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Nuets kraft (1999)

af Eckhart Tolle

MedlemmerAnmeldelserPopularitetGennemsnitlig vurderingOmtaler
6,112981,204 (3.94)51
To make the journey into The Power of Now we will need to leave our analytical mind and its false created self, the ego, behind. From the beginning of the first chapter we move rapidly into a significantly higher altitude where one breathes a lighter air, the air of the spiritual. Although the journey is challenging, Eckhart Tolle offers simple language and a question and answer format to guide us. The words themselves are the signposts. The book is a guide to spiritual awakening from a man who has emerged as one of this generation's clearest, most inspiring teachers. Eckhart Tolle is not aligned with any particular religion but does what all the great masters have done: shows that the way, the truth, and the light already exist within each of us.… (mere)
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Engelsk (92)  Spansk (3)  Fransk (2)  Tysk (1)  Hollandsk (1)  Alle sprog (99)
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Do not presume Tolle's Power of Now is merely pop culture self-help or a shallow new age guru with nothing to offer. In fact, I would go as far as to say The Power of Now ought to be required reading for anyone who considers themselves spiritual. If you read it looking for faults or aspects to disagree with, no doubt, you will find them. Conservative religious people (of any faith) may be put off by his universalistic tone and language. However, if you can get past that and read this book with an open heart desiring to live more closely to God, I think your spiritual life will be deepened and you will be blessed. Overall, the primary truth he teaches resonated with me on a profound level.

With that said, there were 4 aspects of the book that were frustrating:

1. Repetition
Despite explicitly stating his repetitious nature in the introduction, it did feel a bit much. No doubt there's a meditative aspect to repetition, but I would guess the book length was determined more by publishers than by what's necessary. It easily could have been half as long. I would love a 1 or 5 page summary to reference.

2. Misuse of Jesus' word
Tolle does not align exclusively with any religion, although he references the Bible and Buddha most often. As a Christian, I found his interpretations of Jesus' words to sometimes be refreshing and enlightening. However, he also seemed to force his interpretive lens onto Jesus, at times explaining the "real" meaning of his words that were distorted by the writers of the New Testament. To me, this felt presumptuous, reeked of confirmation bias, and misrepresented Jesus. Try not to be hung up by this. The point he trying to make is that the truth he speaks of has a long history - it isn't something he just made up - which is unnecessary for his main point.

3. Style
Most of the book is written in a question and answer format, where Tolle responds to questions he's encountered over the years. To me, it felt disorganized and a little bit "all over the place."

4. Overly individualistic
Although, he touches on relationships, overall his approach to spirituality is highly individualistic. We are communal beings; grace and love are found primarily with others. I wish he had a better balance between solitude and community.

Despite my complaints, there is profound wisdom in this book. Highly recommended for all who wish to enrich their spiritual life. 4.5 stars. ( )
  nrt43 | Dec 29, 2020 |
5 stars for the author's ability to explain with clarity what has always been an ethereal and rather obtuse topic. ( )
  micahammon | Dec 19, 2020 |
We live in the age of affect. Embrace the woo woo. It's not all wrong.

And if you need help embracing the woo woo, skip the text version and go for the audiobook. ( )
  GeorgeHunter | Sep 13, 2020 |
The mind and our ability to think is one of the greatest vanguards against tyranny and evil of all kinds, be it political, intellectual, or spiritual. Therefore, have an abundance of caution, or dare I say, fly with all your might from those who will tell you that the mind is out to enslave you, that the mind is the enemy, and that thought is dangerous. Yet that is the premise of the opening chapter of The Power of Now.

Tolle frames his arguments, for whatever they're worth, in terms of extreme either/or statements. "You are not your mind." Very few people would have said that we were. Most people recognize the common sense notion that we are both mind and body. Likewise, he states that because thoughts can be compulsive and harmful (no argument there), that indicates there is something wrong with thought and the mind itself. That is like saying that cancer proves the body is evil.

Just as groups like the gnostics and Manicheans of the past taught that matter and the body is evil, Tolle goes to the opposite extreme in claiming the mind itself is evil.

He references Descartes' statement, "I think therefore I am." and says this means that Descartes' thought that the only thing in the universe is the mind. This is a gross misinterpretation of Descartes. It is true that the rationalist philosophers placed great emphasis on the power of the mind and innate ideas (something almost universally rejected today), but Descartes was trying to prove that he existed, but he also used this same line of argumentation to prove that others things besides him existed. Descartes' concern was epistemology, not ontology.

All these criticisms are from the first chapter. I stopped listening when, early in the second chapter, he said something to the effect that true love would never want someone to suffer. If by this he means that love would not take pleasure in suffering, that is of course correct. Love is not sadistic. But that is not what he said. The truth is that love is often the cause of our suffering. Consider a stark contrast in Catholicism. The sufferings of Mary, the mother of Jesus, were very great, but they were great because of her love for her son. If she failed to love her son, she would not suffer. If it was Mary rather than Judas (God forbid!) who betrayed Jesus, she, like Judas, would weep only for herself, and not for her son.

The only redeeming factor that takes this book from 1/2 to 1 star is some of the practical meditation techniques, but those can be found in numerous other locations. ( )
  neverstopreading | Aug 9, 2020 |
I really liked the first half of the book that explored being present and focusing on now. The second half was much harder to understand and not as powerful. ( )
  bsmashers | Aug 1, 2020 |
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You are here to enable the divine purpose of the universe to unfold. That is how important you are! - Eckhart Tolle
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When you say Being, are you talkíng about God? If you are, then why don't you say it?
The word God has become empty of meaning through thousands of years of misuse. I use it sometimes, but I do so sparingly. By misuse I mean that people who have never even glimpsed the realm of the sacred, the infinite vastness behind that word, use it with great conviction, as if they knew what they are talking about. Or they argue against it, as íf they knew what it is that they are denying. This misuse gives rise to absurd beliefs, assertions, and egoic delusions, such as "My or our God is the only true God, and your God is false," or Nietzsche's famous statement "God is dead." The word God has become a closed concept. The moment the word is uttered, a mental image is created, no longer, perhaps, of an old man with a white beard, but still a rnental representation of someone or something outside you, and, yes, almost inevitably a male someone or something. Neither God, nor Being nor any other word can define or explain the ineffable reality behind the word, so the only important question is whether the word is a help or a hindrance in enabling you to experience That toward which it points. Does it point beyond itself to that transcendental reality, or does it lend itself too easily to becoming no more than an idea in your head that you believe in, a mental idol?The word Being explains nothing, but nor does God. Being,however, has the advantage that it is an open concept. It does not reduce the infinite invisible to a finite entity. It is impossible to form a mental image of it. Nobody can claim exclusive possession of Being. It is your very essence, and it is immediately accessible to you as the feeling of your own presence, the realization I am that is prior to I am this or I am that. So it is only a small step from the word Being to the experience of Being.
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To make the journey into The Power of Now we will need to leave our analytical mind and its false created self, the ego, behind. From the beginning of the first chapter we move rapidly into a significantly higher altitude where one breathes a lighter air, the air of the spiritual. Although the journey is challenging, Eckhart Tolle offers simple language and a question and answer format to guide us. The words themselves are the signposts. The book is a guide to spiritual awakening from a man who has emerged as one of this generation's clearest, most inspiring teachers. Eckhart Tolle is not aligned with any particular religion but does what all the great masters have done: shows that the way, the truth, and the light already exist within each of us.

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