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5+ Værker 110 Medlemmer 7 Anmeldelser

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Includes the name: Susan Bernofsky

Image credit: Susan Bernofsky speaking at swissnex San Francisco on April 3, 2013

Værker af Susan Bernofsky

Associated Works

Siddhartha : en indisk legende (1945) — Oversætter, nogle udgaver28,006 eksemplarer
Forvandlingen (1915) — Oversætter, nogle udgaver12,636 eksemplarer
The Black Spider (1842) — Oversætter, nogle udgaver735 eksemplarer
Go, Went, Gone (2017) — Oversætter, nogle udgaver734 eksemplarer
Hjemsøgelse (2008) — Oversætter, nogle udgaver699 eksemplarer
The End of Days (2012) — Oversætter, nogle udgaver593 eksemplarer
The Assistant (1908) — Oversætter, nogle udgaver523 eksemplarer
The Tanners (1985) — Oversætter, nogle udgaver473 eksemplarer
Memoirs of a Polar Bear (2014) — Oversætter, nogle udgaver347 eksemplarer
Berlin Stories (2006) — Oversætter, nogle udgaver314 eksemplarer
Røveren (1925) — Oversætter, nogle udgaver298 eksemplarer
The Microscripts (1985) — Oversætter, nogle udgaver269 eksemplarer
The Walk (1987) — Oversætter — 156 eksemplarer
Masquerade and Other Stories (1990) — Oversætter — 145 eksemplarer
Where Europe Begins (1991) — Oversætter, nogle udgaver115 eksemplarer
The Book of Words (2004) — Oversætter, nogle udgaver102 eksemplarer
Looking at Pictures (2006) — Oversætter, nogle udgaver98 eksemplarer
The Naked Eye (2004) — Oversætter, nogle udgaver93 eksemplarer
The Old Child (1999) — Oversætter, nogle udgaver89 eksemplarer
The Old Child and Other Stories (2005) — Oversætter — 49 eksemplarer
The Old Child and the Book of Words (2008) — Oversætter, nogle udgaver35 eksemplarer
False Friends (2009) — Oversætter, nogle udgaver7 eksemplarer

Satte nøgleord på

Almen Viden

Fødselsdato
1966-07-20
Køn
female
Nationalitet
USA
Erhverv
translator
Organisationer
Columbia University

Medlemmer

Anmeldelser

I've loved almost all of the translated work I've read and even those which aren't my favorite have been enjoyable for their novelty, so I was excited to pick up this anthology of essays by translators about their work. The first essay was a bit a of a let down though, too academic and abstract for my taste. Fortunately, very few essays in the collection had this flaw. Essay two, for example, provided immediate gratification with a discussion of the way translations are allowed to flout literary conventions, which resonated with me as one of my favorite features of the genre.

There were a few essays which I thought became too pedantic or talked about a text without sharing enough of the translation for me to follow. For the most part, though, the essays were easy to read but thought-provoking and raised issues I thought were relevant to me as a reader of translations. The middle portion of the book discussed an incredible range of issues translators can encounter which never occurred to me before. Some of the questions I found most interesting were whether translators should prioritize capturing the feel of the work they're translating or the exact meaning and how translators should handle words without exact matches in the language they're translating into. The essays at the end helped me understand what motivates translators. An essay by Murakami about translating The Great Gatsby was one of my favorites from this section.

Even there were a few essays in this collection which I didn't enjoy, the vast majority were both intellectually stimulating and fun reading. I think reading these essays will make me a better consumer of translated fiction, more aware of how translating works and which parts of the original are likely to be preserved through the translation process. I'm also going to try to do a better job giving translators a byline on my blog when I read translated work, because good translators are often overlooked. If you're someone who likes reading translated fiction or are interested in how languages differ from one another, I'd highly recommend this collection.This review was originally posted on Doing Dewey.
… (mere)
 
Markeret
DoingDewey | 6 andre anmeldelser | Feb 6, 2015 |
I've loved almost all of the translated work I've read and even those which aren't my favorite have been enjoyable for their novelty, so I was excited to pick up this anthology of essays by translators about their work. The first essay was a bit a of a let down though, too academic and abstract for my taste. Fortunately, very few essays in the collection had this flaw. Essay two, for example, provided immediate gratification with a discussion of the way translations are allowed to flout literary conventions, which resonated with me as one of my favorite features of the genre.

There were a few essays which I thought became too pedantic or talked about a text without sharing enough of the translation for me to follow. For the most part, though, the essays were easy to read but thought-provoking and raised issues I thought were relevant to me as a reader of translations. The middle portion of the book discussed an incredible range of issues translators can encounter which never occurred to me before. Some of the questions I found most interesting were whether translators should prioritize capturing the feel of the work they're translating or the exact meaning and how translators should handle words without exact matches in the language they're translating into. The essays at the end helped me understand what motivates translators. An essay by Murakami about translating The Great Gatsby was one of my favorites from this section.

