HjemGrupperSnakMereZeitgeist
Søg På Websted
På dette site bruger vi cookies til at levere vores ydelser, forbedre performance, til analyseformål, og (hvis brugeren ikke er logget ind) til reklamer. Ved at bruge LibraryThing anerkender du at have læst og forstået vores vilkår og betingelser inklusive vores politik for håndtering af brugeroplysninger. Din brug af dette site og dets ydelser er underlagt disse vilkår og betingelser.

Resultater fra Google Bøger

Klik på en miniature for at gå til Google Books

Indlæser...

Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking

af Susan Cain

Andre forfattere: Se andre forfattere sektionen.

MedlemmerAnmeldelserPopularitetGennemsnitlig vurderingOmtaler
11,110486583 (4.02)408
This book demonstrates how introverted people are misunderstood and undervalued in modern culture, charting the rise of extrovert ideology while sharing anecdotal examples of how to use introvert talents to adapt to various situations. At least one-third of the people we know are introverts. They are the ones who prefer listening to speaking, reading to partying; who innovate and create but dislike self-promotion; who favor working on their own over brainstorming in teams. Although they are often labeled "quiet," it is to introverts that we owe many of the great contributions to society, from van Gogh's sunflowers to the invention of the personal computer. Filled with indelible stories of real people, this book shows how dramatically we undervalue introverts, and how much we lose in doing so. Taking the reader on a journey from Dale Carnegie's birthplace to Harvard Business School, from a Tony Robbins seminar to an evangelical megachurch, the author charts the rise of the Extrovert Ideal in the twentieth century and explores its far-reaching effects. She talks to Asian-American students who feel alienated from the brash, backslapping atmosphere of American schools. She questions the dominant values of American business culture, where forced collaboration can stand in the way of innovation, and where the leadership potential of introverts is often overlooked. And she draws on cutting-edge research in psychology and neuroscience to reveal the differences between extroverts and introverts. She introduces us to successful introverts, from a witty, high-octane public speaker who recharges in solitude after his talks, to a record-breaking salesman who quietly taps into the power of questions. Finally, she offers advice on everything from how to better negotiate differences in introvert-extrovert relationships to how to empower an introverted child to when it makes sense to be a "pretend extrovert." This book has the ability to permanently change how we see introverts and, equally important, how introverts see themselves.… (mere)
Indlæser...

Bliv medlem af LibraryThing for at finde ud af, om du vil kunne lide denne bog.

Der er ingen diskussionstråde på Snak om denne bog.

» Se også 408 omtaler

This book provides fresh insight on the qualities of the introverted personality. I saw many of my experiences reflected in the stories told here. Especially meaningful to me is the recognition that one need not struggle against one’s own personality limits; it is more fulfilling to seek new capacities while respecting one’s fundamental traits. Probably Cain’s greatest contribution is her critique of extroversion as a universal ideal fri success in life — a view particularly oppressive to the quiet people among us. ( )
  itheodore | Nov 22, 2023 |
This book was very insightful, and I really enjoyed reading it. What I appreciated the most were the scientific, physiological reasons for introverted behavior. It also explored traits that are often linked to introversion, but not exclusively, such as high/low "reactivity" or "sensitivity" to external stimulation. The book was helpful for my understanding of extroverts, as well.

I disagreed with Cain's comments on evolution. She refers to our shared familial history with monkeys, but provides no true evidence to support it.

My last complaint is that of her reference to "the Western God" (pg 189), referring to the Christian God. Firstly, the Christian God does not somehow belong only to the Western world. Secondly, her assumptions about Him apparently are conceived from "Jesus Christ Superstar," which is what she references instead of the Holy Bible. This seemed like a rather ridiculous failing considering the obvious attention to detail that she paid to her research for other aspects of the book. As a Christian myself, I found it frustrating that she would portray my Lord rather carelessly that way, since religion is an incredibly important cultural issue. She took such care in approaching the cultural issue of the "Extrovert Ideal" with balance and thought, and I find it unfortunate that she overlooked the importance of doing the same with religion.

All in all, however, the book was a very intriguing read, and I would recommend it to introverts and extroverts alike for greater understanding of how our brains truly work.

Update 1/18/21: During my second read-through, I noticed that many of the traits Cain (and other researchers) attributed to introversion or extroversion often seemed more related to the traits of "turbulence" and "assertiveness" as defined by the www.16personalities.com interpretation of the MBTI.

There is some brief profanity.
( )
  RachelRachelRachel | Nov 21, 2023 |
Such an interesting book. Good to read for introverts; but will extroverts?

