdering:
Nøgleord:Ingen

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The Forest Laird af Jack Whyte (2010)

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Interesting book! Like many of Jack Whyte's other novels, this was a combination of action-adventure and history. As stated in the "Author's Note," there is not much historical information about William Wallace so much of Wallace's life had to be imagined. Whyte, however, does stick pretty closely to the Scottish history of this time. The one drawback I did find to this rather long novel was the amount of pages devoted to characters discussing the changes in the Scottish economy and culture. There is a fairly large section through the middle of the book where not much happens. Overall, though, the story was interesting. ( )
  ChuckRinn | Oct 4, 2020 |
Today William Wallace is considered a hero of Scotland, not the outlaw that he was held to be by the English in the 13th century. His opposition to Edward I and the English having a stranglehold on Scotland led him into open rebellion. He led the Scottish forces at a number of battles but was eventually betrayed and turned over to the English. Charged with treason, he was tortured, hung but taken down while still alive to be drawn and quartered. The Forest Laird by Jack Whyte is a work of historical fiction, based on the facts of his life.

Circumstances of fate brought William Wallace to take the direction that eventually brought him to his grisly ending. He grew up during the rule of Alexander III of Scotland but when that king died unexpectedly leaving the country without a proper heir, the English saw an opportunity to step in and claim Scotland for themselves. In The Forest Laird the author breathes life into the myth. Told through the voice of his cousin, Father James, who grew up with Wallace, we read of the reluctant outlaw, fugitive and hero who at heart was a man who was most at home in the forest, and would rather have lived quietly there with his family.

This was a good story that developed the character of William Wallace beyond the Hollywood treatment of the film “Braveheart”. The book opens on the eve of Wallace’s death and so there is no nasty surprise awaiting the reader, his execution is known from the start. Although the book occasionally got bogged down with political events and explanations, I enjoyed this story about a simple man who got caught up in complex events. ( )
  DeltaQueen50 | Nov 23, 2017 |
I loved this book, as I love all Jack Whyte's books. It is about William Wallace the fabled hero of Scotland that the Braveheart film was based on. It is a purely fictional account of his rise and fall and is written with all the warmth and feeling that Jack Whytes weaves into all his books.
Written in the first person by Wallace's supposed cousin Father James Wallace it tells the story of the 2 boys at age 8 or 9 being badly used by English soldiers to the ignominious death of William, taken by the English soldiery trying to revenge the death of his beloved wife Mirren and baby son Willie. A wonderful telling of a story relegated to legend and history. A must read for anyone intersted in this period of history, or even if you just enjoy a real good yarn. ( )
  Glorybe1 | Feb 9, 2013 |
There is not much action in this book, and in an 800 page paperback with a cover blurb promising the reader that it "crackles along", this is a problem. For readers seeking a BraveHeart-like historical adventure, or at least a typical Jack Whyte tale, The Forest Laird will disappoint. For those seeking to learn more about William Wallace and to situate him in the political, economic, and religious currents of his time, and who can abide doing so at some length, this book might be more for them. As for the portrayals of Will Wallace and his narrating cousin in this book, they are dull and duller, like characters in a historical reenactment.

In fairness to Jack Whyte, I come to his rendering of the historical Wallace from Hilary Mantel's singular reimagining of Thomas Cromwell in Bring up the Bodies (and Wolf Hall). Her Cromwell connects with the reader in such a complex and human way that we are immersed indelibly in that time and place. Few historical fictions could compare favourably. ( )
  maritimer | Aug 1, 2012 |
This book is a bit misleading in its description. It does refer to William Wallace (Mel Gibson played him in Braveheart) but to say he is the main character or plot is not true in my opinion. The book is really a first person narrative of Scotland in the mid thirteenth century. The book has really 4 stories interwoven...You have the life of James Wallace (Will's cousin), his hopes, fears as a child then as a priest (he is the narrator of the story and the main plot), William Wallace himself as he progresses from young boy to outlaw, the Scottish church and the politics of England's King Edward desire to control Scotland.

There are moments in this long book which are very interesting as you follow the young life of these two boys and their best friend and savior Ewan. I really liked the first half of the book. But then it slows down with page after page of description of Scottish internal trouble, the church view of these problem. You only get glimpses of William Wallace after that until James Wallace (now Father James) goes to live in Selkirk forest with the outlaws lead by William Wallace...nice for a while but then it gets bogged down in politics and the church again.

There are few "battle scenes" as such...the occasional skirmish which is done quite well and you certainly understand how an English long bow archer develops. However, you keep wondering when you will focus on driving the English out of Scotland and Will Wallace's capture which leads to his death as described at the beginning of the book....I smell a sequel book as the story ended abruptly with the death of his wife and children.

Good story especially the first half....but dragged toward the end and an unsatisfied ending for my taste. ( )
  Lynxear | Nov 28, 2011 |
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Wallace's cousin Jamie remembers the Scottish rebel as an angry young orphan who grew up shaped by Ewen Scrymgeour, a once-outlawed archer, and Bishop Wishart of Glasgow, a kind but ruthless patriot who nurtured Wallace's hatred of the English. Set in 13th century Scotland.

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