Even there were a few essays in this collection which I didn't enjoy, the vast majority were both intellectually stimulating and fun reading. I think reading these essays will make me a better consumer of translated fiction, more aware of how translating works and which parts of the original are likely to be preserved through the translation process. I'm also going to try to do a better job giving translators a byline on my blog when I read translated work, because good translators are often overlooked. If you're someone who likes reading translated fiction or are interested in how languages differ from one another, I'd highly recommend this collection.This review was originally posted on Doing Dewey.
… (mere)
 
Markeret
DoingDewey | 6 andre anmeldelser | Feb 6, 2015 |
I've loved almost all of the translated work I've read and even those which aren't my favorite have been enjoyable for their novelty, so I was excited to pick up this anthology of essays by translators about their work. The first essay was a bit a of a let down though, too academic and abstract for my taste. Fortunately, very few essays in the collection had this flaw. Essay two, for example, provided immediate gratification with a discussion of the way translations are allowed to flout literary conventions, which resonated with me as one of my favorite features of the genre.

There were a few essays which I thought became too pedantic or talked about a text without sharing enough of the translation for me to follow. For the most part, though, the essays were easy to read but thought-provoking and raised issues I thought were relevant to me as a reader of translations. The middle portion of the book discussed an incredible range of issues translators can encounter which never occurred to me before. Some of the questions I found most interesting were whether translators should prioritize capturing the feel of the work they're translating or the exact meaning and how translators should handle words without exact matches in the language they're translating into. The essays at the end helped me understand what motivates translators. An essay by Murakami about translating The Great Gatsby was one of my favorites from this section.

Even there were a few essays in this collection which I didn't enjoy, the vast majority were both intellectually stimulating and fun reading. I think reading these essays will make me a better consumer of translated fiction, more aware of how translating works and which parts of the original are likely to be preserved through the translation process. I'm also going to try to do a better job giving translators a byline on my blog when I read translated work, because good translators are often overlooked. If you're someone who likes reading translated fiction or are interested in how languages differ from one another, I'd highly recommend this collection.This review was originally posted on Doing Dewey.
… (mere)
 
Markeret
DoingDewey | 6 andre anmeldelser | Feb 6, 2015 |
I've loved almost all of the translated work I've read and even those which aren't my favorite have been enjoyable for their novelty, so I was excited to pick up this anthology of essays by translators about their work. The first essay was a bit a of a let down though, too academic and abstract for my taste. Fortunately, very few essays in the collection had this flaw. Essay two, for example, provided immediate gratification with a discussion of the way translations are allowed to flout literary conventions, which resonated with me as one of my favorite features of the genre.

There were a few essays which I thought became too pedantic or talked about a text without sharing enough of the translation for me to follow. For the most part, though, the essays were easy to read but thought-provoking and raised issues I thought were relevant to me as a reader of translations. The middle portion of the book discussed an incredible range of issues translators can encounter which never occurred to me before. Some of the questions I found most interesting were whether translators should prioritize capturing the feel of the work they're translating or the exact meaning and how translators should handle words without exact matches in the language they're translating into. The essays at the end helped me understand what motivates translators. An essay by Murakami about translating The Great Gatsby was one of my favorites from this section.

Even there were a few essays in this collection which I didn't enjoy, the vast majority were both intellectually stimulating and fun reading. I think reading these essays will make me a better consumer of translated fiction, more aware of how translating works and which parts of the original are likely to be preserved through the translation process. I'm also going to try to do a better job giving translators a byline on my blog when I read translated work, because good translators are often overlooked. If you're someone who likes reading translated fiction or are interested in how languages differ from one another, I'd highly recommend this collection.This review was originally posted on Doing Dewey.
… (mere)
 
Markeret
DoingDewey | 6 andre anmeldelser | Feb 6, 2015 |

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Associated Authors

Ted Goossen Translator, Contributor
Haruki Murakami Contributor
Alice Kaplan Contributor
Christi A. Merrill Contributor
Lawrence Venuti Contributor
Peter Cole Contributor
Maureen Freely Contributor
Catherine Porter Contributor
Forrest Gander Contributor
David Bellos Contributor
Eliot Weinberger Contributor
Jason Grunebaum Contributor
Esther Allen Translator
Julia Kushnirsky Cover designer

Statistikker

Værker
5
Also by
22
Medlemmer
110
Popularitet
#176,729
Vurdering
3.9
Anmeldelser
7
ISBN
10

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