Nice to finally understand that the trait is at least partly genetic. Just wonder if intro is normal and extro an aberration? Probably both are needed, or we’d all be bred out of existence. ( )
  hotblack43 | Nov 21, 2023 |
I tend to be wary of pop psychology books, but Quiet came well recommended by multiple sources. I had the opportunity to do a couple of leadership training workshops over the last couple of years and it kept coming up. I'm glad I read it. I think I feel this way about a lot of pop psychology books; I have an initially suspicious attitude, but I end up thinking about the book a lot after I finish reading it. I think I will feel the same way about this one.

I know that most people understand the basic idea of introverts and extroverts. I tend to be very cautious about categorizing people into one category or the other, and I strongly suspect things like the Myers-Briggs test are more pseudoscience than actual science. However, I like that we have a book that shows a lot of examples of how introverts are undervalued and as somebody that would definitely be classified as an introvert, it's reassuring.

Some of the bits about children kind of make me wonder. For instance, the author gives lots of advice about how parents shouldn't be worried about their introverted children and should look for ways of supporting them. Maybe it's just my background, but I got the idea that parents were probably more thrilled to have introverted children, because those kids tend to be quieter and easier to manage. So I wonder if the author is overstating the patholigization of introverted children in our society.

But overall, I think this book is helpful for people - namely introverts - to draw power from (I'm very curious to see what extroverts think about this book). Maybe people that would describe themselves as introverts will enjoy knowing that they can be very successful and have as powerful of an impact on the world around them as the extroverts do. And also that it is okay to be introverted and learn from the key advice, which is to take time to recharge and look for ways to play to your strengths (especially when on a team of extroverts).

Another thing that I'll be thinking about long after this book is off my shelf is the idea that introverts are more likely to take the time to process things and give meaningful feedback rather than just saying something just to say something. That's something I respect and try to practice. I do think that teaching introverts and people that would consider themselves shy how to express themselves more is valuable. I've thought more and more about looking for opportunities for quiet people to practice being more comfortable speaking and advocating for themselves, especially during an anxiety epidemic. It's incredibly valuable personality and absolutely necessary professionally. It's reassuring to see that other folks agree. ( )
1 stem janichkokov | Oct 31, 2023 |
Interesting book. Lots for the reader to think about. I'm an iintrovert and as a child did feel pressure to be more outgoing.. These days the kids still feel pressure, especially with so much social media etc. but information like the author discusses maybe will help people have a more balanced attitude toward all kinds of personalities. ( )
  loraineo | Sep 29, 2023 |
Viser 1-5 af 493 (næste | vis alle)

» Tilføj andre forfattere (7 mulige)

Forfatter navnRolleHvilken slags forfatterVærk?Status
Susan Cainprimær forfatteralle udgaverberegnet
Duffy, LauraOmslagsdesignermedforfatternogle udgaverbekræftet
Fedor, AaronOmslagsfotograf/tegner/...medforfatternogle udgaverbekræftet
Mazur, KatheFortællermedforfatternogle udgaverbekræftet
Prosperi, CarloOversættermedforfatternogle udgaverbekræftet
Reitsma, Jan WillemOversættermedforfatternogle udgaverbekræftet
Wallin, BitteOversættermedforfatternogle udgaverbekræftet
Du bliver nødt til at logge ind for at redigere data i Almen Viden.
For mere hjælp se Almen Viden hjælpesiden.
Kanonisk titel
Oplysninger fra den engelske Almen Viden Redigér teksten, så den bliver dansk.
Originaltitel
Alternative titler
Oprindelig udgivelsesdato
Personer/Figurer
Vigtige steder
Oplysninger fra den engelske Almen Viden Redigér teksten, så den bliver dansk.
Vigtige begivenheder
Beslægtede film
Indskrift
Oplysninger fra den engelske Almen Viden Redigér teksten, så den bliver dansk.
A species in which everyone was General Patton would not succeed, any more than would a race in which everyone was Vincent van Gogh. I prefer to think that the planet needs athletes, philosophers, sex symbols, painters, scientists; it needs the warmhearted, the hardhearted, the coldhearted, and the weakhearted. It needs those who can devote their lives to studying how many droplets of water are secreted by the salivary glands of dogs under which circumstances, and it needs those who can capture the passing impression of cherry blossoms in a fourteen-syllable poem or devote twenty-five pages to the dissection of a small boy's feelings as he lies in bed in the dark waiting for his mother to kiss him good night. . . . Indeed the presence of outstanding strengths presupposes that energy needed in other areas has been channeled away from them.

