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Værker af Hyeseung Song

Docile: Memoirs of a Not-So-Perfect Asian Girl (2024) 26 eksemplarer, 13 anmeldelser

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This review was written for LibraryThing Early Reviewers.
Docile is a poignant memoir that delves into the life of Hyeseung, a first-generation Korean-American navigating the complexities of identity. Hyeseung's memoir is both intimate and candid, offering readers a deeply personal glimpse into her experiences. Her journey to find her identity as a first-generation Korean-American is a poignant reminder of the complexities of cultural assimilation and self-acceptance. This memoir is recommended for anyone interested in immigrant experiences, cultural identity, and the human quest for belonging.… (mere)
 
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summerinabaddon | 12 andre anmeldelser | Jul 13, 2024 |
This review was written for LibraryThing Early Reviewers.
Ouch. I wanted to like this book - my wife is a 1st-gen Asian immigrant, I've been to Korea and taught Korean students, and I'm sympathetic to the immigrant experience. And Ms. Song is undeniably smart and has a good way with words. Her story is interesting - but given the inherent difficulty of memoirs in general (too many come off as a naked appeal for validation), this one fails to gain traction. Ms. Song excels in academia (and reminds us she speaks 6 languages) but apparently fails at one vital piece of immigrant success: adaptability. Ms, Song has many talents, yet she comes off as judgmental and, worse, unlikable. The reader is not surprised at all when her marriage falls apart, yet the author appears blindsided and unprepared for the aftermath.
I truly sympathize with Koreans stuck in their culture of achievement and parental obedience. I just wish we had a more sympathetic heroine to cheer for.
… (mere)
 
Markeret
Mike.Henderson | 12 andre anmeldelser | Jul 12, 2024 |
This review was written for LibraryThing Early Reviewers.
In Docile: Memoirs of a Not-So-Perfect Asian Girl, Hyeseung Song describes her life immigrating to Texas from Korea as a young child, growing up in poverty even while her family expects her to succeed. Her family struggles early on due to her father’s various failed business ideas and they only gain some security when her mother gets a job. The financial insecurity combined with her parents’ vastly different personalities leads to domestic violence, further adding to Hyeseung’s sense of uncertainty. Over time, she begins to make friends and find success at school, but her parents’ strict expectations leave her feeling adrift in her own home. She writes, “You learned love was entirely conditional, and you could vanish – even to your own mother – at any moment” (p. 72). Even getting into Princeton and succeeding at her classes isn’t enough to allay her feelings of displacement. Hyeseung writes, “Pinning everything on the nail of achievement had meant that failure was death and life was small. Ultimately, I had suffered anyway and my belief in this ontological structure had faltered” (p. 125). In her philosophy studies, Hyeseung found a way to describe what had been bothering her. She writes, “Descartes had devoted his life to locating contradictions and striking those that turned out to be false, in order to see if science were possible. But I wanted to know if I in any consistent way were possible. The solution up until then had been to amass achievement visible in both cultures, pursue a workable synthesis of beliefs, and shift my behavior depending on the local culture, while trying not to disappear through it all” (p. 165). Describing her mounting mental health struggles and how she perceived them during her combined law degree and philosophy PhD studies, Hyeseung writes, “My self-worth was tied to Work, as if Work were a star. Work and Worth were bound together and if one fell, then the other did, too” (p. 202). She links this to the added stress of her immigrant background and feelings of dual identities between her American and Korean cultural heritages, but this sense of self-worth will resonate with nearly anyone who has pursued graduate studies, particularly if their family treated their success or failure at these studies as reflective of the family’s worth. Hyeseung concludes, “In my life, I had tried to be a great daughter, a great student, a great wife, an American, a Korean, even a great artist – and through these pursuits, I had always chased an ought, forgetting to revel in what I actually already was” (p. 288). Song’s book will resonate with anyone who has felt torn between identities or struggled with their mental health. In particular, those with extensive experience in academia cannot help but find themselves in her words. Her honest narrative is a moving read for anyone who finds themselves feeling lost without the words to articulate the feeling.… (mere)
 
Markeret
DarthDeverell | 12 andre anmeldelser | Jul 5, 2024 |
This review was written for LibraryThing Early Reviewers.
“Docile” is a beautiful memoir about complicated family dynamics, about the obligations and pressures of being an immigrant in America stuck between two cultures, depression, art and love. @hyeseungs is a beautiful writer. ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️💫. Thanks to @librarythingofficial for a free copy in exchange for review.
 
Markeret
mrsgrits | 12 andre anmeldelser | Jul 3, 2024 |

Statistikker

Værker
1
Medlemmer
26
Popularitet
#495,361
Vurdering
½ 3.7
Anmeldelser
13
ISBN
1