National Book Festival authors: who would you interview?

SnakAuthor Interviews: You ask the questions!

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National Book Festival authors: who would you interview?

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1sonyagreen
Redigeret: aug 25, 2010, 3:51pm

The mission: to ask as many National Book Festival authors ONE question each!

Who on the NBF list would you be interested in asking a question? I may be able to snag just about any author attending the National Book Festival, so let me know who you'd like to ask a question of! Post your questions in this thread, with the author name first so I know who you're addressing.

So far, these are authors who have confirmed they're willing to answer a question:
Adele Alexander
Brad Meltzer
Jeff Smith of “Bone: Tall Tales.”
M.T. Anderson
Linda Sue Park
Norton Juster
Ree Drummond

2Katya0133
aug 25, 2010, 9:37am

Oooh!

Rosemary Wells and Henry Petroski

Do you want the questions in the thread, as well? (I'll need to think a bit.)

3sonyagreen
Redigeret: aug 25, 2010, 11:02am

Since we're doing multiple authors, yes, question in thread, but with their name written first. Please start asking questions of your nominated authors! That'll cut down on how long it takes to get this going.

I can't promise that I'll be able to snag every author, but I know lots of them are willing! (Suzanne Collins isn't available, I know, but she's the only "no, thank you" so far.)

4MerryMary
aug 25, 2010, 11:42am

Oh, my. So many. My first choice would be Judith Viorst. Such a wide range of writing skills.

5sonyagreen
aug 25, 2010, 2:14pm

Go ahead and drum up a question for her. So far, it sounds like the only author I KNOW isn't available is Suzanne Collins.

6MerryMary
aug 25, 2010, 3:00pm

Judith Viorst:

1. You write in such a wide variety of genres (science, children, poetry, psychology). Which do you find the most challenging? The most satisfying? The most fun?

2. I find a great deal of comfort and laughter in your age-related poetry. Do you have a favorite? Did you stumble upon this niche, or did you create it?

3. How did your boys feel originally about being subjects of children's books?

4. Tell us about "the boys" now - and all those wonderful grandchildren. (Aren't they fun?)

7etrainer
Redigeret: aug 26, 2010, 1:54pm

Scott Turow - At the end of Innocent, the character Rusty Sabich says, "I'm ready to find out what happens next." Will we find out what happens next? Will there be another book?

Edited for clarity and to correct numerous typos!

8Katya0133
aug 26, 2010, 3:10pm

Henry Petroski:

I keep wanting to think of a very clever question for you, but nothing I can think of seems good enough. Instead, I'll ask what is an object you've come across recently that caught your eye as being well designed?

9sonyagreen
aug 27, 2010, 10:09am

Excellent questions! Keep them coming!

10etrainer
aug 30, 2010, 1:17pm

Wow, I expected more posts here.

11sonyagreen
aug 31, 2010, 11:51am

I feel the same way. Spread the word, folks!

12Capybara_99
Redigeret: aug 31, 2010, 1:43pm

Richard Holmes:

Most of your work has been studies of figures of the Romantic Era. What concerns of the era do you feel resonate most interestingly today, and has your answer to that question changed in the decades you've been studying the Romantics?

13sonyagreen
sep 1, 2010, 2:10pm

I need to submit the questions tomorrow. We could still use questions for Adele Alexander, Brad Meltzer, Jeff Smith, M.T. Anderson, Linda Sue Park, Norton Juster and Ree Drummond.

Anyone, anyone?