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Kathryn Hughes (1) (1959–)

Forfatter af The Short Life and Long Times of Mrs. Beeton

For andre forfattere med navnet Kathryn Hughes, se skeln forfatterne siden.

6+ Works 913 Members 31 Reviews

Om forfatteren

Kathryn Hughes teaches biographical studies at the University of East Anglia.
Image credit: dancing with the editor

Værker af Kathryn Hughes

George Eliot: The Last Victorian (1999) 203 eksemplarer
The Lifted Veil: Women's 19th Century Stories (2005) — Redaktør — 112 eksemplarer
The Victorian Governess (1993) 49 eksemplarer
The Folio Book of Ghost Stories (2015) — Introduktion, nogle udgaver37 eksemplarer

Associated Works

Felix Holt, the Radical (1866) — Introduktion, nogle udgaver1,023 eksemplarer
Goblin Market and Selected Poems (2004) — Introduktion, nogle udgaver66 eksemplarer
Another Round of Stories by the Christmas Fire (1853) — Forord — 22 eksemplarer

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Discussions

Mrs. Beeton - Group Read - Discussion i 2014 Category Challenge (juni 2014)
Mrs. Beeton - Group Read - General i 2014 Category Challenge (februar 2014)

Anmeldelser

A tour of the Victorian era through body parts. The first four sections were excellent. The last, detailing the investigation and trail of a young man accused of a child’s death and dismemberment, is decidedly de trop, regardless of what insights are to be had about mental illness or the court system in the time. Aside from that caveat, the book is very written and very interesting. My advice: skip the last bit.
 
Markeret
PattyLee | 10 andre anmeldelser | Dec 14, 2021 |
Victorians Behaving Badly

Can you write a credible history of an era by focusing on parts of the body; or, more correctly regarding Victorians Undone, by using body parts as launch vehicles into interesting aspects of Victorian mores, style, medicine, law, social life, and more? Kathryn Hughes demonstrates that you can do a pretty good job of it as you entertain your readers with a wicked wit. At least the subjects of her history a long gone and thus saved from blushes.

The subjects here are “Lady Flora’s Belly,” morals, medicine, young Queen Victoria, and wild rumor; “Charles Darwin’s Beard,” beards out of control, and Darwin’s earthquaking theory; “George Eliot’s Hand,” rural life in real Middlemarch, dairymaid reputations, illicit love, and family squabbles; “Fanny Cornforth’s Mouth,” Dante Gabriel Rossetti, the Pre-Raphaelites, their models, the meaning and gradations of prostitution, and art; “Sweet Fanny Adams,” murder, status of children, plight of female children, English jurisprudence, insanity, and salty English seaman slang.

Hughes, with these body parts as starting points, manages to paint an illuminating landscape of 19th century England, some of which contradicts, at least anecdotally, perceptions that have come down to us in the literature of the day. For instance, in exploring the murder of “sweet Fanny Adams,” the real sweet here, not the slang pejorative, Hughes finds life in a law office quite the opposite of Bob Cratchit’s dismally hunched existence; clerks seem to come and go as they please throughout the day.

She makes her observations with considerable wit in a way Edwardian Mary Poppins would certainly approve. From the text on Darwin’s beard discussing the separation of genders in the context of societal roles, “ …the middle-class body had never appeared more gendered. Women’s crinolines, comprising a metal ‘cage’ over which a full skirt was displayed to braggardly effect, became so wide as to render physical activity both inside and outside the home tricky, if not quite as dangerous as satirical magazines liked to suggest. Husbands and brothers, meanwhile, adopted conspicuously long beards as a reminder that, no matter how many evenings they might spend in the drawing room listening to someone mangle Chopin, there was a warrior hiding under all that fur, just waiting to spring out and defend his territory. Stretched in different directions, horizontal and vertical, the two sexes could never be mistaken for one another.” As for pertinence, the latter on men might be something to ponder in the presence of 21 century facial fur.

This thoroughly enjoyable, well told romp through Victorian life will engage readers curious about the not-so decorous past. Readers should be aware, however, that the subtitle promises more than the book delivers. These readers attracted by the flesh might find the literary porn of era contained in the classic The Pearl.
… (mere)
 
Markeret
write-review | 10 andre anmeldelser | Nov 4, 2021 |
Victorians Behaving Badly

Can you write a credible history of an era by focusing on parts of the body; or, more correctly regarding Victorians Undone, by using body parts as launch vehicles into interesting aspects of Victorian mores, style, medicine, law, social life, and more? Kathryn Hughes demonstrates that you can do a pretty good job of it as you entertain your readers with a wicked wit. At least the subjects of her history a long gone and thus saved from blushes.

The subjects here are “Lady Flora’s Belly,” morals, medicine, young Queen Victoria, and wild rumor; “Charles Darwin’s Beard,” beards out of control, and Darwin’s earthquaking theory; “George Eliot’s Hand,” rural life in real Middlemarch, dairymaid reputations, illicit love, and family squabbles; “Fanny Cornforth’s Mouth,” Dante Gabriel Rossetti, the Pre-Raphaelites, their models, the meaning and gradations of prostitution, and art; “Sweet Fanny Adams,” murder, status of children, plight of female children, English jurisprudence, insanity, and salty English seaman slang.

Hughes, with these body parts as starting points, manages to paint an illuminating landscape of 19th century England, some of which contradicts, at least anecdotally, perceptions that have come down to us in the literature of the day. For instance, in exploring the murder of “sweet Fanny Adams,” the real sweet here, not the slang pejorative, Hughes finds life in a law office quite the opposite of Bob Cratchit’s dismally hunched existence; clerks seem to come and go as they please throughout the day.

She makes her observations with considerable wit in a way Edwardian Mary Poppins would certainly approve. From the text on Darwin’s beard discussing the separation of genders in the context of societal roles, “ …the middle-class body had never appeared more gendered. Women’s crinolines, comprising a metal ‘cage’ over which a full skirt was displayed to braggardly effect, became so wide as to render physical activity both inside and outside the home tricky, if not quite as dangerous as satirical magazines liked to suggest. Husbands and brothers, meanwhile, adopted conspicuously long beards as a reminder that, no matter how many evenings they might spend in the drawing room listening to someone mangle Chopin, there was a warrior hiding under all that fur, just waiting to spring out and defend his territory. Stretched in different directions, horizontal and vertical, the two sexes could never be mistaken for one another.” As for pertinence, the latter on men might be something to ponder in the presence of 21 century facial fur.

This thoroughly enjoyable, well told romp through Victorian life will engage readers curious about the not-so decorous past. Readers should be aware, however, that the subtitle promises more than the book delivers. These readers attracted by the flesh might find the literary porn of era contained in the classic The Pearl.
… (mere)
 
Markeret
write-review | 10 andre anmeldelser | Nov 4, 2021 |
The Short Life and Long Times Of Mrs. Beeton by Kathryn Hughes (2006)
 
Markeret
arosoff | 12 andre anmeldelser | Jul 10, 2021 |

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Associated Authors

Louisa May Alcott Contributor
Jane Austen Contributor
Charlotte Bronte Contributor
Kate Chopin Contributor
George Eliot Contributor
Elizabeth Gaskell Contributor
Charlotte Mew Contributor
Olive Schreiner Contributor
Mary Shelley Contributor
Peter Suart Illustrator
Edith Wharton Contributor

Statistikker

Værker
6
Also by
4
Medlemmer
913
Popularitet
#28,084
Vurdering
½ 3.7
Anmeldelser
31
ISBN
95
Sprog
8
Trædesten
131

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