Jimmy Corrigan

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Jimmy Corrigan

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1belleyang
Redigeret: apr 19, 2007, 3:24 pm

I'm only part way through this book and find it marvelous. I am lingering over the art and the way Ware drives the reader both in story and art. I hope people who are reading this will give us their thoughts on their experience of this book.

Yes, as Bluetyson pointed out, I am new to this genre. Is Chris Ware the first, or one of the first, or one among many who has worked in this, for lack of better words, "flow-of-consciousness" format?

I've read some of the Amazon reviews, and most people rate this book highly while some virtually call it an emperor without clothes.

Lolawalser, if you have the time or inclination, can comment?

2KromesTomes
apr 19, 2007, 3:31 pm

Well, I come down somewhere in the middle ... some parts were very engaging, but in others it seemed as if Jimmy was a bit too disingenuous for his own good ...

3belleyang
apr 19, 2007, 3:47 pm

>2 KromesTomes: Jimmy was a bit too disingenuous for his own good ... LOL!

4LolaWalser
apr 19, 2007, 3:56 pm

Is Chris Ware the first, or one of the first, or one among many who has worked in this, for lack of better words, "flow-of-consciousness" format?

Oh, he's definitely not the first. It helps to remember the similarity between comics and cinema--any "trick" employing broken sequences, multiple story lines, shifting in time etc.--you can be sure has been done, i.e. if it's been done in cinema, it's been done in comics. I've read a number of comics stories which employed devices similar to Ware's, but it won't be easy to quote the ones whose atmosphere and/or graphic style his reminds me of the most (one problem is that I know best non-American comics...) Stylistically, though, compare Ware's work to "Naughty Pete" in Art out of time--OH MY GOD SOMEONE'S IN MY HEAD--from the editorial notice on Amazon: "Charles Forbell's 1913 newspaper strip Naughty Pete looks like it had a huge influence on Chris Ware"!!!!! (I never saw that, I borrowed "Art out of time" from the library... ) It's not just about the style as such, though, Forbell (like Ware) twist the very frame of the boxes to become a part of the story and show not only what's in and what's out, but what's up and what's down, what's later and what's before...

But, story--well, as I said, I can think of several similar in atmosphere and structure but too vague for citation; there was a beautiful one about a pilot's last flight, seemingly linear and contemporary, which turns out to be the story of St. Exupery's disappearance--a Spanish author, I think--but you will come across many as you read.

5gregtmills
jul 3, 2007, 11:15 pm

Chris Ware is as much a graphic designer as an illustrator or cartoonist (or writer). The way he organizes information follows information design cues from people like Edward Tufte and Jan Tschichold.

The richness of the presentation is part of the pleasure of the books to be sure.