- Allen Shawn
Tilegnelse
Oplysninger fra den engelske Almen Viden Redigér teksten, så den bliver dansk.
To my childhood family
Første ord
Oplysninger fra den engelske Almen Viden Redigér teksten, så den bliver dansk.
[Introduction]
Montgomery, Alabama. December 1, 1955.
[Author's Note] I have been working on this book officially since 2005, and unofficially for my entire adult life.
The date: 1902. The place: Harmony Church, Missouri, a tiny, dot-on-the-map town located on a floodplain a hundred miles from Kansas City.
[Conclusion] Whether you're an introvert yourself or an extrovert who loves or works with one, I hope you'll benefit personally from the insights in this book.
[A Note on the Dedication] My grandfather was a soft-spoken man with sympathetic blue eyes, and a passion for books and ideas.
Citater
Oplysninger fra den engelske Almen Viden Redigér teksten, så den bliver dansk.
To ask whether it's nature or nurture ... is like asking whether a blizzard is caused by temperature or humidity.
"It's so easy to confuse schmoozing ability with talent. Someone seems like a good presenter, easy to get along with and those traits are rewarded. Well, why is that? They're valuable traits but we put too much of a premium on presenting and not enough on substance and critical thinking." (one venture capitalist)
We need leaders who build not their own egos but the institutions they run.
So if, deep down, you've been thinking that it's only natural for the bold and sociable to dominate the reserved and sensitive, and that the Extrovert Ideal is innate to humanity, Robert McCrae's personality map suggests a different truth: that each way of being—quiet and talkative, careful and audacious, inhibited and unrestrained—is characteristic of its own mighty civilization.
If there is one insight you take away from this book, though, I hope it's a newfound sense of entitlement to be yourself.
Sidste ord
Oplysninger fra den engelske Almen Viden Redigér teksten, så den bliver dansk.
(Klik for at vise Advarsel: Kan indeholde afsløringer.)
Oplysning om flertydighed
Forlagets redaktører
Oplysninger fra den engelske Almen Viden Redigér teksten, så den bliver dansk.
Bagsidecitater
Oplysninger fra den engelske Almen Viden Redigér teksten, så den bliver dansk.
Originalsprog
Oplysninger fra den engelske Almen Viden Redigér teksten, så den bliver dansk.
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC

Henvisninger til dette værk andre steder.

Wikipedia på engelsk (3)

This book demonstrates how introverted people are misunderstood and undervalued in modern culture, charting the rise of extrovert ideology while sharing anecdotal examples of how to use introvert talents to adapt to various situations. At least one-third of the people we know are introverts. They are the ones who prefer listening to speaking, reading to partying; who innovate and create but dislike self-promotion; who favor working on their own over brainstorming in teams. Although they are often labeled "quiet," it is to introverts that we owe many of the great contributions to society, from van Gogh's sunflowers to the invention of the personal computer. Filled with indelible stories of real people, this book shows how dramatically we undervalue introverts, and how much we lose in doing so. Taking the reader on a journey from Dale Carnegie's birthplace to Harvard Business School, from a Tony Robbins seminar to an evangelical megachurch, the author charts the rise of the Extrovert Ideal in the twentieth century and explores its far-reaching effects. She talks to Asian-American students who feel alienated from the brash, backslapping atmosphere of American schools. She questions the dominant values of American business culture, where forced collaboration can stand in the way of innovation, and where the leadership potential of introverts is often overlooked. And she draws on cutting-edge research in psychology and neuroscience to reveal the differences between extroverts and introverts. She introduces us to successful introverts, from a witty, high-octane public speaker who recharges in solitude after his talks, to a record-breaking salesman who quietly taps into the power of questions. Finally, she offers advice on everything from how to better negotiate differences in introvert-extrovert relationships to how to empower an introverted child to when it makes sense to be a "pretend extrovert." This book has the ability to permanently change how we see introverts and, equally important, how introverts see themselves.

No library descriptions found.

Beskrivelse af bogen
Haiku-resume

LibraryThing Early Reviewers Alum

Susan Cain's book Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking was available from LibraryThing Early Reviewers.

Current Discussions

Ingen

Populære omslag

Quick Links

Vurdering

Gennemsnit: (4.02)
0.5
1 24
1.5 3
2 91
2.5 24
3 437
3.5 122
4 1026
4.5 124
5 776

Er det dig?

Bliv LibraryThing-forfatter.

Penguin Australia

2 udgaver af dette værk er udgivet af Penguin Australia.

Udgaver: 0670916765, 0141029196

 

Om | Kontakt | LibraryThing.com | Brugerbetingelser/Håndtering af brugeroplysninger | Hjælp/FAQs | Blog | Butik | APIs | TinyCat | Efterladte biblioteker | Tidlige Anmeldere | Almen Viden | 197,638,957 bøger! | Topbjælke: Altid synlig