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Daniel B. Wallace

Forfatter af Greek Grammar Beyond the Basics

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Daniel B. Wallace (PhD, Dallas Theological Seminary) is professor of New Testament Studies at his alma mater and executive director of the Center for the Study of New Testament Manuscripts. He is a member of the Society of New Testament Studies, the Institute for Biblical Research, the Society of vis mere Biblical Literature, and the Evangelical Theological Society. He has authored, edited, or contributed to more than two dozen books and has been a consultant on several Bible translations. vis mindre
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Værker af Daniel B. Wallace

Greek Grammar Beyond the Basics (1996) 2,145 eksemplarer
The Basics of New Testament Syntax (2000) 515 eksemplarer
Who's Afraid of the Holy Spirit? (2005) 79 eksemplarer

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In his scholarly tome, The Orthodox Corruption of Scripture, and his more popular treatment, Misquoting Jesus Bart Ehrman has argued that the Biblical text that we have is deeply mired by tampering of scholars for theological reasons. In Revisiting the Corruption of the New Testament: Manuscript, Patristic and Apocryphal Evidence, the inaugural volume of the Text and Canon of the New Testament Series (from Kregel Publications), Dan Wallace has edited a volume which takes Ehrman to task. Wallace’s introductory chapter, is an expansion of a paper he delivered in 2008 as part a dialogue with Ehrman over the Corruption of the New Testament. The subsequent chapters are each written by former academic interns and ThM students of his at Dallas Theological Seminary. Individually, each essay presents a strong case; cumulatively they systematically demolish Ehrman’s arguments. For the most part, the author’s are judicious in their analysis (I only can think of one or two places which felt like over reaching to me) and each chapter evidences copious research. While the authors are all theologically conservative and take issue with many of Ehrman’s claims, this book is not a smear-campaign either. They respect Ehrman’s scholarship and confirm his findings where they feel it’s warranted, but it is clear that they find his premise wanting.

In Chapter 1, Dan Wallace presents a brief, accessible apologetic for the reliability of the New Testament, taking specific aim at Ehrman’s arguments. Next Philip Miller examines Ehrman’s methodology and reveals that Ehrman is committed to the premise that the least orthodox readings are closer to the original text, regardless of whether the textual evidence and scholarly consensus supports him. These two chapters provide a more general overview of the issue. Matthew Morgan and Adam Messer provide a more detailed account by each examining a specific text which are asserted to be ‘corrupt’ by Ehrman and others (John 1.1c and Matthew 24:36, respectively). They each demonstrate the spurious nature of Ehrman’s claims Tim Ricchuiti examines the text-critical transmission of Thomas showcasing where theological interests effected the transmission of that text in line with the theology of the Nag Hammadi writings. In the final chapter, Brian Wright examines the textual evidence for the equation of Jesus as God in the New Testament. Wright demonstrates that such claims are not a result of corruption, but are original to the first century Christian community.

This book is written for a scholarly rather than popular level (and is endorsed by an impressive stream of theological conservative scholars). Certainly students engaged in Biblical studies or textual criticism would benefit from reading this book. Yet, this book is also of value beyond the walls of academia. Giving the ubiquity of Bart Ehrman on college campuses, the New York Times best sellers list, and numerous television appearances, serious engagement with ideas is a necessary apologetic task. A book I read by Sam Harris, one of the so-called New Atheists, recommended Misquoting Jesus because of the way it undermines Christian truth claims and casts doubt on the reliability of the Bible. This book reveals the places where Ehrman’s assertions do not stand up to examination. Some of this book, will be too technical for popular consumption, but the book would make a good addition to a pastoral library and Dan Wallace’s and Philip Miller’s essays certainly are accessible to an educated layperson. I think the arguments in this book will remain significant for the Evangelical community at large.

Thank you to Kregel Publications for providing me with a copy of this book in exchange for this review.
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Jamichuk | May 22, 2017 |
For seminary students, the goal of studying Greek grammar is the accurate exegesis of biblical texts. Sound exegesis requires that the exegete consider grammar within a larger framework that includes context, lexeme, and other linguistic features. While the trend of some grammarians has been to take a purely grammatical approach to the language, Greek Grammar Beyond the Basics integrates the technical requirements for proper Greek interpretation with the actual interests and needs of Bible students. It is the first textbook to systematically link syntax and exegesis of the New Testament for second-year Greek students. It explores numerous syntactical categories, some of which have not previously been dealt with in print. Greek Grammar Beyond the Basics is the most up-to-date Greek grammar available. It equips intermediate Greek students with the skills they need to do exegesis of biblical texts in a way that is faithful to their intended meaning. The expanded edition contains a subject index, a Greek word index, and page numbers in the Syntax Summary section.… (mere)
 
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Paul_Brunning | 3 andre anmeldelser | Apr 26, 2016 |
While there were several excellent essays: those by Reg Grant, Dan Wallace, Jeff Louie, and Willie Peterson, there were several others that I thought unhelpful and a bit muddled. Eckman's "The Holy Spirit and our Emotions" seemed exegetically unsound. Overall, the writing (or editing) was poor. Knowing Dan Wallace's (the editor) commitment to excellent writing, this surprised me greatly.

Some very useful essays, but overall a disappointment.
 
Markeret
memlhd | 2 andre anmeldelser | Jan 23, 2016 |
While there were several excellent essays: those by Reg Grant, Dan Wallace, Jeff Louie, and Willie Peterson, there were several others that I thought unhelpful and a bit muddled. Eckman's "The Holy Spirit and our Emotions" seemed exegetically unsound. Overall, the writing (or editing) was poor. Knowing Dan Wallace's (the editor) commitment to excellent writing, this surprised me greatly.

Some very useful essays, but overall a disappointment.
 
Markeret
memlhd | 2 andre anmeldelser | Jan 23, 2016 |

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Værker
35
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5
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3,670
Popularitet
#6,897
Vurdering
½ 4.3
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ISBN
37
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4
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