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Jeeves in the Offing

af P. G. Wodehouse

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Serier: Jeeves (11)

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Someone has stolen - yet again - Uncle Tom's antique silver cow-creamer. Suspicions fall on Wilbert Cream, believed to be a wealthy American practical joker and kleptomaniac known as Broadway Willie. But the incident only marks the beginning of Bertie Wooster's problems. It is only by a stroke of rare - very rare - genius that Bertie Wooster finds a solution. He recalls Jeeves, his incomparable manservant, from his annual holiday at Herne Bay, and Jeeves sorts out everybody and everything in his usual inimitable style.… (mere)

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Viser 1-5 af 35 (næste | vis alle)
Good fun. Not my favourite Jeeves book; there's something about some of these later ones that makes the narrative feel a trifle watered-down. Truth be told, I find some of the characterisations in the books a bit vague, as if Wodehouse wanted to update the social mores to the time he was writing (indeed, there are a few sly anachronistic cultural references by the narration) but couldn't, whether because he was in thrall to the formula, or perhaps because he was already 80(!).

Still, very well put together. Probably reads better if you've read some earlier books, as a lot of the inter-relationships and references to other novels threaten to overwhelm the story and thus the humour. ( )
  therebelprince | Nov 15, 2020 |
This review is written with a GPL 4.0 license and the rights contained therein shall supersede all TOS by any and all websites in regards to copying and sharing without proper authorization and permissions. Crossposted at WordPress, Blogspot & Librarything by Bookstooge’s Exalted Permission

Title: Jeeves in the Offing
Series: Jeeves Omnibus #4.2
Author: P.G. Wodehouse
Rating: 3.5 of 5 Stars
Genre: Humor
Pages: 200
Words: 41.7K

Synopsis:
.

From Wikipedia

An old friend Bertie went to preparatory school with, Reginald "Kipper" Herring, is staying with Bertie for a week. Bertie eagerly accepts an invitation from his aunt, Aunt Dahlia, to her home, Brinkley Court, since Jeeves is about to go to Herne Bay on holiday. Aunt Dahlia's husband, Bertie's Uncle Tom, is trying to make a business deal with an American named Homer Cream. While the two of them are in Harrogate, Mr. Cream's wife Adela Cream, an author of mystery stories, and their son Wilbert Cream are staying at Brinkley Court. The mischievous Roberta "Bobbie" Wickham, and Aubrey Upjohn, who was once Bertie and Kipper's oppressive headmaster, will also be there, along with Phyllis Mills. She is Upjohn's stepdaughter and Aunt Dahlia's goddaughter. Upjohn hopes to stand for a local election after giving a speech at the Market Snodsbury grammar school, and Phyllis is typing his speech.

Before going to Brinkley Court, Bertie learns that Kipper, who works for a weekly paper and is vengeful towards Upjohn, wrote a scathing, anonymous review of Upjohn's recently published book. Jeeves tells Bertie that Willie Cream is a notorious troublemaking playboy known as "Broadway Willie". After Jeeves leaves, Bertie sees a jarring announcement in The Times stating that he is engaged to Bobbie.

At Brinkley Court, Bertie finds Wilbert Cream reading poetry to Phyllis. He then finds Bobbie, who assures him that the engagement announcement was merely to scare her mother, who dislikes Bertie, into approving the man Bobbie really wants to marry, Reginald Herring.

While her regular butler Seppings is away on holiday, the psychiatrist Sir Roderick Glossop is working undercover for Aunt Dahlia as a butler named Swordfish. Upjohn is urging his daughter Phyllis to marry Wilbert. Aunt Dahlia does not approve of Willie's reputation, so at her behest, Glossop is there to observe Wilbert's behaviour. Bertie tries to keep Wilbert away from Phyllis. By letter, Jeeves informs Bertie that Willie Cream is a kleptomaniac. Uncle Tom's silver cow-creamer goes missing.

While Bobbie is away, Kipper comes to Brinkley Court. He was engaged to Bobbie, but thinks it is over after seeing the marriage announcement for Bertie and Bobbie. He is relieved when Bertie tells him the announcement was fake. Glossop searches Wilbert Cream's room for the cow-creamer, and bonds with Bertie. Bobbie ends her engagement to Kipper after reading an angry letter he wrote when he first saw the marriage announcement, and proclaims she will marry Bertie. Bertie does not want to marry her, but is prevented by his personal code from turning down any woman, so he drives to Herne Bay to get help from Jeeves. Jeeves agrees to return to Brinkley with Bertie. Bobbie soon forgives Kipper's letter, but Kipper, to spite Bobbie, becomes engaged to Phyllis.

Aunt Dahlia tells Bertie that Wilbert Cream did not steal the cow-creamer. Uncle Tom sold it to him. Meanwhile, Upjohn intends to sue Kipper's paper for libel. While his review was mostly legitimate, a small libellous portion was secretly added by Bobbie. Apologetic, Bobbie reconciles with Kipper. Glossop suggests that Kipper save his job by rescuing Upjohn from drowning. After Bertie and Bobbie fail to push Upjohn in the nearby lake, Bertie and Phyllis's dog Poppet fall in instead. Kipper dives in to help Bertie, mistaking him for Upjohn, and Wilbert dives in to help Phyllis's dog Poppet. Moved, Phyllis gets engaged to Wilbert. This initially upsets Aunt Dahlia, though it turns out that Wilbert is not actually the infamous Broadway Willie: that is his younger brother, Wilfred.

Upjohn becomes aware that Kipper wrote the scathing review and refuses to stay in the same house. Jeeves packs for Upjohn, neglecting to pack Upjohn's typed speech. After receiving the typescript from Jeeves, Bobbie makes Upjohn withdraw his libel suit before she returns it to him.

Thinking Wilbert stole it, Glossop confiscated the cow-creamer. Adela Cream finds the cow-creamer in Glossop's room and thinks he stole it. To prevent a misunderstanding, Glossop has revealed his true occupation. Following Jeeves's advice, Glossop has claimed he had been brought to observe Bertie and had recovered the cow-creamer from Bertie's room. Bertie is upset that the Cream family thinks he is a kleptomaniac, but Jeeves placates Bertie by saying that he has the satisfaction of helping his uncle. Bertie, remembering receiving gifts from Uncle Tom while at prep school, replies, "How right you are, Jeeves!"

My Thoughts:

By this time I have begun to realize that most stories about Jeeves and Wooster follow a loose pattern. Bertie gets ensnared into some imbroglio or other. He makes the situation worse by trying to solve it himself. He asks Jeeves for help. Jeeves apparently makes things worse but in the end reveals that that was just a part of his machinations and everything turns out according to plan.

Sure enough, this had most of those elements. Jeeves plays a VERY small part in this novel while Bertie tries to solve things on his own multiple times (usually he learns after one disastrous attempt) and of course, his attempts are huge failures.

In most of these stories by Wodehouse I tend to find at least one character very annoying. Sometimes it is Bertie Wooster, sometimes it is one of his friends, sometimes it is one of the love interests of his friends and sometimes it is the “villain” of the story. This time around it was the love interest Roberta “Bobby” Wickham. I wanted to take her over my knee and just paddle her for the absolute nonsense she spouted and completely idiotic actions she took. I considered knocking this down to a 3star just because of her, she really annoyed me that much.

Other than her, I enjoyed this quite a bit. I'd read this back in '07 but honestly, I don't remember reading it or any of the details so it was like I read it for the first time all over again. Apparently I also enjoyed it a lot more this time around, as last time I only gave it 2 stars. I'm guessing I had even less empathy for Bobby Wickham back then :-D

★★★☆½ ( )
  BookstoogeLT | Apr 22, 2020 |
“Where Art Thou, Jeeves?” would’ve been a more appropriate title. The brainbox has little more than a cameo in this novel.

Not only it there a lack of Jeeves, but there’s a lack of laughs. Yes, it’s funny in places, but not to the extent I expected, especially when I learned the wonderful Bobbie Wickham was involved.

Bobbie’s previous appearances in Wodehouse books are fantastically funny. In this novel, however, she’s somewhat subdued. “Subdued” is the right word for the story.

Overall, then, I was disappointed, but if you like the author and/or the other Jeeves books, it’s still worth reading. ( )
  PhilSyphe | Feb 28, 2020 |
Bertie is once again haplessly involved in trying to stop a liable suit, an engagement and the displeasure of his aunt. ( )
  addunn3 | Dec 10, 2018 |
The title is the original, English title. In the USA, it was published as How Right You Are, Jeeves; see my review under that title. ( )
  raizel | Jul 24, 2018 |
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Jeeves placed the sizzling eggs and b. on the breakfast table, and Reginald ('Kipper') Herring and I, licking the lips, squared our elbows and got down to it.
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“Neat that.   Your own?”
“No, sir.  Shakespeare's.”
“Shakespeare said some rather good things.”
“I understand that he has given uniform satisfaction, sir”   (Bertie Wooster and Jeeves, Chap. 5)
It just shows the truth of the old saying that half the world doesn't know how the other three-quarters lives.     (Bertie Wooster, Chap. 10)
No one who has got his or her hooks on a Rex Stout lightly lets it go. (Bertie Wooster, Chap. 14)
“[…] I am sorry to butt in when you are absorbed in your Spinoza and have probably just got to the part where the second corpse is discovered […]”  (Bertie Wooster, Chap. 14)
I hadn't read any of those etiquette books you see all over the place, but I am prepared to bet that the leaders of Society who wrote them would raise an eyebrow or two at carryings-on of this description.  The chapter on Hints to Hostesses would be bound to have a couple of paragraphs warning them that it isn't the done thing to invite people to the home and having got them settled in to pinch their porringers.  (Bertie Wooster, Chap. 15)
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UK title 'Jeeves in the Offing', US title 'How Right You Are, Jeeves'
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Ingen

Someone has stolen - yet again - Uncle Tom's antique silver cow-creamer. Suspicions fall on Wilbert Cream, believed to be a wealthy American practical joker and kleptomaniac known as Broadway Willie. But the incident only marks the beginning of Bertie Wooster's problems. It is only by a stroke of rare - very rare - genius that Bertie Wooster finds a solution. He recalls Jeeves, his incomparable manservant, from his annual holiday at Herne Bay, and Jeeves sorts out everybody and everything in his usual inimitable style.

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